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Can I get through winter on 23c slick tyres?

Canny JockCanny Jock Posts: 1,051
edited October 2010 in Commuting chat
What do you think? Can't fit any wider under full guards. Last winter I had 28c Marathon Plus which were fine, current tyres seem ok except on manhole covers, but I guess this is true of any tyres?
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  • I ride 23s year round. It's fine, except in snow and slush. And ice, but no surprise there.
    Swim. Bike. Run. Yeah. That's what I used to do.

    Bike 1
    Bike 2-A
  • Can't see why not. The only caveat is rain and wind seem to put much more grit to the side of the road and 23mm do seem to feel every stone. I much prefer 25mm in winter. OK, let's compromise try 24mm :wink:
    CAAD9
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  • jongingejonginge Posts: 5,945
    Greg66 wrote:
    I ride 23s year round. It's fine, except in snow and slush. And ice, but no surprise there.
    same here. Should be ok within the heat island of London.

    @buckled_rims :lol:
    FCN 2-4 "Shut up legs", Jens Voigt
    Planet-x Scott
    Rides
  • Canny JockCanny Jock Posts: 1,051
    Cool, thanks guys. I'll carry on, then blame you lot if it goes wrong :D
  • Wrath RobWrath Rob Posts: 2,918
    jonginge wrote:
    Greg66 wrote:
    I ride 23s year round. It's fine, except in snow and slush. And ice, but no surprise there.
    same here. Should be ok within the heat island of London.

    @buckled_rims :lol:

    +1 on both counts
    FCN3: Titanium Qoroz.
  • Can't see why not. The only caveat is rain and wind seem to put much more grit to the side of the road and 23mm do seem to feel every stone. I much prefer 25mm in winter. OK, let's compromise try 24mm :wink:
    I lost count of the amount of times my 24mm Open Pavés punctured last winter. OTO, my 25mm Bontrager somethings (Hard Case?) have punctured like once or twice.

    The solution is clear. :lol:
  • I'm umming and ahhing about whether to get some CX tyres for the country lanes around here... the road tyres had a few problems last year and that was before I moved and stopped for the rest of the Winter.
    Chunky Cyclists need your love too! :-)
    2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5
    2012 Felt F65X
    Proud CX Pervert and quiet roadie. 12 mile commuter
  • gtvlussogtvlusso Posts: 5,112
    Yes - do it every year! Except in ice and snow.....then I either take the MTB or the car. When it is really bad I work from home.
  • cjcpcjcp Posts: 13,345
    I'm umming and ahhing about whether to get some CX tyres for the country lanes around here... the road tyres had a few problems last year and that was before I moved and stopped for the rest of the Winter.

    I used CX tyres (Michelin Mud 2s, 30mm) in the snow last winter for the ride through the Park (it was closed to traffic) and for the slush. Had an absolute blast in the Park - great SCR action with mtbers - and they were much better in the slush than my 23mm slicks (perhaps obviously). I ran them at about 40psi. Just be careful when cornering on tarmac - they're not so good, as I found out when I was sliding along the road.

    Otherwise, what G66 said.
    FCN 2-4.

    "What happens when the hammer goes down, kids?"
    "It stays down, Daddy."
    "Exactly."
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,761
    If it helps i've switched to 23c / 25c conti hardshells for all year round commuting and the roads/tracks around here are frankly shocking, no visits (on this bike) from you know who yet this year :shock:

    Especially as I had over 50 last year.

    No had any grip problems in morning frost or all kinds of wet & windy, I certainly notice the difference a 25c make on the back, the ride is much more comfortable.

    Oh and keep them pumped up hard.

    Edit: for the snow and ice I have studded conti spikes or something I forget now (repressed memory) did the job but still had one visit thankfully it stayed inflated until I got home.
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
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  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 18,916
    Sheesh! I knew you had a reputation for such things, but that must be £200 worth of tubes. I might give the Hardshells a try as although my Gatorskins are pretty resistant to pointy things, they don't really inspire confidence when cornering in the wet.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,761
    rjsterry wrote:
    Sheesh! I knew you had a reputation for such things, but that must be £200 worth of tubes. I might give the Hardshells a try as although my Gatorskins are pretty resistant to pointy things, they don't really inspire confidence when cornering in the wet.

    Actually it was 54 not including errors changing tubes and patches that came off, but hey who's counting :roll:

    Hardshells +100
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • Canny JockCanny Jock Posts: 1,051
    So I'm really trying to work out whether I need to have my hybrid on standby with chunky, grippy tyres or not.

    My normal commuting bike is a single speed Ribble winter frame which won't take more than 23c tyres under full guards, maybe a Singlecross would be the answer, possibly as n+1? But I am also thinking about a winter geared bike, that would make 5 in total and the shed is getting full - or I could convert the Ribble back to geared as the winter trainer - decisions, decisions!

