What to upgrade

knownothingbozo
knownothingbozo Posts: 168
edited May 2011 in Road buying advice
Below are the spcs of my first ever road bike, which has well and truly given me the bug for riding.
I know that Pinnacle will cut their budgets on some parts in order to give better parts elsewhere, but by looking at these specs what should I consider for upgrade (if anything)?
What I am interested in, as any upgrade that would increase performance (I'm not part of the specs and working on that upgrade as a seperatre matter thank you!) or capability of the bike.
Frame: Pinnacle 7005 Custom Butted Alloy
Fork: Pinnacle Carbon Blade with Alloy Steerer
Front Derailleur: Shimano 105
Rear Derailleur: Shimano 105
Shifters: Shimano 105
Chainset: Shimano R4550 Compact
Chainrings: 34/50 tooth Chainrings
Bottom Bracket: Included with Crank
Cassette: Shimano 105
Chain: KMC DX10SC
Pedals: Shimano A520 (replaced originals)
Front Brake: Forged Alloy Long Reach
Rear Brake: Forged Alloy Long Reach
Brake Levers: Integrated with Shifter
Handlebars: Pinnacle 6061 Double Butted Alloy 31.8mm
Stem: 3D-Forged 31.8mm
Headset: VP Intelliset
Grips: Black Pinnacle Gel Tape
Rims: A-Class ALX200
Front Hub: A-Class ALX200
Rear Hub: A-Class ALX200
Tyres: Kenda Kwick Roller
Saddle: San-Marco Ponza Power
Seatpost: Pinnacle 27.2mm Alloy
Seat Binder: 31.8mm Allen Bolt
Weight: Approx. 21lbs (9.53kg) for the Large Size.

Use of the bike is for fitness, rides ranging from 10 miles after work upwards, with aspirations towards 100 mile sportives at some point.
Budget is an issue, so I suppose the big question is what will give me the best, most useful upgrade for my money?

Thanks.
Some people are like slinkies - not much use for anything, but they bring a smile to your face when you push them down the stairs.

http://knownothingbozoandhisbike.blogspot.com/

Comments

  • kfinlay
    kfinlay Posts: 763
    I'd say start with new tyres - GP4000S or Pro Race 3's as they will reduce weight on the out part of the wheel and probably give a better ride/grip than you existing tyres.
    If budget allows then better wheels too, Planet X model B's or maybe Pro-Lite Bracciano or Merano are all good value. Higher up the price range consider Shimnao RS80s.
    The only other thing I'd say from that is make sure the bike is setup properly for you especially if your planning 100 mile rides. A bike can be comfortable for a couple of hours but be a real pain after 5-6hrs.
    There's plenty more you can do - plenty others will be along with their recomendations :D

    Personally I go my bike fitting me first then got tyres then got wheels, each saw a bit of an improvement but I'm no racer. It definitely helped me enjoy my cycling and encouraged me to go further and (a wee bit) faster.

    HTH
    Kev

    Summer Bike: Colnago C60
    Winter Bike: Vitus Alios
    MTB: 1997 GT Karakorum
  • solsurf
    solsurf Posts: 489
    tyres gp4000s can make a huge difference to the handling. wheels if you can afford it. Also something as simple as some nice handlebar tape with some gel patches can make it more comfortable without breaking the bank.

    One thing I would recommend, is some decent bib shorts, nice top, arm warmers and gilet to get the most out of your bike and then just enjoy!

    the only problem then is once you like it you will rapidly find the end of your bank account.
  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    +1 tyres and wheels. Don't bother with anything else unless it's a fit/comfort issue or worn-out. Upgrading other parts frankly is a waste of money as it'll make negligible difference.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • Bobbinogs
    Bobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    Yepp, tyres (gp4000s...lovely, lovely) and if your brake blocks are the cartridge type then change the pads with some from Koolstop (the dual compound ones are ace and can be bought from i-ride).
  • yaya
    yaya Posts: 411
    Tyres for sure, if you're looking for extra comfort then maybe a carbon seatpost and a saddle...but careful with the saddle, once you start trying them, it never ends...at least for me:-)
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    +1 for getting conti gp400s's

    Apart from say, new wheels - you wont notice if you swapped anything else over.
  • Thanks everybody, tyres it is then.
    Good example of a newbie here - tyres are the one thing I didn't even consider would make much difference. I've a lot to learn.
    Some people are like slinkies - not much use for anything, but they bring a smile to your face when you push them down the stairs.

    http://knownothingbozoandhisbike.blogspot.com/
  • dawebbo
    dawebbo Posts: 456
    +1 for GP4000S, super grippy and roll really well.

