Clip float for my duck feet

Old Pedaller
Old Pedaller Posts: 104
edited October 2010 in Road buying advice
I have ridden with toeclips for over twenty years but now intend to go clipless on the new bike. I read that Shimano have 4 degrees of float and Crank Bros 6 degrees.

I have measured my feet on the squared vinyl in the kitchen and seem to have a 12 degree splay (each side) but don't think I look that abnormal when walking. My heels do occasionally touch the centre of the cranks but I don't feel that I cycle at "12 degrees" - maybe I do.

Am I fated to stay with toeclips or does anyone have experience to say that I will be able to use what's available without knee problems?

Thanks

Comments

  • HamishD
    HamishD Posts: 538
    Speedplay Zero . . .

    Next! :)
  • dmch2
    dmch2 Posts: 731
    You can change the angle of the cleats in the shoe as well.
    2010 Trek 1.5 Road - swissstop green, conti GP4000S
    2004 Marin Muirwoods Hybrid
  • Ginjafro
    Ginjafro Posts: 572
    I too have similar feet but I don't think I quite walk like Charlie Chaplin, more like Liam Gallagher. I have adjusted my SPD cleats as far as possible to accomodate "duck feet" and they feel great and as far as I am aware don't look daft!
    Giant XTC Pro-Carbon
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  • sub55
    sub55 Posts: 1,025
    I have ridden with toeclips for over twenty years but now intend to go clipless on the new bike. I read that Shimano have 4 degrees of float and Crank Bros 6 degrees.

    I have measured my feet on the squared vinyl in the kitchen and seem to have a 12 degree splay (each side) but don't think I look that abnormal when walking. My heels do occasionally touch the centre of the cranks but I don't feel that I cycle at "12 degrees" - maybe I do.

    Am I fated to stay with toeclips or does anyone have experience to say that I will be able to use what's available without knee problems?

    Thanks

    i think you`ve completely misunderstood what the float actually means.
    Its the amount of degrees , you have to twist your ankle to disengage from the peddle.
    But you mount the cleats in the first place , so your foot sits where you want it to.
    constantly reavalueating the situation and altering the perceived parameters accordingly
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,545
    yep, speedplay zero, you can adjust the float over a huge range, and it's 'free', no spring trying to force your foot to one position

    there's lateral adjustment on the cleats, but if you find your heels are hitting the cranks/chainstays, you can get longer axles, 1/8", 1/4" and 1/2" longer than standard, but it gets expensive as i don't think you can buy pedals ready-built with longer axles, you have to buy the pedals, they buy the long axles separately
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • Garry H
    Garry H Posts: 6,639
    sub55 wrote:
    i think you`ve completely misunderstood what the float actually means.
    Its the amount of degrees , you have to twist your ankle to disengage from the peddle.
    But you mount the cleats in the first place , so your foot sits where you want it to.

    +1 A very common misconception going by what I read on here.
  • crankycrank
    crankycrank Posts: 1,830
    As mentioned just mount your cleats at an angle to accomodate your feet. Along with the already mentioned longer axles, you can also get axle spacers in different thicknesses that put the pedal platform further from the crank so that your feet have more clearance when pedaling. The float option came about when it was found that the original Look clipless pedals just clamped the foot in with no side to side heel movement or "float" available through the pedal stroke. It was found that many riders developed knee problems because of this, Bernard Hinault being one of them. Toe clips always have allowed a small amount of natural float so this was kind of a new phenomena with the clipless pedals. I just mention this because once you get your foot position sorted you can determine how much float you prefer in a pedal system. 0 deg. rotation to 20+deg. are available from different brands. Your knees well let you know how much you need. And don't get discouraged if you have trouble adjusting to getting clipped and unclipped. Almost everyone goes through a learning period and a topple over or two at stops when first switching to clipless. After my first 20 yrs of riding with toeclips, I find clipless are far easier to use once you've had some practise.