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Heart Rates an all of that jazz

mudcow007mudcow007 Posts: 3,861
edited August 2011 in Commuting chat
just bought my self a heart rate monitor because i was in decathlon an have just been paid

just put the thing around my chest an configured the watch thingy an it reckons my heart rate is 53

using this Graph to gauge how healthy i am, it seems i'm an athlete

where do i sign up to do the Olympics? or is it a sign im about to have a stroke?

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  • MaxticateMaxticate Posts: 193
    Recovery rate is more important than resting heart rate as an indicator of fitness.

    But we could have a one upmanship thread on resting heart rate :wink: . Lowest I managed to get mine to was 39.
  • mudcow007mudcow007 Posts: 3,861
    ah so how fast it stops beating at 200 to normal again, gotcha i will have a go at that next

    good job its Friday an its empty here as im jumping up a down in my office trying to get a sweat on
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  • MaxticateMaxticate Posts: 193
    If you have stairs in your office try this

    http://www.topendsports.com/testing/tes ... arvard.htm
  • timmyflashtimmyflash Posts: 526
    The 220 - age thing or whatever it is is rubbish apparently. I'm 29, reasonably healthy, but mine bumps up to 215 on hills and sprints.

    I don't really know it's value, but find it a helpful guide for effort on the turbo.. Thas jus' me
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  • essex-commuteressex-commuter Posts: 2,188
    Maxticate wrote:

    But we could have a one upmanship thread on resting heart rate .

    :arrow: :arrow: :arrow: Paging EKE_89BPM
  • Rich158Rich158 Posts: 2,348
    Mine never normally gets above 175 although I did max out at 185 in a sprint at Crystal Palace once. A 2nd cat rider in my club has very similar max/min values to me yet he's at least 10 years my junior and a good deal quicker than me. It's useful as a guide to tell you how hard your working and invaluable if you know what your HR zones are and how to use them. I generally use mine to guide my recovery rides and that's about it, the problem is there is always a lag as your hr catches up with your effort if you're trying to use it to guide an interval session
    pain is temporary, the glory of beating your mates to the top of the hill lasts forever.....................

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  • inceince Posts: 289
    46 at rest
  • Paul EPaul E Posts: 2,052
    I need to start using mine again, might use it on the way to work tomorrow
    bartman100 wrote:
    The OP is a troll = moron
    The OP actually believes this = moron
  • dhopedhope Posts: 6,699
    edited July 2011
    According to my phone it's 63. Sitting at my desk.
    Sounds about right, I knew my resting HR wasn't too low.
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  • stuj15stuj15 Posts: 167
    Rich158 wrote:
    Mine never normally gets above 175
    Same here. Although, anything more than 180 and I'm seeing stars and/or blowing ones guts out of ones censored .
  • dhopedhope Posts: 6,699
    mudcow007 wrote:
    using this Graph to gauge how healthy i am, it seems i'm an athlete

    My body fat % puts me into the athlete category. It's just the speed and endurance that lets me down.
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  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    Mine ranges from about 40-44 in the morning after preparing my stuff for work and whilst sitting in front of the telly with a cuppa before leaving, to about 62 or 63 at the most during the day at my desk. Generally whilst at my desk it ranges from about 48-55. No idea what my max HR is, haven't got a HR monitor to take on the bike with me...

    According to your chart thing, mine shouldn't go below 50 at my age (38)... May be I'm going to die...
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    Why is it that whenever I write my age in BR (thirty eight) it comes up as 3 8) ?!?! Oh I see, it's because I put a bracket after the 8.... How weird....
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 18,008
    Mine ranges from about 40-44 in the morning after preparing my stuff for work and whilst sitting in front of the telly with a cuppa before leaving, to about 62 or 63 at the most during the day at my desk. Generally whilst at my desk it ranges from about 48-55. No idea what my max HR is, haven't got a HR monitor to take on the bike with me...

    According to your chart thing, mine shouldn't go below 50 at my age (38)... May be I'm going to die...

    Last time I got my HR checked at the doctor's I kept setting the alarm off on the machine. Haven't checked it for a while, but it's somewhere upper 40s to low 50s, maxing out at low 190s (I think - haven't really pushed myself with a monitor, bar one sprint - on foot - up Dover Park Road in Putney).
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  • Rich158Rich158 Posts: 2,348
    The best way to determine your min HR is to take it every day for a week immediately upon waking and average it out. As for finding your max the only sure fire indication is the test to exhaustion which only really gives you your maximum working HR. I also use my polar monitor (watch based) to take my HR upon waking, any more than a 10% variance over my resting HR and I know fatigue is setting in and it's time to have a day off the bike
    pain is temporary, the glory of beating your mates to the top of the hill lasts forever.....................

