Wheel upgrades for better climbing speed

wacka
wacka Posts: 169
edited October 2012 in Road buying advice
Hi,

I'm looking at upgrading my wheels for better climbing, my budget is £600 - £700 any suggestions? It is for shimano 10 spd.

Cheers

Comments

  • A bit more information about you?
    left the forum March 2023
  • chanjy
    chanjy Posts: 200
    Pretty sure any increase in speed won't be down to the wheels themselves!

    Having said that, buy what you want - it's all in the mind, and if a new set of wheels makes you want to go out on your bike more that will make you faster :D
  • wacka
    wacka Posts: 169
    A bit more information about you?
    I commute 25 miles a day on fairly flat roads, but hit the hills on the weekend 30-50 miles with 5-10% gradients.
  • To be honest, and i don't know your weight etc, but dropping 2-3 lbs would be a much more noticeable and effective way of increasing your hill climbing, not to mention way cheaper! But if you are set on getting some new wheels look at some fulcrum racing zero's. http://www.wiggle.co.uk/fulcrum-racing- ... lset-2012/
  • mfin
    mfin Posts: 6,729
    Well, if you go for Racing Zero's and are buying now then PBK have 15% on their site (code on homepage) and the 'Competition Limited Edition' ones are £770.02 so minus 15% is £654.52 which is a slightly improved version of the wheel for less money than wiggle anyway.

    http://www.probikekit.com/uk/components/wheels/road-wheels/fulcrum-racing-zero-competition-limited-edition-wheelset.html
  • Are you guys millionaire?
    left the forum March 2023
  • unixnerd
    unixnerd Posts: 2,864
    I do a lot of big hills and light wheels help, so do lighter tyres. Anything around the 1500g a set mark is OK. I run Pro-Lite Braccianos but you might find Shimano RS80s for under 300.
    http://www.strathspey.co.uk - Quality Binoculars at a Sensible Price.
    Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert 2012, Cannondale CAAD5,
    Marin Mount Vision (1997), Edinburgh Country tourer, 3 cats!
  • mamba80
    mamba80 Posts: 5,032
    A DA cl/tl24 would be a far better bet for a factory option, at that price.

    Some handbuilts would be better value, but tbh if you want to climb fast you have to train correctly, wheels are a marginal thing really, especially considering your current riding.
  • Mr Dog
    Mr Dog Posts: 643
    Power to weight is key. Any light rim with as little flex as possible. I have RS80s and Elites. Both do the job and are all I am willing to spend. I have no experience of handbuilts, but I would guess they would be stiffer.
    Loose all the weight you can without compromising your ability to generate power. If you have tonnes of cash, and want to spend it, then lighten every component and pay your buddy to carry your water bottle to the top for you :wink:
    Why tidy the house when you can clean your bike?
  • carrock
    carrock Posts: 1,103
    I think when climbing, with every pedal stroke you are accelerating the wheels as you have no momentum, so lighter rims will always be worth it. Certainly when I dropped 1kg from my wheels andd tyres I noticed a big difference climbing/accelerating, not so much on the flat and certainly not downhill.

    All those people who say wheels make no difference must spend all their time cycling down a slope
  • carrock
    carrock Posts: 1,103
    baldwin471 wrote:
    To be honest, and i don't know your weight etc, but dropping 2-3 lbs would be a much more noticeable and effective way of increasing your hill climbing, not to mention way cheaper! But if you are set on getting some new wheels look at some fulcrum racing zero's. http://www.wiggle.co.uk/fulcrum-racing- ... lset-2012/

    Dropping 2 to 3 pounds? No. That is the same as saying cycling up hills with an empty water bottle makes a difference. It just doesnt.

    Dropping half a stone of bodyweight will make a difference. Dropping a stone or 2 will indeed make a noticeable difference
  • carrock wrote:
    baldwin471 wrote:
    To be honest, and i don't know your weight etc, but dropping 2-3 lbs would be a much more noticeable and effective way of increasing your hill climbing, not to mention way cheaper! But if you are set on getting some new wheels look at some fulcrum racing zero's. http://www.wiggle.co.uk/fulcrum-racing- ... lset-2012/

    Dropping 2 to 3 pounds? No. That is the same as saying cycling up hills with an empty water bottle makes a difference. It just doesnt.

    Dropping half a stone of bodyweight will make a difference. Dropping a stone or 2 will indeed make a noticeable difference

    I said compared to new wheels. What is going to be more effective, losing 2lbs or losing 200g on wheels?
  • mroli
    mroli Posts: 3,622
    To be fair - you'll also drop a fair whack of cash if you try and lose 200g on wheels which will make you lighter too...
  • Slack
    Slack Posts: 326
    It's all well and good selecting lighter wheels, but there might no point if said lighter wheels are not stiff enough for your body weight.
    Plymouthsteve for councillor!!
  • mamba80
    mamba80 Posts: 5,032
    carrock wrote:
    I think when climbing, with every pedal stroke you are accelerating the wheels as you have no momentum, so lighter rims will always be worth it. Certainly when I dropped 1kg from my wheels andd tyres I noticed a big difference climbing/accelerating, not so much on the flat and certainly not downhill.

