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It's here...Plane tree dust storm

greg66_tri_v2.0greg66_tri_v2.0 Posts: 7,172
edited April 2011 in Commuting chat
and I hate it.

The first filaments were spotted on my car this morning as I wheeled the bike out, and there were little piles of it by the side of the road. There's a sign on Viccy Embankment about it being a dust suppression trial area. Bet that works. Not.

Really need the wind to drop and a spot of rain to wash the bloody stuff away.
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  • cjcpcjcp Posts: 13,345
    Classic. I actually thought of this on tonight's commute home.
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  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 17,948
    Should be some rain on Friday. Fingers crossed for a proper downpour.
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  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,683
    Yup the car and conservatory are covered added to which we have the rape pollen and whatever the shite they're spraying on the fields at the moment :evil:

    Also what are those black slow flying wasp like things that are everywhere?
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  • cjcpcjcp Posts: 13,345
    itboffin wrote:
    Yup the car and conservatory are covered added to which we have the rape pollen and whatever the shite they're spraying on the fields at the moment :evil:

    Also what are those black slow flying wasp like things that are everywhere?

    I think I'd come out in hives if I lived in the country.
    FCN 2-4.

    "What happens when the hammer goes down, kids?"
    "It stays down, Daddy."
    "Exactly."
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    The Plane tree pollen has started to give me a slight hayfever in the last couple of years, I get a slight itching round the nose and it feels like there's a lot of dust around my eyes. At least it's fairly breezy at the moment so it'll blow away....
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  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    I read that part of the problem is that councils and other people responsible for planting in parks etc tend to plant male trees which send out pollen (like tree sperm) because female trees drop a lot of those small spiky balls (fruit) which cost councils a lot to clear up, whereas male trees don't (or something like that), the downside is that there are lots of pollen producing male trees across London.....
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  • t4tomot4tomo Posts: 2,643
    cjcp wrote:
    I think I'd come out in hives if I lived in the country.

    I only started to get hayfever when I moved to the city, I don't think pollution and pollen are a good mix.
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  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 17,948
    You also don't tend to get that many plane trees in the countryside. They are planted a lot in urban areas because they are very resistant to poor soil conditions, drought, insect attack and air pollution - pretty much plant and forget compared with more delicate species. The little fibres aren't pollen, but part of the trees protection against pollution - particles stick to the hairs, which are then shed, a bit like the bark, which continuously flakes off.
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  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    quote="t4tomo"]
    cjcp wrote:
    I think I'd come out in hives if I lived in the country.

    I only started to get hayfever when I moved to the city, I don't think pollution and pollen are a good mix.[/quote]

    Yeah, I think there's increasing hayfever in cities largely because of the increase in PM10 particles and other pollutants in the air, hayfever isn't just caused by plants....
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  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    rjsterry wrote:
    You also don't tend to get that many plane trees in the countryside. They are planted a lot in urban areas because they are very resistant to poor soil conditions, drought, insect attack and air pollution - pretty much plant and forget compared with more delicate species. The little fibres aren't pollen, but part of the trees protection against pollution - particles stick to the hairs, which are then shed, a bit like the bark, which continuously flakes off.

    The bark flaking off Plane trees is the way the cope with high pollution levels in cities, they "sweat" the pollution into the bark and then drop the bark off, that's what makes them so good for urban environments....
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  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 17,948
    And if you want to see just how badly polluted London air is have a look at the LAQN statistics.

    http://www.londonair.org.uk/london/asp/publicstats.asp

    The red spots on the map show where pollution limits have been exceeded (mainly for NO₂ from a quick look) - i.e. most of central London and a fair bit of the outer boroughs too.
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  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    rjsterry wrote:
    And if you want to see just how badly polluted London air is have a look at the LAQN statistics.

    http://www.londonair.org.uk/london/asp/publicstats.asp

    The red spots on the map show where pollution limits have been exceeded - i.e. most of central London and a fair bit of the outer boroughs too.

    Apparently the EU has had to change the rules slightly so that we don't have another £300m fine or whatever it is, which we got slapped with last year (paid for by taxpayers). We have another 3 months or something to bring pollution levels to within safe limits. Since BoZo came to power there has been an increase in London pollution and we are now heading for our 2nd massive fine from the EU. Never happened under Ken. Bozo really is the motorists mayor.... Last weekend there was an actual health/smog warning across London it got so bad!
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  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    What to the what now? "Plane tree dust storm".... Must be a middle class thing because I haven't a clue what you're talking about.

