replacement forks - technical assistance required!

felstead
felstead Posts: 8
edited November 2010 in Road buying advice
HI

I need to replace the carbon forks on my commute bike - a 2003 Trek 1200. Looking on the Trek Archive site it confirms that I need 1 1/8" steerer. I've been looking at various forks but some refer to hidden steerer (or is it headset?) and I'm not quite sure what this means.

Anyone able to guide me before I buy the wrong thing!

Thanks

James

Comments

  • Yes there are differences..... Some forks are only suitable for the "hidden-set" headset designs, because that has a different fork crown diameter, 45mm versus 41 for the "standard" ones. That's not the steerer tube diameter, which you correctly have as 1.1/8". It's the diameter of the flat bit where the crown race sits at the base of the steerer tube. In many cases you can still use these larger ones anyway with a "normal" headset, just may look weird with such a mismatch between the headset bearing and the fork crown sizes. Not really recommended though.

    Shouldn't be hard to find a suitable replacement though. There's plenty of forks available which will suit. Ritchey, Reynolds, Deda, Easton, 3T are some of the better ones, but there's loads from other makes as well.

    If you are replacing the forks, you will need to either get the crown race removed from the currrent fork and re-installed on your new one, or get a new crown race as a spare part if you can find one to match, or get a new headset. You will also need a new star-fangled nut inserted in the steerer tube, if it is alloy (once cut), or a compression plug if you get a carbon steerer tube jobbie, for the top cap of headset.
    Open One+ BMC TE29 Seven 622SL On One Scandal Cervelo RS
  • Stellite
    Stellite Posts: 544
    I got these to fit to a bike with an external headset. They seem good quality for the price.

    http://www.planet-x-bikes.co.uk/i/q/FOG ... -road-fork
  • thanks - sounds more complex than I was thinking! The home repair option is disappearing in the rear view mirror