    And rest.
  • I rode all last year on 23c, even in slush and snow. I didn't have too many problems at all. That said, I'm planning on using my new Genesis CX bike if it snows this year.
  • Canny Jock wrote:
    So I'm really trying to work out whether I need to have my hybrid on standby with chunky, grippy tyres or not.

    My normal commuting bike is a single speed Ribble winter frame which won't take more than 23c tyres under full guards, maybe a Singlecross would be the answer, possibly as n+1? But I am also thinking about a winter geared bike, that would make 5 in total and the shed is getting full - or I could convert the Ribble back to geared as the winter trainer - decisions, decisions!

    And rest.

    Welcome to the world of CX. Please join the queue for a suitable all round commuting bike that is the answer to all your needs.

    Free cape and access to the exclusive club is free for all new enlightened commuters 8)
    Chunky Cyclists need your love too! :-)
    2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5
    2012 Felt F65X
    Proud CX Pervert and quiet roadie. 12 mile commuter
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,761
    Canny Jock wrote:
    So I'm really trying to work out whether I need to have my hybrid on standby with chunky, grippy tyres or not.

    My normal commuting bike is a single speed Ribble winter frame which won't take more than 23c tyres under full guards, maybe a Singlecross would be the answer, possibly as n+1? But I am also thinking about a winter geared bike, that would make 5 in total and the shed is getting full - or I could convert the Ribble back to geared as the winter trainer - decisions, decisions!

    And rest.

    My commuter is a ribble winter with 25/23c and crud race blades no clearance issues.
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 16,014
    rjsterry wrote:
    Sheesh! I knew you had a reputation for such things, but that must be £200 worth of tubes.

    Depends whether or not you can read the instructions on a puncture repair kit!
    Faster than a tent.......
  • According to Sheldon Brown, seen as a bit of an authority on cycling, tread on bike tyres makes absolutely no difference whatsoever to stability (I think unless it's knoobly style for off road use).

    All tread and grip on cycling tyres is purely cosmetic because it's what people expect to see but is completely ineffective. Tread on car and motorbike tyres is NOT to help them grip the road but to avoid aquaplaning. Aquaplaning occurs when the vehicle is travelling so fast that water/moisture on the road surface builds up under and in front of the tyre and cannot clear fast enough ultimately resulting in the vehicle sliding on a bed of moisture. Tread allows the water to escape more quickly to avoid this. This is more likely in cars and motorbikes because they travel at higher speeds and have wider tyres.

    For there to be a risk of aquaplaning with 23c bike tyres you would need to be travelling at several hundred miles per hour (can't remember the exact figure, it's on Sheldon's site). So slicks or treaded tyres makes no difference whatsoever.

    Just avoid manhole covers in the wet or dry!
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • My normal commuter is fixed wheel Langster with 23 mm tyres and full SKS mudguards. tight fit and any road debris (leaves, mud, slush) rubs a bit.
    Tyres were fine over winter (although PF came yesterday morning, for the first time in 9?) months)

    I now have a Tricross that I'm planning on using if / when there's snow. More for the clearance than for the tyre choice. I run 23mm tyres on it too, and have 32 CX tyres if the weather gets like it was last winter.

    Ideally I'd go for a Singlecross. This would combine the clearance of the Tricross with the simplicity of the Langster. Also better brakes! Shame they are no longer selling Singlecross :(

    The ultimate commuter for me would be a disc-braked fixed wheel. Might have to wait a year or two before 700c discs really become mainstream following UCI CX permission.
    Commute: Langster -Singlecross - Brompton S2-LX

    Road: 95 Trek 5500 -Look 695 Aerolight eTap - Boardman TTe eTap

    Offroad: Pace RC200 - Dawes Kickback 2 tandem - Tricross - Boardman CXR9.8 - Ridley x-fire
  • Clever PunClever Pun Posts: 6,778
    I rode Vittoria rubino tyres fine through the winter and even the snow albeit carfeully
    Purveyor of sonic doom

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  • The ultimate commuter for me would be a disc-braked fixed wheel

    Cotic road rat... I will own one hopefully sooner rather than later.
    Le Cannon [98 Cannondale M400] [FCN: 8]
    The Mad Monkey [2013 Hoy 003] [FCN: 4]
  • According to Sheldon Brown, seen as a bit of an authority on cycling, tread on bike tyres makes absolutely no difference whatsoever to stability (I think unless it's knoobly style for off road use).

    All tread and grip on cycling tyres is purely cosmetic because it's what people expect to see but is completely ineffective. Tread on car and motorbike tyres is NOT to help them grip the road but to avoid aquaplaning. Aquaplaning occurs when the vehicle is travelling so fast that water/moisture on the road surface builds up under and in front of the tyre and cannot clear fast enough ultimately resulting in the vehicle sliding on a bed of moisture. Tread allows the water to escape more quickly to avoid this. This is more likely in cars and motorbikes because they travel at higher speeds and have wider tyres.

