Forum home Road cycling forum Workshop

Mudguards.... Better off without....

islwynislwyn Posts: 650
edited January 2012 in Workshop
Well after seeing my Brother fit some CRUD 700c MK2 to his Specialized and them working a treat, I ordered some for my BMC SR02, got back tonight to fit them and bloody nora what a mission. Followed the YouTube tutorial and it became very clear early on that it just wasn't gonna work, the space between my continental ultra gatorskin and frame is 1mm... That's probably being generous too... Spent ages, hours in fact... Wheel wouldn't even spin... Not even a little bit. The most annoying thing is I followed the video, it suggested if the frame gap was too small, cut the guard and try again - well I cut it and it still wouldn't work so now I can't even send them back to the retailer!

Annoyed. Guess I'll just continue to get skid marks up my back.

On other thought... Maybe I'll drop it off to a bike shop and just get them to fit one and spend even more cash?

Posts

  • napoleondnapoleond Posts: 5,983
    Crud say you need 5mm clearance to be able to fit them. They won't fit on some bikes.
    Twitter - @NapD
    Strava - Alex Taylor (sportstest.co.uk)
    ABCC Cycling Coach
  • JamesBJamesB Posts: 1,184
    Why not try raceblades? not full protection but stop skid marks :) and very easy to fit; may be bit tight on front wheel / down tube if very close clearances but rear no issue as ends at brake bolt
  • The world of winter pedallers is divided between those who use mudguards and those who don't. I don't as the hassle overwhelm the benefit... of course if you commute, you might have the opposite view. For recreational cycling they are unnecessary
  • NWLondonerNWLondoner Posts: 2,047
    TBH unless i was a commuter or riding in a club that stipulates using mudguards i prefer NOT to use them.

    I have used both raceblades and the cruds mk2 and like ugo says the hassle just isn't worth it.

    Okay you have to clean your bike more but this is preferable to keep pulling over in the pissing rain to keep adjusting the damn things.

    Also with the added risk of debris getting caught and dislodging the guards into the wheel i'd rather not take the chance.
  • BozmanBozman Posts: 2,570
    I ripped my cruds off in a rage last year due to constantly getting mud caught between the mudguard and the tyre, i thought that i'd give them another go this year and i'm glad i've got them.
    I went out last friday on a bike without mudguards and ended up riding for near-on 3hrs in the rain, soaked and sore in places that aren't usually wet when i'm on my winter bike.
  • islwynislwyn Posts: 650
    I commute daily & ride in groups most weekends so it's quite necessary I have them but I was seriously getting peeved last night trying to fit the CRUD's especially when I saw a question on the Evans website of someone asking if they'd fit a SR02 standard fit and the staff remember replying with 'yes'... What a lie!

    I've checked out the blades and they look like they'll do the job perfectly so I've ordered a pair - Thank you!
  • JamesBJamesB Posts: 1,184
    Okay you have to clean your bike more but this is preferable to keep pulling over in the pissing rain to keep adjusting the damn things

    Not really found having to readjust an issue; if you use an old strip inner tube between frame stays and raceblade `feet attachments`, make sure rubber straps pulled tight, and I wrap mine double anyway, the blades stay secure and the frame is not marked by the `feet attachments`.
  • Old TuggoOld Tuggo Posts: 482
    I am a great believer in mudguards on winter bikes as I hate the thought of all the grit,mud and water penetrating the transmission/bearings and advocate full mudguards if they will fit, also I would not be welcome on the clubrun without them. It is also a great feeling when one transfers to your best bike with no guards, one really feels the benefit. However last week after the strong winds, a thick twig flicked up into my front wheel causing the protruding mudguard stays to jam either side of the downtube which locked up my steering. Fortunately I was riding slowly up a steep hill so I was able to get my foot out in time but it could have been disastrous if I had been going at any speed. The stays in the plastic retainer on the forks were still in place as the mudguards had not been forced out enough to free them. I will have to saw off the small length of protruding stay.
  • LookyhereLookyhere Posts: 987
    After years of not having mudguards i got some cruds and they didnt fit... so i got some raceblades but for whatever reason i couldnt get the required clearance of 15mm on the rear blade, after an hr or 2 i snapped, ripped them off the bike, stamped on them, twisted them up into a ball and threw them out as far as i could :twisted: throwing all the bits left into the bin
    after i calmed down and thought about the £30 i d wasted. i found them and straightened them out as best i could, went through the rubbish bin and amazingly they fitted first time... perfectly :D