    Is it the stuff that makes me sneeze and curl into a ball of crippling pain? I thought that was flowers, grass and hay. Don't see how though I live in London its all concrete round here...
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  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    DonDaddyD wrote:
    What to the what now? "Plane tree dust storm".... Must be a middle class thing because I haven't a clue what you're talking about.

    Is it the stuff that makes me sneeze and curl into a ball of crippling pain? I thought that was flowers, grass and hay. Don't see how though I live in London its all concrete round here...

    Yeah, it's well known that only middle class people suffer from Plane Tree pollen. It's a very class aware tree....

    As discussed, most "hay"fever in London is actually brought on by man made pollutants and PM10s and pollen just exacerbates things. I've got a few friends in London who have only begun to suffer from "hay"fever since they arrived in the big bad city.... It's a fallacy that it's worse in teh country...
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  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    DonDaddyD wrote:
    What to the what now? "Plane tree dust storm".... Must be a middle class thing because I haven't a clue what you're talking about.

    Is it the stuff that makes me sneeze and curl into a ball of crippling pain? I thought that was flowers, grass and hay. Don't see how though I live in London its all concrete round here...

    Yeah, it's well known that only middle class people suffer from Plane Tree pollen. It's a very class aware tree....

    As discussed, most "hay"fever in London is actually brought on by man made pollutants and PM10s and pollen just exacerbates things. I've got a few friends in London who have only begun to suffer from "hay"fever since they arrived in the big bad city.... It's a fallacy that it's worse in teh country...

    It's not worse in the Country. It's only worse in the Country when you are already suffering and the pollen, as you said, compounds on it. But stay in the Country a few days and you'll notice the difference.

    I also don't get Hayfever in other hot countries or in tropical climates where there is lots of pollen, trees, grass and green stuff.

    What really gets me, is when I go from hot outside to supercold air con inside or visa versa.
    Food Chain number = 4

    A true scalp is not only overtaking someone but leaving them stopped at a set of lights. As you, who have clearly beaten the lights, pummels nothing but the open air ahead. ~ 'DondaddyD'. Player of the Unspoken Game
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 17,948
    Different pollen innit. I have a Mexican friend who suffers really badly with hayfever in this country, but never had any symptoms before moving to this country. He lives in semi-rural South Gloucestershire. Depressingly, the littl'un is already showing signs that she has inherited at least some of my allergies.
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  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    DonDaddyD wrote:
    DonDaddyD wrote:
    What to the what now? "Plane tree dust storm".... Must be a middle class thing because I haven't a clue what you're talking about.

    Is it the stuff that makes me sneeze and curl into a ball of crippling pain? I thought that was flowers, grass and hay. Don't see how though I live in London its all concrete round here...

    Yeah, it's well known that only middle class people suffer from Plane Tree pollen. It's a very class aware tree....

    As discussed, most "hay"fever in London is actually brought on by man made pollutants and PM10s and pollen just exacerbates things. I've got a few friends in London who have only begun to suffer from "hay"fever since they arrived in the big bad city.... It's a fallacy that it's worse in teh country...

    It's not worse in the Country. It's only worse in the Country when you are already suffering and the pollen, as you said, compounds on it. But stay in the Country a few days and you'll notice the difference.

    I also don't get Hayfever in other hot countries or in tropical climates where there is lots of pollen, trees, grass and green stuff.

    What really gets me, is when I go from hot outside to supercold air con inside or visa versa.

    No it's not worse in the country... It's pretty common in Australia apparently, I was reading that Sydney has some of the worst hayfever in the world. Going from hot outside to super chilled inside and getting the sniffles probably isn't hayfever
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  • cjcpcjcp Posts: 13,345
    I'd still get hives. The countryside is like space: no-one can you scream. Can you imagine bumping into ITB on a track one cold, dark evening?
    FCN 2-4.

    "What happens when the hammer goes down, kids?"
    "It stays down, Daddy."
    "Exactly."
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    cjcp wrote:
    I'd still get hives. The countryside is like space: no-one can you scream. Can you imagine bumping into ITB on a track one cold, dark evening?

