What would you say is the most common setup for gears?

mattrixdesign2
mattrixdesign2 Posts: 644
edited August 2011 in Workshop
What would you say is the most common setup for gears? I.E. how many / sizes?

Just out of curiosity... being a MTBer I am used to 21 (3x7) in the old days, 27 (3x9) my current Rock Hopper - and now it seems the trend is going toward 20 (2x10 etc).

Bought my first road bike in Dec, and buying on a tight budget I went for an Allez 16 (2x8). It only took a few killer hils to decide I wanted a compact, which I have recently purchased, soon to be fitted. Not sure whether to go with 8/9/10(?) at the rear. It would be nice to have a few more gears...

So what is the current trend in road bikes?

Comments

  • If you want more gears you should have got a triple instead of a compact.
  • If you want more gears you should have got a triple instead of a compact.

    ..happy to keep it a double, just possibly have a few more at the rear, that are closer together.

    Besides the question is more out of curiosity.
  • daviesee
    daviesee Posts: 6,386
    Don't worry about trends, get the gears you need.

    8 speed is probably more robust than 10 speed and your frame may not be 10 speed compatible (distance between the stays) but other than that I can't think why you would go 8 instead of 10.
    Struggle up hills? 12-27.
    Fast on the flats? 11-23.
    Compromise? 11-25.
    None of the above should be taken seriously, and certainly not personally.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    I suppose the current trend is a compact double with a 10 speed 12-27 cassette.

    I ignored trends and went for a triple and 12-25 10 speed cassette. I know with 30 theoretical combinations there's lots of duplication, but I also have a big spread of gears without any big gaps, which is what I need to keep spinning to help my knackered knees.

    10 speed chains are still a bit pricy compared with 8 / 9.
  • keef66 wrote:
    I suppose the current trend is a compact double with a 10 speed 12-27 cassette.

    Thanks, I presumed it would be something like this.

    I am going to see what kind of range my compact gives with the 8 speed cassette, the plan is to go 8 or 9.
  • daviesee wrote:
    Don't worry about trends, get the gears you need.

    8 speed is probably more robust than 10 speed and your frame may not be 10 speed compatible (distance between the stays) but other than that I can't think why you would go 8 instead of 10.
    Struggle up hills? 12-27.
    Fast on the flats? 11-23.
    Compromise? 11-25.

    Not to concerned, just wondering.
  • You can always use an MTB cassette. Then you can go up to 11-34....Mind you, you will need a new shifter (9speed) and an MTB rear mech....
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  • You can always use an MTB cassette. Then you can go up to 11-34....Mind you, you will need a new shifter (9speed) and an MTB rear mech....

    ...currently I can only afford the crankset. Shifters/mech/cassette will have to wait.
  • alfablue
    alfablue Posts: 8,497
    could have kept the original chainset and increased your gearing by going 9 speed shifters, mtb mech and cassette of your choice. On my g/f's Trek 1.2, to make it touring friendly, I got s/h Ultegra shifters for £30, s/h XT mtb mech for £11, new 11-34 9 speed SRAM cassette and KMC chain, all in cost about £85. since swapped to new SLX rear mech - only cos I got one cheap.
  • Get the compact crankset. Then look out for a set of 10 speed levers second-hand for a good price. After that you`ll need a 10 speed cassette (12-27 as suggested) and a 10 speed chain, job done. 8,9 and 10 speed cassettes all fit the same free-hubs so no dramas there.
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  • If you want more gears you should have got a triple instead of a compact.

    ..happy to keep it a double, just possibly have a few more at the rear, that are closer together.

    That is the failing of double compact. They often supply the range of desired gears, but not enough gears withing that range. You get closer ratios with triple.
  • mz__jo
    mz__jo Posts: 398
    More gears just increases your chances of being in the wrong one! 8 sp is fundamentally more robust than 9 sp or 10. I am very happy with an 11-30 8 sp cassette. It is very difficult to see where adding one or two sprockets will greatly improve things.
  • daviesee wrote:
    Don't worry about trends, get the gears you need.

    Too true. I cleaned my cassette a few months back and noticed I hardly used the 12/13 gears so I changed the cassette for 14-25 which gives me 16-17-18-19, a nice little range which suits me fine.
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  • maddog 2
    maddog 2 Posts: 8,114
    9 and 10 spd are easily robust enough. If you're planning on never servicing it or riding across a desert then, fair enough, go with 8spd but under normal conditions 9/10 are fine.

    My advice would be to go 34/50 and a 12-27. Low enough for most things, you can run (any) roadie mechs and if you need it even lower then a 33t ring is possible and/or a 11-28 cassette with the latest roadie mechs (or beyond with an MTB mech).

    As for 9 or 10, it's a close call. 10spd is slightly snappier and you can upgrade further obviously. Plus you can now get 11-32 cassettes in 10spd (Apex) so you can go even lower still. Having said that, I run 9 on the commuter as it's less sensitive to setup than 10, and I rotate the chains with my mtb (still on 9 there).
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