Singlespeed conversion

jamesyp21
jamesyp21 Posts: 36
edited July 2012 in Workshop
Right, so I am very new to the fettling world, and having bought one of the Lidl stands the other day, I feel I should use it to build something useful with something that is falling apart in my shed.

I have an old Dawes 200 road bike and I want to make is a singlespeed, so I was going to buy this:

http://www.winstanleysbikes.co.uk/product/8526/DMR_Single_Speed_Chain_Tensioner_Kit

Is this all I need for the rear wheel? I am able to deal with the front cog myself.

Thanks,

James

Comments

  • daveyroids
    daveyroids Posts: 223
    That looks about right. Welcome to my world I love single speed / fixed. Don't know why but I fell like I'm 10 years old again when I'm riding mine.
  • jamesyp21
    jamesyp21 Posts: 36
    That's kind of what happened to me when I borrowed my brothers Spesh Langster.

    Also, embarrassingly, how I feel when cycling a Boris Bike around London!

    Thanks for the confirmation. I'll get cracking and be a "fakenger" in no time!
  • daveyroids
    daveyroids Posts: 223
    Was thinking,

    Don't know your budget or preferances but I bought a Giant Bowery on Ebay fairly cheaply which was collection only (£140). You could then have a proper single spped and a geared? Just a thought.
  • cycleclinic
    cycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    If your old dawes has forward sliding dropouts then you will not need the tensioner. If you cannot get the chain to join with your cog choice then a half link would have to be used or use a different rear cog. Each tooth added/taken away adds/takeaway 1/4" from the chain wrap.

    I ride two MTB's with vertical dropouts, single speed with no tensioner. That works well also but you have to pick the sprocket sizes correctly so the chain joins, pretty easy to do though. Also the bike has no way of compensating for the inevible chain wear and therefore chains have to be changed more regulaly but chain life is still good enough and KMC single speed Z510 or 8 speed Z82 chains are pretty cheap. Wait for the folk who will tell you this tensionerless method is daft and does not work well for long. I have some experience that says otherwise.

    There are many ways to skin this cat.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • daveyroids
    daveyroids Posts: 223
    Sheldon Brown writes about that. Never tried it myself but I know I can run my fixed gear for sometimes a season without needing to adjust the wheel to take up the slack. Like you say chains can be purchased at a reasonable price and experience has shown me that a cheap chain does just as well as an expensive one on single speed.
  • nicklouse
    nicklouse Posts: 50,675
    If your old dawes has forward sliding dropouts then you will not need the tensioner. If you cannot get the chain to join with your cog choice then a half link would have to be used or use a different rear cog. Each tooth added/taken away adds/takeaway 1/4" from the chain wrap.

    I ride two MTB's with vertical dropouts, single speed with no tensioner. That works well also but you have to pick the sprocket sizes correctly so the chain joins, pretty easy to do though. Also the bike has no way of compensating for the inevible chain wear and therefore chains have to be changed more regulaly but chain life is still good enough and KMC single speed Z510 or 8 speed Z82 chains are pretty cheap. Wait for the folk who will tell you this tensionerless method is daft and does not work well for long. I have some experience that says otherwise.

    There are many ways to skin this cat.
    Tis how I run my SS XC bike. I also run a half link chain ;)
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • jamesyp21
    jamesyp21 Posts: 36
    Thanks for the advice.

    As far as just buying one goes, part of my logic is that I want to learn more about bikes and I decided a straightforward conversion would let me see how I fit the basics.

    I did think about making my life more difficult by just adjusting chain lenght etc, but I think I may go with the tensioner for ease, and potentially lose it after a few months.
  • daveyroids
    daveyroids Posts: 223
    I'm up for tinkering with bikes. I built my first fixed from an old Raleigh feame and used a screw on block wheel. I learned loads from setting is up and especially the problems I faced to get the chain to run in line. Good stuff!