Complete overhaul of my peugeot Etoile

tomcog
tomcog Posts: 105
edited July 2011 in Workshop
Hi All.

Been having a browse on the forum for a few days now..

I have just bought a peugeot Etoile road bike for £10, It works perfectly and runs ok.


DSC02498.jpg

Im looking to perform a complete overhaul of this bike. My aim is to replace some parts and paint up the others. Im thinking of going for a white/Green, White/Red, or White/Purple theme with it.

Im very much a noob at this at this and was just looking for a bit of help in regards to the gears, im a bit worried that if i take them off the bike to spray it, i will really struggle with putting it back together.

Any help with what parts i can replace would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks Guys!
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Comments

  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,888
    best bet is spend a while browsing the repair guides on park tool's website....

    http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help

    ...lots of pics showing how to do stuff, or buy a book on bike maintenance

    replace cables and bar tape, clean/grease wheel bearings etc.

    the rest really depends on what is badly worn or broken
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • Bobbinogs
    Bobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    I am not sure why you want to go for a respray. I think it looks grand as it is. Sure, the bike needs some love and care (new saddle, pedals, handlebar tape, cables and probably/possibly new chain/cassette and tyres, may be/may be not some wheels and a stem too). Also, you can definitely ditch the f/r reflectors but I do quite like the colour scheme. Plenty to be thinking about for now though :)
  • navrig
    navrig Posts: 1,352
    Please don't respray that frame. That's a great colour scheme with a real retro look. Retro is/was in.

    Could do with a new sofa, I mean saddle.
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    Navrig wrote:
    Please don't respray that frame. That's a great colour scheme with a real retro look. Retro is/was in.

    Could do with a new sofa, I mean saddle.

    +2. Clean it up, grease the hubs, headset bearings, see how the bottom bracket feels without the chain attached. If lumpy, sling some gearbox oil down the seat tube and see if it is any better. Clean the frame and polish it, clean the derailleurs, check the cables and replace if necessary, re-assemble and ride. Admire the end result.

    Chances are the only things needing replacing will be the cables and tyres. But note if anything else needs changing, a lot of Peugeot bits are wierd sizes and can be hard to find.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • tomcog
    tomcog Posts: 105
    Thanks guys,

    Im really stuck now whether or not to keep it retro looking or not ??

    I have roughly devised a list of things i want to change on it, here it goes -

    Handlebar Tape
    Saddle
    Pedals
    Wheels
    Tyres
    Brake conversion, from oldschool to aero
    new chain
    Sort out the gears, as they are the only thing letting the bike down at the minute

    I also wouldnt mind replaing the stems and so on, as some of them are fairly rusted.

    Im going to upload some more photos in about 10 :)
  • tomcog
    tomcog Posts: 105
    There we are -

    DSC02504.jpg

    DSC02502.jpg

    DSC02501.jpg

    DSC02500.jpg
  • unixnerd
    unixnerd Posts: 2,864
    I am not sure why you want to go for a respray. I think it looks grand as it is.

    Agreed. Main thing I'd do is fit modern STI shifters and go to a 9 or 10 speed rear.

    I'd love something like that, had a Peugeot as a kid. If you want some inspiration look here:
    http://www.roadcyclinguk.com/gear-news/ ... /4790.html
    I think the white frame with leather saddle and bar tape looks superb.
    http://www.strathspey.co.uk - Quality Binoculars at a Sensible Price.
    Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert 2012, Cannondale CAAD5,
    Marin Mount Vision (1997), Edinburgh Country tourer, 3 cats!
  • tomcog
    tomcog Posts: 105
    How hard is fitting STI shifters, i am a complete novice btw..

    Im really stuck in 2 minds here. The original paint work isnt that good, and if im doing the bike up, i dont want nice shiny new parts, with a poor paint job..
  • unixnerd
    unixnerd Posts: 2,864
    How hard is fitting STI shifters, i am a complete novice btw..

    Not a big deal, they just clamp onto the bars and replace your brake levers. You need to get some cable adaptors that fit onto the bolts used by your current shifters. Any decent supplier should have them cheaply. So a cable and sleeve run from the new shifters to the adaptor and from then on it's bare cable like your existing system.
    http://www.strathspey.co.uk - Quality Binoculars at a Sensible Price.
    Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert 2012, Cannondale CAAD5,
    Marin Mount Vision (1997), Edinburgh Country tourer, 3 cats!
  • tomcog
    tomcog Posts: 105
    Roughly how much is a set going to set me back?

    second hand is fine with me :)

    Thanks,
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    Bobbinogs wrote:

    This is how to do it properly :D
    Faster than a tent.......
  • tomcog
    tomcog Posts: 105
    That bike is lovely!