    Though they could be longer, especially at the back, im just so much drier (and warmer) than before.
    also, brakes last longer as less xxxx is thrown up onto the rim/pad area.
  • markos1963markos1963 Posts: 3,724
    I know it sounds daft by why not buy a winter bike that can take mudguards? :wink:
  • NWLondonerNWLondoner Posts: 2,047
    markos1963 wrote:
    I know it sounds daft by why not buy a winter bike that can take mudguards? :wink:


    Money, lack of :(
  • ben16vben16v Posts: 296
    if your cruds are no good now you`ve hacked them up i`d be interested in the rear tail of you as i broke mine
    i need more bikes
  • LookyhereLookyhere Posts: 987
    markos1963 wrote:
    I know it sounds daft by why not buy a winter bike that can take mudguards? :wink:


    Yes it does! we havnt all got your money :shock:
  • markos1963markos1963 Posts: 3,724
    Lookyhere wrote:
    markos1963 wrote:
    I know it sounds daft by why not buy a winter bike that can take mudguards? :wink:


    Yes it does! we havnt all got your money :shock:

    My winter bike cost me less than a set of RS80 wheels! :lol:
  • islwynislwyn Posts: 650
    So... The SKS Rear fits! Yay... No more wet back.

    Although the SKS front doesn't .... BOO.... BMC and their weird frames are annoying.

    So I now have a set of unused (slightly shorter rear) CRUD MK2 Set... And a front SKS unused. :evil:
  • mabbomabbo Posts: 117
    I have just fitted a set of the Crud Mk2,s to my Giant Defy 1. I take a small frame, so as suggested on the Crud website video I had to cut off the last couple of inches of the rear guard.
    All in all took about an hour and a half to fit.
    End result is brilliant. No censored up my back, a lot dryer when it has rained, bikes cleaner, and whats more the chainset is staying a lot cleaner. (Miles wise even in winter I get 70 - 80 per week completed). Mainly on country lanes, always damp and throwing censored at you. So I'd say go ahead and fit them if. If they'll fit a small Defy they should fit most others. Look great on mine as well as the bike is mainly black.
    10 / 10 to Mr. Crud.
  • MichaelWMichaelW Posts: 2,226
    Old Tuggo wrote:
    ... last week after the strong winds, a thick twig flicked up into my front wheel causing the protruding mudguard stays to jam either side of the downtube which locked up my steering.

    SKS chromoplastic mudguards come with a safety quick release in the event of a jam. Mine has activated twice in as many decades.
    Chromoplastic is so tough that, in case of a jam, it will fold up under the steerer and stop the wheel instantaneously. The old plastic mudguards were so brittle they would shatter with no jam. Ive used stainless steel mudguards, they may bend a bit but they wont fold up.
    Personally I wouldn't like to use any modern mudguard that lacks a safety release.
  • Old TuggoOld Tuggo Posts: 482
    MichaelW wrote:
    Old Tuggo wrote:
    ... last week after the strong winds, a thick twig flicked up into my front wheel causing the protruding mudguard stays to jam either side of the downtube which locked up my steering.

    SKS chromoplastic mudguards come with a safety quick release in the event of a jam. Mine has activated twice in as many decades.
    Chromoplastic is so tough that, in case of a jam, it will fold up under the steerer and stop the wheel instantaneously. The old plastic mudguards were so brittle they would shatter with no jam. Ive used stainless steel mudguards, they may bend a bit but they wont fold up.
    Personally I wouldn't like to use any modern mudguard that lacks a safety release.
    In my case the mudguard stays were not forced out of the safety release as the mudguards are fairly close to the downtube.
Sign In or Register to comment.