    For there to be a risk of aquaplaning with 23c bike tyres you would need to be travelling at several hundred miles per hour (can't remember the exact figure, it's on Sheldon's site). So slicks or treaded tyres makes no difference whatsoever.

    Just avoid manhole covers in the wet or dry!

    Contact patch size does make a difference, though. Bigger tyres are an advantage. Knobbles are also advantageous in snow, in my opinion.
  • According to Sheldon Brown, seen as a bit of an authority on cycling, tread on bike tyres makes absolutely no difference whatsoever to stability (I think unless it's knoobly style for off road use).

    All tread and grip on cycling tyres is purely cosmetic because it's what people expect to see but is completely ineffective. Tread on car and motorbike tyres is NOT to help them grip the road but to avoid aquaplaning. Aquaplaning occurs when the vehicle is travelling so fast that water/moisture on the road surface builds up under and in front of the tyre and cannot clear fast enough ultimately resulting in the vehicle sliding on a bed of moisture. Tread allows the water to escape more quickly to avoid this. This is more likely in cars and motorbikes because they travel at higher speeds and have wider tyres.

    For there to be a risk of aquaplaning with 23c bike tyres you would need to be travelling at several hundred miles per hour (can't remember the exact figure, it's on Sheldon's site). So slicks or treaded tyres makes no difference whatsoever.

    Just avoid manhole covers in the wet or dry!

    Contact patch size does make a difference, though. Bigger tyres are an advantage. Knobbles are also advantageous in snow, in my opinion.

    Between these two posts everything is covered. Slick tyres grip better on tarmac, bigger tyres offer more grip and a smoother ride(for the same compound and tread pattern/slickness)

    studded ice spikes are the only thing that grip on ice, but mud spikes work pretty well on compacted snow but are really treacherous on ice.
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,761
    Hybrid with spikes

    e55e2f768ca24ee297e6e19d6f0e0f33.jpg

    Attica in the background trying to work out where he is, nothing new there then ;-)
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,761
    On a commuting run last year

    a5bc91519c7c4350899fc6fd141f98c6.jpg
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • According to Sheldon Brown, seen as a bit of an authority on cycling, tread on bike tyres makes absolutely no difference whatsoever to stability (I think unless it's knoobly style for off road use).

    All tread and grip on cycling tyres is purely cosmetic because it's what people expect to see but is completely ineffective. Tread on car and motorbike tyres is NOT to help them grip the road but to avoid aquaplaning. Aquaplaning occurs when the vehicle is travelling so fast that water/moisture on the road surface builds up under and in front of the tyre and cannot clear fast enough ultimately resulting in the vehicle sliding on a bed of moisture. Tread allows the water to escape more quickly to avoid this. This is more likely in cars and motorbikes because they travel at higher speeds and have wider tyres.

    For there to be a risk of aquaplaning with 23c bike tyres you would need to be travelling at several hundred miles per hour (can't remember the exact figure, it's on Sheldon's site). So slicks or treaded tyres makes no difference whatsoever.

    Just avoid manhole covers in the wet or dry!

    Contact patch size does make a difference, though. Bigger tyres are an advantage. Knobbles are also advantageous in snow, in my opinion.

    Yes I agree, contact area/tyre size and type of rubber or TPI makes more difference than any type of tread. I've noticed that on my new(ish) Ribble with Vittoria Rubinos I am able to wheelspin, especially when honking it up hills in the wet. Never happened on Gatorskins. Knobblies make a difference off road, certainly
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • I've noticed that on my new(ish) Ribble with Vittoria Rubinos I am able to wheelspin, especially when honking it up hills in the wet. Never happened on Gatorskins. Knobblies make a difference off road, certainly

    I can wheelspin Rubino Pros, but not too much. Never try Bontrager Race lite Hardcase , I could spin them in the dry :roll:
  • asprillaasprilla Posts: 8,440
    itboffin wrote:
    On a commuting run last year

    a5bc91519c7c4350899fc6fd141f98c6.jpg

    Are those spikes?

    I'm thinking about investing in a pair of Schwalbe Marathon Winters for the new bike when it arrives but I'm a bit concerned that they start at 35mm and the clearance on the guards is for 35mm tyres. Do the spikes on winter tyres generally stick out very much or am I going to have to try them to see if it works?
    Mud - Genesis Vapour CCX
    Race - Fuji Norcom Straight
    Sun - Cervelo R3
    Winter / Commute - Dolan ADX
  • cjcpcjcp Posts: 13,345
    I almost forgot...

    At VB lights this morning, there was a chap dressed all in black, with ski goggles, astride a, er, bike. This bike had tracks over the rear wheel, with a ski on the right side of the front wheel. He was being photographed by his mate, who was standing in the traffic island.

    A genuine WTF? moment.

    Did anyone else see this?
    FCN 2-4.

    "What happens when the hammer goes down, kids?"
    "It stays down, Daddy."
    "Exactly."
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