Carbon seat post and handlebars - much more comfortable?

CarlosDSanchez
CarlosDSanchez Posts: 455
edited March 2011 in Road buying advice
Hi, I've been doing a 43 mile round trip commute on my Cube Agree SL, mostly country lanes and B roads which are in pretty poor condition. My ar5e and wrists seem to be getting quite a hammering and I was wondering if swapping my ally seat post and bars for carbon would make much difference to comfort?

Is there a sweet spot for price/performance of these things?

I already use padded shorts, gel inserts under the bar tape and gloves with gel inserts on the palms.
Dolan Preffisio
2010 Cube Agree SL

Comments

  • flasher
    flasher Posts: 1,734
    I'd try lower psi. to start with.........
  • Squillinossett
    Squillinossett Posts: 1,678
    Not really no.

    I chost my carbon Zipp bar/stem combo as they are SUPER stiff, not comfey.

    I changed my seatpost from a Tomopson Alu one to Carbon, and notice nothing between the two.
  • dennisn
    dennisn Posts: 10,601
    Not really no.

    I chost my carbon Zipp bar/stem combo as they are SUPER stiff, not comfey.

    I changed my seatpost from a Tomopson Alu one to Carbon, and notice nothing between the two.

    +1..... no difference. Now a suspension seatpost, that's another story.
  • Squillinossett
    Squillinossett Posts: 1,678
    dennisn wrote:
    Not really no.

    I chost my carbon Zipp bar/stem combo as they are SUPER stiff, not comfey.

    I changed my seatpost from a Tomopson Alu one to Carbon, and notice nothing between the two.

    +1..... no difference. Now a suspension seatpost, that's another story.

    I couldnt cope wit hthe shame.... :oops:
  • danowat
    danowat Posts: 2,877
    Flasher wrote:
    I'd try lower psi. to start with.........

    This, and maybe wider tyres.

    I have carbon bars and seatpost, and they are no more, or less, comfortable than alu ones.
  • marcusjb
    marcusjb Posts: 2,412
    As others have suggested, lower pressure and/or wider tyres will make a world of difference to comfort - and a lot cheaper than a new stem/bar/seat post set-up!

    Obviously, you need to have the clearances for a fat tyre - but even a 25mm tyre gives you a real increase in comfort.

    Having spent years riding 23mm tyres, I am currently commuting on a Pompino with 28mm tyres - what a diffference! Next road bike is being built up to take 28mm with guards for year round comfort.

    The only place a suspension seatpost can possibly be used without crushing humiliation is the stoker's saddle on a tandem.
  • Maybe try trying a few different saddles.
    Saddles are such an individual thing, so maybe try a different one, it might make a big difference.
    "That's it! You people have stood in my way long enough. I'm going to clown college! " - Homer
  • FransJacques
    FransJacques Posts: 2,148
    Not on your effing life.

    I'll pay anyone £100k of my hard earned money if they can prove to me they can tell.
    When a cyclist has a disagreement with a car; it's not who's right, it's who's left.
  • UpTheWall
    UpTheWall Posts: 207
    Having gone through aches and pains all over for one reason or another I have some suggestions:

    Have you been measured up properly for a bike fitting? Perhaps you need to reconsider your position?

    Wrist pain could imply too much weight going through your arms?

    Also, what position are your wrists - are they bent or straight? If bent then try to straighten them so the joint is under less pressure.

    What exactly is the type of pain?

    As for ass trouble, I've posted on this at more length before, but where do you sit on the saddle? Is your weight on the sit bones?

    Is your saddle the right width for your butt? Specialized's butt-o-meter (I kid you not) is behind the desk in most Evans shops.

    I probably shouldn't ask, but exactly where is the butt pain?!

    Another obvious question - have you dived right in after time out from riding, or has it been built up gradually?

    If you really want to go the softer ride way, I suggest specialized's new zertz inserts. I've tried a roubaix with these in the seatpost and fork and the ride was so comfortable it was almost spongey. But I'd really look at your position and weight distribution first; that's much much more likely to be the problem.

    Also, sugoi's shorts are the mutt's nuts for sensitive butts. Friends also recommend Assos for a quality chamois.

    hope that's useful for you.

    Si
  • dcj
    dcj Posts: 395
    edited March 2011
    the variety of experiences on this page indicate there is no right or wrong answer.

    for me the road buzz fatigue after a couple of hours riding is notably reduced but obviously it doesn't work like that for alot of riders.

    the carbon bars i use are more flexy which probably helps comfort. most pros don't use carbon bars because comfort isn't their top priority and nor is saving weight.
    its very obvious how much stiffer the alloy equivalent of the same make and bar shape is when comparing: in my case 3T compact 42 width.

    I would first try 300tpi+ 25mm tyres if you are on 23mm.

    i am going back to tubs on both my bikes this year which can further reduce the buzz on secondary asphalt roads.
  • Have only had the bike since mid December and only been riding it since January due to the bad weather. Have already cover 1000 miles on it though (I have a 43 mile round trip commute) Have moved up from specialized sirrius which had 28mm tyres and was pretty comfortable over the rough stuff, still use it for load lugging but compared to the new bike if feels heavy and slow so I wouldn't use it for the full round trip.

    No lasting pain on the butt or in the wrists, just uncomfortable on the 5 mile bit of the commute with really rough road, sounds like I should be looking at saddles and maybe using a wider tyre.

    cheers for all the advice folks.
    Dolan Preffisio
    2010 Cube Agree SL