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Plasticine Tool or indestructible chain?

NavrigNavrig Posts: 1,352
edited July 2012 in Workshop
Followig on from this thread:

viewtopic.php?f=40042&t=12868234

I have fitted the links to my Shimano 10 speed chain however in doing so I had to do this to my chain tool:

Plasticine.jpg

Basically the pins would not move without brute force and the helping hand of a spanner to give me more leverage.

The pin in the 9 speed chain just popped out with much less effort.

Why the difference?

Posts

  • Mike03776Mike03776 Posts: 40
    Which chain was it exactly?
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    If it's any consolation that was my experience the first time I tried to break my 10 sp 105 chain! Bent my trusty old Halfords chain tool like a banana. It had been dealing with 8 speed mtb chains for years.

    I think the tolerances must be so much tighter in the manufacture of narrow 10 speed chains; I've observed that pushing out a pin, when you eventually manage it, shaves off a tiny bit of metal. Presumably this is part of the reason you can't reuse them.

    I now use KMC joining links rather than faff with Shimano joining pins.

    God knows what will happen if I ever need to break the chain using the tiny thing on my multitool :shock:
  • NavrigNavrig Posts: 1,352
    Mike03776 wrote:
    Which chain was it exactly?

    Pretty sure it is a Shimano 105. I have just done 43 miles on it and no sign of stiff links. I checked the chain when it was unconnected and it was pretty free.
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    The pins on modern 10-speed chains are held far more securely - the ends are peined-over to stop them coming-out. This means your chain tool needs to exert more force to release them - you tool is made from mild-steel and not strong-enough
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • NavrigNavrig Posts: 1,352
    Monty Dog wrote:
    The pins on modern 10-speed chains are held far more securely - the ends are peined-over to stop them coming-out. This means your chain tool needs to exert more force to release them - you tool is made from mild-steel and not strong-enough

    Not plasticine then? :roll:

    Ta. Didn't know (beforehand) that there was a difference between 9sp and 10sp.

    I'd hate to have tried to do that at the roadside. In fact I couldn't have as the spanner was a necessary.

    Any suggestions on a replacement which will still fit in a saddle bag?
  • danmitchdanmitch Posts: 47
    Park Tool CT-5 is tiny (easily fits in a saddle bag) and works fine on 10-speed, I have used it several times on Shimano 105 / Dura Ace and Ultegra 10 speed chains - never a problem with bending / lack of leverage.
    http://www.parktool.com/product/mini-ch ... -tool-ct-5
  • Mike03776Mike03776 Posts: 40
    Monty Dog'censored the nail on the head. If you have a look at the pin you managed to get out you'll see what he means.
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