    All those people who say wheels make no difference must spend all their time cycling down a slope

    Perhaps they understand more than you do?
    From this unscientific study, the extra weight of the wheels made didnt make much more difference than extra weight on the bike, just because something feels faster, it may not relate to faster HC times. also Alpe D is far far longer than anything in the uk, so differences become even less.
    As i said, if you want to be fast then you have to up your training, there are no short cuts.
    http://www.training4cyclists.com/how-mu ... lpe-dhuez/
  • wacka
    wacka Posts: 169
    baldwin471 wrote:
    To be honest, and i don't know your weight etc, but dropping 2-3 lbs would be a much more noticeable and effective way of increasing your hill climbing, not to mention way cheaper! But if you are set on getting some new wheels look at some fulcrum racing zero's. http://www.wiggle.co.uk/fulcrum-racing- ... lset-2012/
    I'm 90kg so might need a strong wheelset!
  • napoleond
    napoleond Posts: 5,992
    For a 90kg chap, Mavic Ksyrium Elites are about the best thing out there. Lightish, stiff as fook, look good, good spares backup (not that you'll need them).
    Insta: ATEnduranceCoaching
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  • carrock
    carrock Posts: 1,103
    i am 110kg and find that Rovee Fusee SL ( which weigh less than 1500g ) have never needed truing despite being 20/24 spoke and as light as a balloon
  • smidsy
    smidsy Posts: 5,273
    carrock wrote:
    i am 110kg and find that Rovee Fusee SL ( which weigh less than 1500g ) have never needed truing despite being 20/24 spoke and as light as a balloon

    Have you fitted them yet :lol:
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • Herbsman
    Herbsman Posts: 2,029
    Have you tried losing weight and pedaling harder? Both of these things will work and they're free.
    CAPTAIN BUCKFAST'S CYCLING TIPS - GUARANTEED TO WORK! 1 OUT OF 10 RACING CYCLISTS AGREE!
  • Chris James
    Chris James Posts: 1,040
    If you currently have crap tyres then i think lighter tyres make quite a difference. It isn't so much the weight, but the lighter more flexible housings have lower rolling resistance too.

    I don't know if a couple of hundred grams on the wheels is really going to make a massive difference to climbing performance though, unless we are talking about the placebo effect.

    I went out for a ride with a mate who bought a new bike about THREE KILOS lighter than his previous one, and well lighter than mine. I still dropped him on exactly the same climbs at the same point. (This isn't meant as bragging as I have other friends who can drop me at will too).
  • Giraffoto
    Giraffoto Posts: 2,078
    With wheels, stiffness/springiness (it's a word!) should have more of an effect on your hillclimbing than their weight. And do remember how important the engine is!
    Specialized Roubaix Elite 2015
    XM-057 rigid 29er
  • If you put it into perspective, spending 600-700£ to save 2-300grams of weight is stupid you wont notice any difference in hils, just do hill repeats and your fitness will get better and technique, 200grams is a piece of clothing, or 2 chicken breasts, why bother, The only benifit you will get is an empty pocket and you will look cool, how light is your bike now?
  • racingcondor
    racingcondor Posts: 1,434
    Since you are larger than the average racer type I'd recommend spending the cash on some handbuilts with decent hubs (Dura Ace is probably within that price range) and a strong enough rim / spoke combination that they are stiff when you are out of the saddle.

    I often recommend RS80's which are a great wheel for light riders (very light stiff rims and very competatively priced) but do a search on here for threads about them and you'll also spot quite a few broken spoke threads, usually from larger riders.
  • BikeSwan
    BikeSwan Posts: 260
    A nice pair of Shimano Dura-Ace C24 CL's would be a really nice climbing wheelset. Also look into the second hand market. You can get some real steals on a pair of carbon tubulars. And remember a good climbing wheelset will have a light rim, not necessarily a light hub. A friend of mine has a pair of 1800g tubulars which (because of the light rim and quality, heavy hubs) feel lighter and climb better than my old 1100g tubulars!
  • meesterbond
    meesterbond Posts: 1,240
    I'm thinking about something similar at the moment, hoping to head out to the Pyrennees next summer so wanted a wheelset that's nice and light.... .
    I reckon you can get a 20mm Carbon tubular rims built to some nice and light hubs that'll come in somewhere around 1100/1200g. The thing is 1) whilst I don't mind using tubs on my TT bike, for a multiday recreational ride I'm not sure I'd want the trouble of changing one, should I get a flat, and 2) what goes up, must come down and whilst the braking isn't horrendous on my existing carbon tubs in the dry, it's really not up there with an alloy braking track and it would be nice to enjoy the descent knowing that I could slow down if needed.
  • unixnerd
    unixnerd Posts: 2,864
    A friend has some Campagnolo Boras that come in around 1100g and look wonderful, I'm sure they're the main reason he put in a better time than me on a recent hill climb (nothing about him being younger and fitter......). But he said that braking wasn't great in the dry and scary in the wet. Looked gorgeous though.
    http://www.strathspey.co.uk - Quality Binoculars at a Sensible Price.
    Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert 2012, Cannondale CAAD5,
    Marin Mount Vision (1997), Edinburgh Country tourer, 3 cats!
  • lostboysaint
    lostboysaint Posts: 4,250
    I'd suggest a PM to Ugo about what he could build you based on your size, ability etc. Handbuilts will be much better.
    Trail fun - Transition Bandit
    Road - Wilier Izoard Centaur/Cube Agree C62 Disc
    Allround - Cotic Solaris
  • carrock
    carrock Posts: 1,103
    smidsy wrote:
    carrock wrote:
    i am 110kg and find that Rovee Fusee SL ( which weigh less than 1500g ) have never needed truing despite being 20/24 spoke and as light as a balloon

    Have you fitted them yet :lol:

    Nice one. Yes, 2000 odd miles as well.

    To be honest, I am surprised at how sturdy they are- although I do get a slight amount of brake rub when out of the saddle blasting up a hill, although to be fair, my bombproof Mavic CXP22s did that as well