Perineum friendly saddle

haggisinlondon
haggisinlondon Posts: 171
edited November 2010 in Road buying advice
Done around 5000 miles on my Bontanger saddle that came with my bike but been getting a lot of numbness lately and with family planning on the horizon I need to ensure my "boys" can swim.

Been looking at a replacement saddle that will help me protect what I have. Been looking at the Specialized saddles, are there some others I should be looking at?
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Comments

  • The Selle SMP ones are marketed as being specifically for that purpose (preventing numb and damaged bits)

    Odd looking, and I've not tried one, but supposedly good things.
    Open One+ BMC TE29 Seven 622SL On One Scandal Cervelo RS
  • I use a Spesh Toupe Ti 155 from 2008 and have covered many miles without any issues whatsoever. Highly recommended.

    Go and get your 'sit bones' measured on one of Specialized BG Fit boards and get the corresponding saddle wdith. Hey presto, no more numbness.
  • Should have added I am on a tight budget, the SMP's looked very expensive. May go for the Spesh, but was looking at getting a used version on ebay, to make sure it was comfortable. I am guessing I could measure my sit bones myself?
  • hopper1
    hopper1 Posts: 4,389
    I used to suffer the numbness, but then got a Toupe Team... Now have Spesh BG saddles on all bikes.
    Go to the shop and get measured, then buy a correct width saddle from ebay :wink:
    Start with a budget, finish with a mortgage!
  • ScottieP
    ScottieP Posts: 599
    +1 on the Specialized saddles - I'm using a Phenom SL on my bike and just bought an unused standard phenom off ebay as well. They're good saddles.
    My cycling blog: http://girodilento.com/
  • You could try looking at Topeak Allay saddles.

    I suffered for a number of years with chronic nerve pain and numbness from pressure on the saddle and despite following numerous suggestions for numerous saddles, nothing worked and I had to contemplate giving up cycling altogether. I even went onto a course of neuropathic painkillers and considered cortisone lumber injections but all these were capable of doing was blocking the pain signals and not stopping potential nerve damage or other damage in that area.

    Got my hands on a Topeak Allay Racing Sport saddle and from the first ride the pain was gone. They can be awkward to set up and there's initially more pressure on your sit bones but once you've got the position right they're a pleasure to sit on.
  • pbt150
    pbt150 Posts: 316
    Charge Spoon?

    The basic one costs ~£20, they've got a groove that keeps things comfortable.
  • Couldn't get on with Spesh saddles meself.

    I cannot fault the Arione. Especially the Tri2 which has a bit more meat on the nose for added comfort.

    The real benefit to these saddles though, is the increased surface area, which gives you the chance to shift about comfortably and thereby transfer pressure. Don't know about others but with a bigger platform, I can put the hammer down more confidently.

    Not the lightest, but even as a weight weenie, it's the one bit of kit I won't change.

    You can bag a used Arione for £40-£50 if you look hard enough. It's not out of your price range if the future of your sprogs is (literally) resting on it...!!
  • unixnerd
    unixnerd Posts: 2,864
    Charge Spoon?

    +1. Never had a numb nuts problem on mine, but I have with other saddles. Sometimes it helps to tilt the saddle forwards a bit to raise the rear.
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  • Pokerface
    Pokerface Posts: 7,960
    After suffering a perineal abscess and huge amounts of swelling and pain in that area, I was forced to look around for a new saddle to get me back on my bike.

    I went with the Selle SMP Forma saddle. They are certainly not cheap and look very uncomfortable - but they are NOT.

    I can now ride 100 miles with no soreness at all - all my weight is supported by my sit bones instead of my undercarriage.

    The price may be high, but if it gets me out on my bike on a daly basis, then it's worth every penny.
  • +1 for Selle SMP I no longer think about saddle discomfort. I use the composite which has zero padding and yet is comfortable cos it fits right
  • nferrar
    nferrar Posts: 2,511
    Saddles are a pretty personal thing so I find some LBS that offer test ones. I tested 4 Fizik saddles a couple of months ago and whilst they were all good for an hour they got uncomfortable after that so not for me (I think probably a bit narrow), tried a Spesh Romin after that and it was great so I bought one - think around £40 for the non Ti version. Although I use Charge Spoons on my MTBs I'm not convinced they'd make great road saddles, especially if you want minimal pressure on your perineum.
  • fleshtuxedo
    fleshtuxedo Posts: 1,853
    +1 Spesh Toupe
  • -1 Toupe. Despite the fact these saddles should have worked, I found the problem even worse.

    Flite SLR Flow for me, though not cheap.

    Another one I found is OK is a WTB Silverado which is a bit wider, I use it on the MTB. Just a left field suggestion.
  • sonny73
    sonny73 Posts: 2,203
    Another +1 for Spesh Toupe, very comfy indeed.
  • On a tight budget I think the Charge Spoon is unbeatable, but then that's for me. Doesn't guarantee that it'll work for you, but at around £25 it's not too much of a gamble and many people do get on with it.
  • on-yer-bike
    on-yer-bike Posts: 2,974
    I have had similar problems.
    I have a Spesh Romin and an SMP Glider. Neither gives me numbness but I find the Romin more comfortable. I have also had a Spesh Toupe which isn't as comfy as the Romin. With both saddles tipping them down at the front is less comfy than horizontal.
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  • Pokerface
    Pokerface Posts: 7,960
    I had a look at the Charge Spoon saddle so many people are talking about. It has no cut out so how does it relieve pressure on the perineum (as the OP was asking about)?