    Revised FCN - 2
  • hellshells Posts: 175
    I wouldnt believe your home heart rate monitors tbh they are not very accurate, according to my garmin my resting HR is 42 bpm, according to the pulse ox in the ambulance at work its 58bpm and when I did a 12 lead ECG on myself its 54bpm.
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  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 15,959
    hells wrote:
    I wouldnt believe your home heart rate monitors tbh they are not very accurate, according to my garmin my resting HR is 42 bpm, according to the pulse ox in the ambulance at work its 58bpm and when I did a 12 lead ECG on myself its 54bpm.

    I'd never actually reach my min heart rate other than lying in bed. Besides, I've calculated min heart rate by counting manually and using 3 different HRM units and they are all the same - so I think I will believe my home HRM!

    According to the table I'm better than an athlete! Which shows the table is a bit screwy. I mean, attempting to define categories for age groups when the difference is 1 bpm is clearly nonsense!
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  • Paul EPaul E Posts: 2,052
    I saw 211 on mine this morning during a sprint away from some lights and sustaining just under 30 on the first bit of blackheath this morning, no idea what that means, I did sprint away quite hard
    bartman100 wrote:
    The OP is a troll = moron
    The OP actually believes this = moron
  • optimisticbikeroptimisticbiker Posts: 1,657
    I dont get too fussed on mins and maxs but what is useful is setting up zones 1 - 5 based on your personal min/max (each zone is (max-min)/5 approx bpm) and seeing how long you are in each zone during a ride. On my commute to work, at the beginning of the year i'd be taking 1hr10min and spending 30m+ of that in zone 4 with 2 - 3min in zone 5, now I take 55min and less than 5min is in Zone 4 and none in zone 5 - which is a good indicator of how much fitter i am. How long you stay in the high zones, not the maximum rate you achieve, is the indicator of how hard you are working...
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  • SketchleySketchley Posts: 4,235
    Lowest RHR 41 measured first thing in the morning in bed before getting up.
    High is around 198bpm
    Recovery is pretty quick although never measured it.

    RHR of 41 for an 18stone man is pretty good, what's been interesting is watching it come down from the 90s since I started cycling 3 years ago.
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  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    hells wrote:
    I wouldnt believe your home heart rate monitors tbh they are not very accurate, according to my garmin my resting HR is 42 bpm, according to the pulse ox in the ambulance at work its 58bpm and when I did a 12 lead ECG on myself its 54bpm.

    I don't see how they can be innaccurate, HR isn't very hard to detect, I just count mine for 15 seconds and times by 4, or sometimes for 30 secs and times by 2.... Sometimes I can feel my HR bumping whilst I'm just sitting around and definitely if I go up a hill pushing it hard and then stop at the top - I can see the artery on the inside of my elbow pulsing! All i need to do is count the pulses...

    Blood pressure monitors I can believe may be innaccurate but pulse rate monitors must be pretty straightforward surely?
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  • ConfusedboyConfusedboy Posts: 287
    Don't know what mine is and don't care. I'll worry when it stops altogether; doesn't seem much point until then.

    Now, I am obsessed with trying to increase my average speed....
  • hells wrote:
    I wouldnt believe your home heart rate monitors tbh they are not very accurate, according to my garmin my resting HR is 42 bpm, according to the pulse ox in the ambulance at work its 58bpm and when I did a 12 lead ECG on myself its 54bpm.

    I don't see how they can be innaccurate, HR isn't very hard to detect, I just count mine for 15 seconds and times by 4, or sometimes for 30 secs and times by 2.... Sometimes I can feel my HR bumping whilst I'm just sitting around and definitely if I go up a hill pushing it hard and then stop at the top - I can see the artery on the inside of my elbow pulsing! All i need to do is count the pulses...

    Blood pressure monitors I can believe may be innaccurate but pulse rate monitors must be pretty straightforward surely?
    The chest strap type can be prone to 'static' interference from clothing and also to poor connections... i've seen mine record 190 when i was stationary at the lights and also reord very low values when I've been pedalling. It relies on a good skin contact and on very warm dry days or very cold days that can be hard to get reliably without some contact gel
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  • davmaggsdavmaggs Posts: 1,008
    There's a couple of good books on the subject if it is of interest. Heart Rate Monitors for Compleat Idiots and also books by Sally Edwards. She also posts a lot of stuff on her web site, although it can take some digging.

