Bottom bracket tap/facing

woolwich
woolwich Posts: 298
edited January 2012 in Workshop
Folks,

I have just finished building my second frame and will probably do a few more. I need to clean out the threads of the bottom bracket and possibly face the surfaces.
The first time I got my LBS to do this, who were very helpful and didnt charge but unfortunatly its a hassle getting to them and could add a week or two onto the build time due to work commitments.
Ive been looking at tools to do this and nearly choked at the cost. It seems you either have to pay four or five hundred quid for pro standard stuff or take a chance on ebay for half the money.
I understand you get what you pay for with tools but wondered if anyone had tried one of the cheaper brands such as x-tools, unior or cyclo or other stuff made by them?
I just cant justify the cost of a park tools set or similar, so if the cheaper ones are truley dreadful I'll stick with going to the shop when I can.

Cheers
Mud to Mudguards. The Art of framebuilding.
http://locksidebikes.co.uk/

Comments

  • desweller
    desweller Posts: 5,175
    I think the Cyclo stuff is OK for a home workshop. For chasing threads you might be able to get away with notching a BB cup from an old adjustable-style BB with a Dremel. Facing tools are a bit more tricky though...wonder if I could manage something with an old grinding wheel? Hmm... <scuttles off to shed>
    - - - - - - - - - -
    On Strava.{/url}
  • woolwich
    woolwich Posts: 298
    Thanks. I'll give an old bb cup a try. After all its only got to cut through some light oxidisation and a couple of blobs of braze.
    Im starting to wonder if facing shells is essential inthe modern world. They seem pretty parallel if I put some calipers over them. Im starting to think that modern manufacturing tolerances are so tight that for a hobby build you could probably cut a corner.

    Cheers
    Mud to Mudguards. The Art of framebuilding.
    http://locksidebikes.co.uk/
  • nicklouse
    nicklouse Posts: 50,675
    woolwich wrote:
    Im starting to wonder if facing shells is essential inthe modern world. They seem pretty parallel if I put some calipers over them. Im starting to think that modern manufacturing tolerances are so tight that for a hobby build you could probably cut a corner.

    Cheers
    you would be surprised how bad the tolerances are. It is essential if you want the bearings to last any time.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • maddog 2
    maddog 2 Posts: 8,114
    some shells are better than others. Bare ti shells often don't need facing. Ones with lots of paint can be miles out.

    see dotbike for some cheap but decent facing and tap tools
    Facts are meaningless, you can use facts to prove anything that's remotely true! - Homer
  • woolwich
    woolwich Posts: 298
    Thanks for talking sense to me. I'll do the job properly. I'm not Cav but even under light load a bb is still subjected to tens of thousands of revolutions in a decent ride so got to be worth the effort.

    Cheers for the link to Dotbike. Not one Ive come across and about as comprehensive selection of tools Ive seen. I'll just have to set a budget and do it.
    Mud to Mudguards. The Art of framebuilding.
    http://locksidebikes.co.uk/
  • maddog 2
    maddog 2 Posts: 8,114
    I have the Cyclus facing tool, which is excellent

    http://www.dotbike.com/p/349

    Not managed to get the thread tap yet though. Not quite a big enough reason (and too many other goodies to buy before)

    http://www.dotbike.com/p/899
    Facts are meaningless, you can use facts to prove anything that's remotely true! - Homer
  • woolwich
    woolwich Posts: 298
    Thanks again. That cyclus kit comes in at around half the cost of the premium stuff, so well worth considering.

    One thing confuses me though. If you use a two different tools for facing and tapping, how do you ensure the ends are perfectly square to the thread? Couldnt you just be machining the faces flat without them being in the right plane?

    The expensive stuff uses the tap as a guide to ensure they align properly with the axle, but Im not sure if this is just overkill or common sense.

    Either way, I appreciate your advice. Cheers
    Mud to Mudguards. The Art of framebuilding.
    http://locksidebikes.co.uk/