    I've got a friend like you. He has a panic attack if he strays too far from buildings and concrete. I remember going on a drving trip round the SE/Kent/Surrey etc a few years back. A friend of mine had just passed her test so we hired a car, a few of us jumped in and drove around the country, stopping for tea and cakes etc here and there in little villages. Eventually we got to Tunbridge Wells or something and one of my friends exclaimed "Oh thank god, a Topshop, back to civilisation"....
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  • cjcpcjcp Posts: 13,345
    cjcp wrote:
    I'd still get hives. The countryside is like space: no-one can you scream. Can you imagine bumping into ITB on a track one cold, dark evening?

    I've got a friend like you. He has a panic attack if he strays too far from buildings and concrete. I remember going on a drving trip round the SE/Kent/Surrey etc a few years back. A friend of mine had just passed her test so we hired a car, a few of us jumped in and drove around the country, stopping for tea and cakes etc here and there in little villages. Eventually we got to Tunbridge Wells or something and one of my friends exclaimed "Oh thank god, a Topshop, back to civilisation"....

    Quite. Don't you get sensory deprivation when you stray too far into the greener parts, where people start to say things like "Oooo, aaar" and what not?

    I've seen The Wicker Man. Very scary. Put me off the countryside for life.

    I've also noticed that, when there's no cloud, you get these sparkly things appear in the sky, too. They're don't move either, not like the lights on aeroplanes. Weird.
    FCN 2-4.

    "What happens when the hammer goes down, kids?"
    "It stays down, Daddy."
    "Exactly."
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 17,948
    edited April 2011
    cjcp wrote:
    cjcp wrote:
    I'd still get hives. The countryside is like space: no-one can you scream. Can you imagine bumping into ITB on a track one cold, dark evening?

    I've got a friend like you. He has a panic attack if he strays too far from buildings and concrete. I remember going on a drving trip round the SE/Kent/Surrey etc a few years back. A friend of mine had just passed her test so we hired a car, a few of us jumped in and drove around the country, stopping for tea and cakes etc here and there in little villages. Eventually we got to Tunbridge Wells or something and one of my friends exclaimed "Oh thank god, a Topshop, back to civilisation"....

    Quite. Don't you get sensory deprivation when you stray too far into the greener parts, where people start to say things like "Oooo, aaar" and what not?

    I've seen The Wicker Man. Very scary. Put me off the countryside for life.

    I've also noticed that, when there's no cloud, you get these sparkly things appear in the sky, too. They're don't move either, not like the lights on aeroplanes. Weird.

    Oh, it's fine really, so long as you are on the outside lobbing the flaming torches. It's all for the greater good. :wink:
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  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    cjcp wrote:
    cjcp wrote:
    I'd still get hives. The countryside is like space: no-one can you scream. Can you imagine bumping into ITB on a track one cold, dark evening?

    I've got a friend like you. He has a panic attack if he strays too far from buildings and concrete. I remember going on a drving trip round the SE/Kent/Surrey etc a few years back. A friend of mine had just passed her test so we hired a car, a few of us jumped in and drove around the country, stopping for tea and cakes etc here and there in little villages. Eventually we got to Tunbridge Wells or something and one of my friends exclaimed "Oh thank god, a Topshop, back to civilisation"....

    Quite. Don't you get sensory deprivation when you stray too far into the greener parts, where people start to say things like "Oooo, aaar" and what not?

    I've seen The Wicker Man. Very scary. Put me off the countryside for life.

    I've also noticed that, when there's no cloud, you get these sparkly things appear in the sky, too. They're don't move either, not like the lights on aeroplanes. Weird.

    I like the country! But things like Wicker Man and Tubs etc from League of Gentleman could put me off...!

    What are these sparkly things?!
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  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    Going from hot outside to super chilled inside and getting the sniffles probably isn't hayfever

    Nah, I'm talking about sneezing fit of epic proportions. Many times I've been seen sneezing outside a shop with people stepping off the curb trying to avoid whatever it is I've got.

    Sometimes I wonder if someone'll hit me over the head while mistakenly thinking they've just saved the planet from a potential sneezing zombie outbreak.
    Food Chain number = 4

    A true scalp is not only overtaking someone but leaving them stopped at a set of lights. As you, who have clearly beaten the lights, pummels nothing but the open air ahead. ~ 'DondaddyD'. Player of the Unspoken Game
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    DonDaddyD wrote:
    Going from hot outside to super chilled inside and getting the sniffles probably isn't hayfever

    Nah, I'm talking about sneezing fit of epic proportions. Many times I've been seen sneezing outside a shop with people stepping off the curb trying to avoid whatever it is I've got.