    Are STI shifters worth getting 2nd hand or should i save for a new set?
  • unixnerd
    unixnerd Posts: 2,864
    Second hand should be fine.
    http://www.strathspey.co.uk - Quality Binoculars at a Sensible Price.
    Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert 2012, Cannondale CAAD5,
    Marin Mount Vision (1997), Edinburgh Country tourer, 3 cats!
  • NervexProf
    NervexProf Posts: 4,202
    Chronicle of my restoration of a Peugeot of the same era here:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/41489547@N ... 335844080/
    Common sense in an uncommon degree is what the world calls wisdom
  • tomcog
    tomcog Posts: 105
    I absoloutly love that!!!!!!!

    Sorry t be a pain, but do you remember where you got most of the bits from? as i hear peugeot stuff is oddly sized, and can be hard to get hold of.

    Can i ask why you didnt fancy STI shifters, as i am unsure whteher to fit them or not?
  • tomcog
    tomcog Posts: 105
    I absoloutly love that!!!!!!!

    Sorry t be a pain, but do you remember where you got most of the bits from? as i hear peugeot stuff is oddly sized, and can be hard to get hold of.

    Can i ask why you didnt fancy STI shifters, as i am unsure whteher to fit them or not?
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    edited June 2011
    downtube shifters more in keeping with the retro look of the bike.

    No reason you can't fit STI shifters instead. You can get barrel adjusters to mount on the downtube shifter bosses.

    I just tarted up an 80's Peugeot Triathlon. Original Campag wheels and chainset still serviceable. Nothing oddly sized about the frame. New 1" threaded Ritchey headset (CRC £10). English thread, 68/107 Shimano UN54 square taper bottom bracket (CRC £17). Alhonga deep drop dual pivot caliper brakes (Spa Cycles £15). M520 SPD pedals (CRC £20) NOS Shimano 600 band-on downtube friction shifters (Spa £17.99) Bar tape and cables from Halfords; job's a goodun.
  • wheelygood
    wheelygood Posts: 101
    If fitting new wheels then worth checking the dropout widths before buying - old ones have different widths to modern ones especailly at the rear. You can get wheels made up on narrower width hubs - just less choice in what you can get. It may affect the number of gears you can fit? As it is a steel frame you can, to a certain extent, the dropouts wider. You may want to get a good framebuilde to do that for you though.
  • NervexProf
    NervexProf Posts: 4,202
    tomcog wrote:
    I absoloutly love that!!!!!!!

    Sorry t be a pain, but do you remember where you got most of the bits from? as i hear peugeot stuff is oddly sized, and can be hard to get hold of.

    Can i ask why you didnt fancy STI shifters, as i am unsure whteher to fit them or not?

    tomcog: Most of the parts are the original, restored using wire wool and a good chrome cleaner.

    I bought new rims and spokes and rebuilt the wheels, cost circa £40. Bought a new Shimano Sora rear mech, cost £17. New pedals e-bay £9 -standard english thread.

    Wireless computer and lights via e-bay £20 and velotex bar tape cost £5.

    Powder coating cost £60 and decals made by a local sign writer, cost £15.

    I preferred NOT to fit STI shifters as this would have meant spreading the rear triangle (imposing unwanted stress) and this would have also meant and new hub and STI cables and brake levers. This would also have made the bike wholly outside the period it was built.
    Common sense in an uncommon degree is what the world calls wisdom
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    You can still find 7 speed STIs which will work with a 7 speed screw on freewheel / 125mm OLN rear hub.

    DT shifters would still look better!
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    keef66 wrote:
    DT shifters would still look better!

    And, in less hilly areas, there is little functional advantage with STIs either.

    Aero levers do offer a bit of advantage in that you get the pivotting that allows effective braking from the hoods. Personally though, I wouldn't bother making the change.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • tomcog
    tomcog Posts: 105
    I see what you are all saying, i just cant get smooth gear changes with DT shifters...

    the peugeot is 12 speed i believe?? it has a sticker with 12 vitesses on it.

    Im tempted to spray it red and white, and stencil peugeot onto the frame.
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    tomcog wrote:
    I see what you are all saying, i just cant get smooth gear changes with DT shifters...

    the peugeot is 12 speed i believe?? it has a sticker with 12 vitesses on it.

