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washing a bike

lydiag1984lydiag1984 Posts: 39
edited October 2012 in Workshop
Hi, I was just washing my bike today after a muddy cyclocross ride. I turned the bike over on the seat to try to get to all of the dirt. After I finished I was thinking it is a bad idea to wash a bike this way? Would pouring water over the bottom bracket like this make it more likely that water will enter the BB? thanks

Posts

  • Water will get into your BB when riding anyway. If there are drains in your BB shell it should just drain out. If it's a steel frame it should have a hole or lots in the BB shell to stop it rusting from the inside out.

    Given your BB will mostly likely have cartirdge bearings then water should not affect them to much if the seals are good. Ultimatrley if you do cyclo cross then BB's will have a limited life anyway.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • g00seg00se Posts: 2,221
    Just don't use a pressurised water spray - then it may get into the bearings.
  • greenteagreentea Posts: 180
    g00se wrote:
    Just don't use a pressurised water spray - then it may get into the bearings.


    Sorry but thats a bit of a myth. Its perfectly fine to use a pressure washer but just dont use it on 'jet'. As long as the water spray is dispersed 'set to wide', and constantly move the nozzle all over its fine.

    The pro teams use jet washers.
  • Ed JEd J Posts: 335
    edited October 2012
    greentea wrote:
    g00se wrote:
    Just don't use a pressurised water spray - then it may get into the bearings.


    Sorry but thats a bit of a myth. Its perfectly fine to use a pressure washer but just dont use it on 'jet'. As long as the water spray is dispersed 'set to wide', and constantly move the nozzle all over its fine.

    The pro teams use jet washers.

    But their bikes aren't going to last as long as your average non-pro rider would like them to and they know it. They do it anyway because they have to clean so many bikes in a very short amount of time. They have to replace the bearings very regularly.

    Plus pro teams use ceramic bearings...
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    Jet washes and bike go together like marmite and caviar.

    I had to jet wash my MTB once after a filthy ride and the bike was caked in thick mud that over doubled the weight of the thing. After that the front brake caliper needed rebuilding, the BB was srewed and other stuff. Never ever et wash a bike if you want it to work properly afterwards.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • thanks for the answers. The pressure washer is not as option as all I have is a bucket and a sponge!
  • Jet washes and bike go together like marmite and caviar.

    I had to jet wash my MTB once after a filthy ride and the bike was caked in thick mud that over doubled the weight of the thing. After that the front brake caliper needed rebuilding, the BB was srewed and other stuff. Never ever et wash a bike if you want it to work properly afterwards.
    Me too :cry:
    You've no won the Big Cup since 1902!
  • Ed JEd J Posts: 335
    I wash mine with a hose and car washing brush and the tap turned a fraction of a turn for the tiniest dribble of water to aid the mud being washed away.
  • greenteagreentea Posts: 180
    As i said but no-one can read these days. A pressure washer is fine as long as its not on 'jet' setting, by that i mean fine, thin nozzle stream. It must be on wide setting.
    As i also said, keep it moving and its fine.

    Regardless of pro teams replacing bearing etc, they dont do it after ever stage otherwise it would cost a fortune. Jet washers are fine if used properly.

    Its like Stevie Wonder trying to teach Stephen Hawkings how to play the piano on here sometimes.
  • g00seg00se Posts: 2,221
    That or folks disagree with you.
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