    Sometimes I wonder if someone'll hit me over the head while mistakenly thinking they've just saved the planet from a potential sneezing zombie outbreak.

    I get sneeze attacks when I go from dark or shady conditions into bright sunlight... It's bizarre!
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  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 17,948
    cjcp wrote:
    cjcp wrote:
    I'd still get hives. The countryside is like space: no-one can you scream. Can you imagine bumping into ITB on a track one cold, dark evening?

    I've got a friend like you. He has a panic attack if he strays too far from buildings and concrete. I remember going on a drving trip round the SE/Kent/Surrey etc a few years back. A friend of mine had just passed her test so we hired a car, a few of us jumped in and drove around the country, stopping for tea and cakes etc here and there in little villages. Eventually we got to Tunbridge Wells or something and one of my friends exclaimed "Oh thank god, a Topshop, back to civilisation"....

    Quite. Don't you get sensory deprivation when you stray too far into the greener parts, where people start to say things like "Oooo, aaar" and what not?

    I've seen The Wicker Man. Very scary. Put me off the countryside for life.

    I've also noticed that, when there's no cloud, you get these sparkly things appear in the sky, too. They're don't move either, not like the lights on aeroplanes. Weird.

    I like the country! But things like Wicker Man and Tubs etc from League of Gentleman could put me off...!

    What are these sparkly things?!

    Little holes in the big blackout blind in the sky, of course. If you find the countryside makes you nervous, I'd recommend not taking part in night hikes, but once you get away from street lights, a clear night sky is absolutely stunning.
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    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • nichnich Posts: 888
    Eyes and head are fecked right now :(

    I have an office job, but I wonder whether the horrible pollen 'n censored has got inside the building, arghhh :?
  • I get sneeze attacks when I go from dark or shady conditions into bright sunlight... It's bizarre!

    I get that as well. Apparently it's some sort of thing where your brain is wired mildly incorrectly. Or something. In any case, it's guaranteed that if I go into bright light from the shade, I will sneeze exactly twice, no more, no less.
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  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    rjsterry wrote:
    cjcp wrote:
    cjcp wrote:
    I'd still get hives. The countryside is like space: no-one can you scream. Can you imagine bumping into ITB on a track one cold, dark evening?

    I've got a friend like you. He has a panic attack if he strays too far from buildings and concrete. I remember going on a drving trip round the SE/Kent/Surrey etc a few years back. A friend of mine had just passed her test so we hired a car, a few of us jumped in and drove around the country, stopping for tea and cakes etc here and there in little villages. Eventually we got to Tunbridge Wells or something and one of my friends exclaimed "Oh thank god, a Topshop, back to civilisation"....

    Quite. Don't you get sensory deprivation when you stray too far into the greener parts, where people start to say things like "Oooo, aaar" and what not?

    I've seen The Wicker Man. Very scary. Put me off the countryside for life.

    I've also noticed that, when there's no cloud, you get these sparkly things appear in the sky, too. They're don't move either, not like the lights on aeroplanes. Weird.

    I like the country! But things like Wicker Man and Tubs etc from League of Gentleman could put me off...!

    What are these sparkly things?!

    Little holes in the big blackout blind in the sky, of course. If you find the countryside makes you nervous, I'd recommend not taking part in night hikes, but once you get away from street lights, a clear night sky is absolutely stunning.

    Oh you mean stars... Sorry bit slow today. I remember when I 1st noticed the actual proper night sky away from towns and cities. I'd gone to Snowdon to walk up the mountain at night (!) and we got out of the car when we arrived and my mouth just fell open - you could literally see swirls of stars in galaxy formation etc, literally hundreds and hundreds of thousands of them! In London if you look up, you're lucky if you can see 1 star!
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  • turnerjohnturnerjohn Posts: 1,249
    got a field of Oil Seed Rape just over the garden...winds blown all the dam pollen all over my car :evil: ...must have washed it a few times a week !
  • ConfusedboyConfusedboy Posts: 287
    Be grateful for your Plane trees, despite the dust. They are brilliant for absorbing CO2 and releasing Oxygen in urban environments. They are a hybrid bred in Victorian times for that very purpose. Clever Victorians.
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