    Or is it just a comfy saddle for most people? I ask because I have specific issues with pressure on the perineum - and am looking for a cheap second saddle for my turbo bike - without having to swap my Selle SMP over every time I use it.
  • Garry H
    Garry H Posts: 6,639
    Pokerface wrote:
    I had a look at the Charge Spoon saddle so many people are talking about. It has no cut out so how does it relieve pressure on the perineum (as the OP was asking about)?

    Or is it just a comfy saddle for most people? I ask because I have specific issues with pressure on the perineum - and am looking for a cheap second saddle for my turbo bike - without having to swap my Selle SMP over every time I use it.

    Used to have one, but sold it to someone on here almost straight away. It's relatively well made and a good bargain, but I just didn't get on with it at all, as I used to suffer from similar problems to you, although not quite as bad by the sounds of things.
  • pbt150
    pbt150 Posts: 316
    Pokerface wrote:
    I had a look at the Charge Spoon saddle so many people are talking about. It has no cut out so how does it relieve pressure on the perineum (as the OP was asking about)?

    Or is it just a comfy saddle for most people? I ask because I have specific issues with pressure on the perineum - and am looking for a cheap second saddle for my turbo bike - without having to swap my Selle SMP over every time I use it.

    They don't have a cut out, but they have a groove/depression that does the same job.

    Though I do feel a bit silly recommending a saddle, unless you happen to have exactly the same shape backside as me...
  • G-Wiz
    G-Wiz Posts: 261
    +1 for the Spesh Toupe. I was having to abandon turbo sessions after half an hour before I got one, I got lucky on the classifieds on here.

    I've also got a Selle Italia time trial saddle from years back that has a soft gel centre rather than a whole slit, that wasn't bad and it has a long gel covered nose for when you're rocked right forward on the bars. Not as good as the Toupe except when I've got aero bars on.

    Logos have all worn off so I've no idea what it is but I think it's an older model of this:
    http://www.allterraincycles.co.uk/product/108654.html

    Saddles are one thing where you just need to dig deep in your wallet unless you're lucky enough to suit a cheap brand. Good shorts are a help too.
  • Rido R2. Thirty quid. All problems solved Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful.

    http://www.rido-cyclesaddles.com/sensat ... 00064.html
  • Pokerface
    Pokerface Posts: 7,960
    Rido R2. Thirty quid. All problems solved Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful.

    http://www.rido-cyclesaddles.com/sensat ... 00064.html

    Whoever designed that saddle doesn't seem to know where the perineum is by the looks of it! :shock:
  • No contact with the perineum whatsoever. Sit bones only.
  • Pokerface
    Pokerface Posts: 7,960
    No contact with the perineum whatsoever. Sit bones only.

    If sat bolt upright! What happens when you lean forward?!
  • RDB66
    RDB66 Posts: 492
    +1 for the Spesh Romin. Best saddle i've used yet.

    I've got a Charge Knife on the winter bike, thats pretty good too.

    btw, Charge Spoon and Knife use the same mould as a Fizik Aliante.
    A Brother of the Wheel. http://www.boxfordbikeclub.co.uk

    09 Canyon Ultimate CF for the Road.
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  • Thanks for the replies, going to scour the classifieds and ebay for a second hand Romin.
  • Phate
    Phate Posts: 121
    Don't know if you can actually buy them seperatly but the Ready to Race Natural Shape 0.2 R that came with my Cube X-race is to my amazement very very comfortable!
    exercise.png
  • Pokerface wrote:
    No contact with the perineum whatsoever. Sit bones only.

    If sat bolt upright! What happens when you lean forward?!

    Actually still no contact with the perineum - this while hammering along with hands on the drops. The photo is misleading. The pads - firm but surprisingly shock absorbent - set you up quite a way above the nose whose only use is as a "guide" for the thighs. I have the nose tilted up a fair way too to avoiding sliding forward. Interestingly, I noticed afterwards on the website that they say that for time trialling the best position is to tilt the nose up.

    I had terrible problems with saddles before trying the R2. Two years on and I have never missed a ride due to saddle soreness of any kind. I consider it on a par with Campagnolo Record hubs. There really isn't anything better to put on a bike. Fit and forget. Yes, it's 200 grams more than most racing saddles but this pales into insignificance besides the extra (and hugely more comfortable) time I can put in on the bike. Result - a huge improvement in my riding ability.

    The customer feedback is worth a gander if you have the time. It runs to twenty odd pages.

    http://www.rido-cyclesaddles.com/and-mo ... 00009.html
  • Pokerface
    Pokerface Posts: 7,960
    Pokerface wrote:
    No contact with the perineum whatsoever. Sit bones only.

    If sat bolt upright! What happens when you lean forward?!

    Actually still no contact with the perineum - this while hammering along with hands on the drops. The photo is misleading. The pads - firm but surprisingly shock absorbent - set you up quite a way above the nose whose only use is as a "guide" for the thighs. I have the nose tilted up a fair way too to avoiding sliding forward. Interestingly, I noticed afterwards on the website that they say that for time trialling the best position is to tilt the nose up.

    I had terrible problems with saddles before trying the R2. Two years on and I have never missed a ride due to saddle soreness of any kind. I consider it on a par with Campagnolo Record hubs. There really isn't anything better to put on a bike. Fit and forget. Yes, it's 200 grams more than most racing saddles but this pales into insignificance besides the extra (and hugely more comfortable) time I can put in on the bike. Result - a huge improvement in my riding ability.

    The customer feedback is worth a gander if you have the time. It runs to twenty odd pages.

    http://www.rido-cyclesaddles.com/and-mo ... 00009.html


    I'm sorry - but no matter how comfy that saddle may be, I would never let it touch my bike! I just couldn't handle looking like some special needs kid cycling along on it. :oops:

    (Not that you do, but you can see my point - it looks a little to odd for me. My saddle looks odd, but at least it's still a racing saddle and does the same job. To each their own....)