    What makes the subject interesting to me is that you use the HRM sort of like a rev counter rather than going by how you feel during training, which is prone to all sorts of influences resulting in either under doing it or more likely over doing it on a keen day.

    Ignore any age formulas and vague posters on gym walls.
  • mudcow007mudcow007 Posts: 3,861
    It relies on a good skin contact and on very warm dry days or very cold days that can be hard to get reliably without some contact gel

    does man fur affect them?

    im quite blessed in the chest hair department....?
    Keeping it classy since '83
  • Paul EPaul E Posts: 2,052
    mudcow007 wrote:
    It relies on a good skin contact and on very warm dry days or very cold days that can be hard to get reliably without some contact gel

    does man fur affect them?

    im quite blessed in the chest hair department....?

    You are told to wear them up where you pecs end, I'm not a gorilla but have hair there and it doesn't seem to affect my cateye one.

    I do wet the pads to start with and then sweat takes over but I get a heart rate almost right away, they work better when upto body temp too.
    bartman100 wrote:
    The OP is a troll = moron
    The OP actually believes this = moron
  • for zones etc, I think it's better to do a DIY lactate test to get a rough idea of lactate HR and set zones that way.
  • Rich158Rich158 Posts: 2,348
    davmaggs wrote:
    There's a couple of good books on the subject if it is of interest. Heart Rate Monitors for Compleat Idiots and also books by Sally Edwards. She also posts a lot of stuff on her web site, although it can take some digging.

    What makes the subject interesting to me is that you use the HRM sort of like a rev counter rather than going by how you feel during training, which is prone to all sorts of influences resulting in either under doing it or more likely over doing it on a keen day.

    Ignore any age formulas and vague posters on gym walls.

    I'm not sure I wholly agree with that, HR is merely an indication of how hard you were working and your bodies reaction to the load rather than how hard you're working at any given moment. There's generally a 10-20 second lag where the hr reacts to the increased load which is why power meters have become so popular amongst coaches, you get a real time indication of your output at the wheel instantaneously. I've noticed that when doing interval sessions with intervals of less than 30 secs this can be a real problem which is why I always use RPE in conjunction with my hr monitor. The holy grail would be to add a power meter into the equation, then you can see your power output at any given moment and how your body is reacting to it.

    I won't even go into HR zones here, that could be a whole thread on it's own and is best left to the road section
    pain is temporary, the glory of beating your mates to the top of the hill lasts forever.....................

    Revised FCN - 2
  • davmaggsdavmaggs Posts: 1,008
    Rich158 wrote:
    davmaggs wrote:
    There's a couple of good books on the subject if it is of interest. Heart Rate Monitors for Compleat Idiots and also books by Sally Edwards. She also posts a lot of stuff on her web site, although it can take some digging.

    What makes the subject interesting to me is that you use the HRM sort of like a rev counter rather than going by how you feel during training, which is prone to all sorts of influences resulting in either under doing it or more likely over doing it on a keen day.

    Ignore any age formulas and vague posters on gym walls.

    I'm not sure I wholly agree with that, HR is merely an indication of how hard you were working and your bodies reaction to the load rather than how hard you're working at any given moment. There's generally a 10-20 second lag where the hr reacts to the increased load which is why power meters have become so popular amongst coaches, you get a real time indication of your output at the wheel instantaneously. I've noticed that when doing interval sessions with intervals of less than 30 secs this can be a real problem which is why I always use RPE in conjunction with my hr monitor. The holy grail would be to add a power meter into the equation, then you can see your power output at any given moment and how your body is reacting to it.

    I won't even go into HR zones here, that could be a whole thread on it's own and is best left to the road section

    I agree. I was a little unclear and probably should have used the analogy of a delayed rev counter rather than using the term 'sort of'. As a former runner the delay isn't such a problem.

    The point is that HR training is a means of getting biological feedback as you are training rather than going on a gut feeling or sticking to set routines no matter what state you are in or what you want to achieve.

    If you are a serious about workouts and prepared to train to the feedback you are getting then it is a useful tool. There is an overhead in using one and importantly a mindset so I'd save your cash if you just want to do unstructured stuff.
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