    +1 Also on Solsurf's point on getting nice kit - getting stuff that fits well will help too (you may already have this), flapping tops etc slow you down loads.
  • After good advice from the replies here, started looking at the GP4000s tyres, and notice that there are 23mm and 25 mm, WTF? What's the difference? (I know size is the difference) but what I mean is what's the benefit of one over the other?
    I have searched the internet and found various forums about this, ignoring the bolshy ones, still can't find a definitive answer.

    Is it that there is no such thing? easy to say personal preference is important when every penny counts, and thus choices of what to upgrade have to be very carefully considered.

    As you can see, knownothingbozo is my real name.
    Some people are like slinkies - not much use for anything, but they bring a smile to your face when you push them down the stairs.

    http://knownothingbozoandhisbike.blogspot.com/
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    After good advice from the replies here, started looking at the GP4000s tyres, and notice that there are 23mm and 25 mm, WTF? What's the difference? (I know size is the difference) but what I mean is what's the benefit of one over the other?

    Tyre width. Narrower supposedly = racier but it is a bit complicated. Basically, on cruddy UK roads, 25mm will be fine (slightly more comfortable) with the proviso that if, come winter, you want to put crud racer mudguards on your bike to stop you and the bike getting covered with, well, crud, they won't fit if you have 25mm tyres.

    So, if you intend to fit crud racers (forum search for more info on those - there is a huge thread) - 23mm.

    If you have a winter bike or like getting a damp backside when the roads are wet - 25mm.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • solsurf
    solsurf Posts: 489
    what rolf f said, I have the 23 by the way and they are fine on the lakes roads and they do fit the fantastic crud mudguards. Let us know how you get on.

    Oh yes did you get yourself any new clothing? It really does help. Saying that you may allready have it.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    For the bike, just tyres.

    Get a fit at www.cadencesport.co.uk

    Some good clothing.

    Everything else on the bike is absolutely fine.
  • Yes, clothing was one of the first things I got, bib shorts, tight tops, all lycrad up. Thought I'd feel a pratt, but actually there seems so many people out on the road (friendly bunch to) all with similar kit, I actually feel pretty good. Slightly baulked at the potential cost, but some good second hand buys on jerseys from ebay, allowed me to spend a bit more to keep the bum comfy.

    To make complete sense of the tyres, my bike is capable of having mudguards fitted and has long reach brakes (see I am learning something) so it appears I do have a choice already. Then as if to just confirm, I checked the tyres already on it, and find they are 26's, almost mountain bike like!

    So come pay day, and a bit of ingratiating myself to my beautiful wife etc I will go for the gp4000s, size 25.

    Thanks to everyone for their advice.
    Some people are like slinkies - not much use for anything, but they bring a smile to your face when you push them down the stairs.

    http://knownothingbozoandhisbike.blogspot.com/
  • Never thought I'd ever be using baby wipes again at my age but following other advice on one of the forums, my bike now smells lovely!
    Some people are like slinkies - not much use for anything, but they bring a smile to your face when you push them down the stairs.

    http://knownothingbozoandhisbike.blogspot.com/
  • Barteos
    Barteos Posts: 657
    After good advice from the replies here, started looking at the GP4000s tyres, and notice that there are 23mm and 25 mm, WTF? What's the difference? (I know size is the difference) but what I mean is what's the benefit of one over the other?
    I have searched the internet and found various forums about this, ignoring the bolshy ones, still can't find a definitive answer.

    25mm is what you want. 23mm will be just less comfortable and grippy, not faster.
  • BrianTrousers
    BrianTrousers Posts: 218
    http://www.merlincycles.co.uk/Bike+Shop/Tyres++Tubes/Road+Tyres++Tubes/Continental+Road+Tyres/Continental+GP+4000S+Folding+Tyre_1528.htm

    Join their VIP club and get another 10% off. Mine came within two days of ordering. I challenge you to find cheaper. Merlin are brilliant.

    25mm all the way, huge difference and much comfier than 23mm.
  • Chip \'oyler
    Chip \'oyler Posts: 2,323
    Best upgrade for your money? A coach who'll write you a structured training plan.
    Expertly coached by http://www.vitessecyclecoaching.co.uk/

    http://vineristi.wordpress.com - the blog for Viner owners and lovers!