    Im tempted to spray it red and white, and stencil peugeot onto the frame.

    Easy to work out - count the number of sprockets - there should be six!

    As for the shifting - you won't get smooth shifting on any system if the cables are knackered. What you need to do is strip everything (except maybe bottom bracket) and clean and regrease it all. Replace brake and gear cables (including outers). Chances are it should all end up running like new.

    As for the paint - go over it with t-cut. Polish the corrosion stains out and wax it. It will look so much better hopefully you'll realise you don't want to repaint it.

    @Nervex Prof

    This is a Peugeot I renovated. Same paint job which I think is pretty cool - I wouldn't have repainted it! This frame is a bit more upmarket than yours though - a Triathlon in Reynolds 531. Lacks the uneccessary flourishes of your original paint job. The colour scheme is actually from one of the Tour de France pro bikes of the time.

    P1070388.jpg
    Faster than a tent.......
  • Bobbinogs
    Bobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    ooh. I like that!

    I agree with the comments about DT shifting. If it is set up right with decent cables and good lube then it can be very good with that additional magic ingredient...technique. I am still learning it but getting better and better. You do need to think ahead a bit more (no easy flick to get out of trouble) but I have found that it has made me better at changing whether DT or STI.

    The additional benefits are that friction shifting stays true 100% of the time, no lazy shifting or re-indexing. Don't get me wrong, well set up STI is great but having an enjoyable spin on a lovely bike is not dependent on it.
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    Nice isn't it. Unfortunately it is a good friends late fathers bike so I got a few rides out of it and then handed it over. It's a really nice thing to ride - kit is Shimano 105 with Biopace.

    Basically, the only real drawback to dt shifters is if you need to change gear when stood on the pedals (ie when running out of steam on a steep climb). Then you really miss STI shifters. Those who have never familiarised themselves with dt shifters don't know what they are missing.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • kettrinboy
    kettrinboy Posts: 613
    Ive recently changed the 30 ish yr old Suntour 6 speed freewheel on my old Raleigh RRA with a modern 6 speed Shimano i got from Evans, and it has improved shifting no end , particularly when going up the block, a quick sharp movement of the lever works a lot better than a slow movement when going up the block ive found.
  • tomcog
    tomcog Posts: 105
    Ok, i have been looking for DT shifters, and they are almot as much as STI shifters!!

    Im in a masssive muddle here, in regards to changing the gearing system.

    I have 3 options
    1 - Use all off the stuff i have clean it all and fit it back on.
    2 - Convert to STI shifters with new casssette and chain ring. Mega £££
    3 - New DT Shifters with new casssette and chain ring.

    All i really want from this upgrade, is to make the bike look nicer, and run much better.

    I havent got the money to spend £££££ on things, so i would be hoping to look for most of it second hand, or things on offer!

    My fairly local bike shop offered me £600 for a full refit and upgrade, tbh i would rather buy a new bike..

    I want to try and limit myself to spending around £250 on this total.

    so far i have spent about £6 on paint.

    Thanks All,
  • NervexProf
    NervexProf Posts: 4,202
    Shifters here:

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Suntour-Accushift ... 1c1cc43a72

    Commend you stick with existing components, lots of TLC - keep the bike in period.
    Common sense in an uncommon degree is what the world calls wisdom
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    tomcog wrote:
    My fairly local bike shop offered me £600 for a full refit and upgrade, tbh i would rather buy a new bike..

    They shouldn't really have quoted. Spend that and you'd still have a hundred quid bike.

    As to your options - you haven't much money. You don't mention if you have much time but, assuming you have some, option 1) is the only logical approach followed by option 3 if it isn't running satisfactorily after you've cleaned everything up.

    I would suggest you strip the bike down, label the parts so you know where they come from, photograph the assemblies as you dismantle them so you know what it should look like when it goes back together again and post plenty of questions on here if you are in any doubt at all as to whether you are doing it right!

    Get some degreaser and an old toothbrush to clean the parts and post pics when you are done. On reassembly, mMake sure that what needs grease gets grease and what needs oil gets that too. Personally, I get far more satisfaction cleaning up original parts and refitting them than I do just buying some new part and fitting it.

    Get lots of pictures in detail before you strip it as well - so you can see how much better it looks after you've put a bit of time into it.
    Faster than a tent.......