Chain catcher for triple ?

Quadbypass
Quadbypass Posts: 20
edited September 2010 in Workshop
I would like to fit a chain catcher ( triple ) to protect my frame. The only one I can find is K-edge, but $60 inc postage seems a little steep ( although I'll get it if I have to ). Does anyone know of any other options ?.
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Comments

  • Once setup you really shouldn't need one, just make sure end stop is set to right position. I'd recommend putting it to the right side as much as possible (just enough so it changes to smallest and does not rub) That should be enough for it not to plop onto the BB tube.
    Say... That's a nice bike..
    Trax T700 with Lew Racing Pro VT-1 ;-)
  • Smokin Joe
    Smokin Joe Posts: 2,706
    Once setup you really shouldn't need one, just make sure end stop is set to right position. I'd recommend putting it to the right side as much as possible (just enough so it changes to smallest and does not rub) That should be enough for it not to plop onto the BB tube.
    In theory.

    Even with the mech perfectly adjusted you can still bounce the chain over the inner ring should you hit a bump mid shift, for example. That's why pro teams fit them.
  • Thanks for the info Joe, I had looked at this but couldn't work out how it worked. Will it work on a triple.
  • Maybe for MTB'ers. Did have some problems with mine jumping, but probably just 1-2mm too much to the left, never had problems and done several hundred miles since. Also when changing should reduce the amount of power anyway, so if it plops off it'll just plop onto the BB with no or very little damage (cleaned up my BB tube and no scratches to the paint, considering it fell off about 5 times when it was new and setting up period)
    Say... That's a nice bike..
    Trax T700 with Lew Racing Pro VT-1 ;-)
  • schweiz
    schweiz Posts: 1,644
    I use these....

    http://www.gvtc.com/~ngear/index.html

    never used one with a triple but can't see why it wouldn't work.

    Send Nick an e-mail with what you want, he'll send it. You fit it and if you're happy you make the payment through paypal, if not, send it back.
  • +1 for the n-gear jump stop. You can get them in the UK at www.jdcycles.co.uk/components/chains/n- ... hain-guide
  • From www.gytc.com
    "Do I need a Jump Stop?
    Maybe not. Take a look at how close your front derailleur comes to your smallest chainring. On a road bike with double chainrings, the derailleur might be close enough to serve as a fairly acceptable guide. On most bikes with triple chainrings however, the front derailleur has to stand off at some distance from the smallest chainring and employ the toss-and-hope strategy."

    Save any embaressment next time Contador tries to make the most of your next chain mishap
  • Smokin Joe wrote:
    Once setup you really shouldn't need one, just make sure end stop is set to right position. I'd recommend putting it to the right side as much as possible (just enough so it changes to smallest and does not rub) That should be enough for it not to plop onto the BB tube.
    In theory.

    Even with the mech perfectly adjusted you can still bounce the chain over the inner ring should you hit a bump mid shift, for example. That's why pro teams fit them.

    That's true, but pro teams fit them because dropping your chanin could result in you losing the Tour.

    I have only shipped my chain once in the 4 years I have had my 'new' bike, and it held me up for about five seconds as I am obviously a better mechanic than Andy Schleck!

    A chain catcher would be overkill for me. I don't race though.
  • Smokin Joe
    Smokin Joe Posts: 2,706
    Smokin Joe wrote:
    Once setup you really shouldn't need one, just make sure end stop is set to right position. I'd recommend putting it to the right side as much as possible (just enough so it changes to smallest and does not rub) That should be enough for it not to plop onto the BB tube.
    In theory.

    Even with the mech perfectly adjusted you can still bounce the chain over the inner ring should you hit a bump mid shift, for example. That's why pro teams fit them.

    That's true, but pro teams fit them because dropping your chanin could result in you losing the Tour.

    I have only shipped my chain once in the 4 years I have had my 'new' bike, and it held me up for about five seconds as I am obviously a better mechanic than Andy Schleck!

    A chain catcher would be overkill for me. I don't race though.
    You only need to drop your chain once, but if it takes a chunk out of the frame and ruins it you would regret not spending 5 or 6 quid on a catcher.
  • topdude
    topdude Posts: 1,557
    +1 for the Dog Fang, fit it / forget it :D
    He is not the messiah, he is a very naughty boy !!
  • I suppose on a carbon frame it's worth it. But on my old MTB never bothered setting up front derailler, must have derailled at least once a week, and after dozens of times the chain hitting the BB tube, all it did was scratch the paint a little. Had far more damage elseware, ie along frame where it rests against something, brush up against something, stones hitting it etc.
    Say... That's a nice bike..
    Trax T700 with Lew Racing Pro VT-1 ;-)
  • Smokin Joe wrote:
    You only need to drop your chain once, but if it takes a chunk out of the frame and ruins it you would regret not spending 5 or 6 quid on a catcher.

    My frame is made from steel, not cheese.
  • lol. yeah my frame is steel too had a couple of derails on that, thought it scratched the paint but it was just the oil from the chain.
    Say... That's a nice bike..
    Trax T700 with Lew Racing Pro VT-1 ;-)
  • I've had 2 alloy frames chewed over the years with chainsuck. They are pretty nasty cutters when biking into chainstays.
    Commute: Langster -Singlecross - Brompton S2-LX

    Road: 95 Trek 5500 -Look 695 Aerolight eTap - Boardman TTe eTap

    Offroad: Pace RC200 - Dawes Kickback 2 tandem - Tricross - Boardman CXR9.8 - Ridley x-fire
  • That's rear though? yeah can imagine if it gets stuck on chainstay near the wheel QR would be pretty nasty. Even worse on the spoke side of the wheel though :shock:
    Say... That's a nice bike..
    Trax T700 with Lew Racing Pro VT-1 ;-)
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    My alu framed triple came from Epic Cycles, and after a week or so I noticed they'd fitted a dog fang (and not charged me anything extra!)

    So they clearly think they are a good idea, and they do work with triples.
  • Smokin Joe
    Smokin Joe Posts: 2,706
    Smokin Joe wrote:
    You only need to drop your chain once, but if it takes a chunk out of the frame and ruins it you would regret not spending 5 or 6 quid on a catcher.

    My frame is made from steel, not cheese.
    The paint to touch the bb up costs more than a Dog Fang, unless you want to find out how easily steel turns to cheese if you let it rust.
  • The dog fang and solutions like it won't work on most carbon frames - below the derailleur the "seat post" is too large and oddly shaped.

    The K-Edge is pricey, but works brilliantly, and is worth every penny. Make sure you get the triple version - the double and triple are different.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    "The dog fang and solutions like it won't work on most carbon frames - below the derailleur the "seat post" is too large and oddly shaped".

    There's a gap in the market for a Dog fang with a flexible mounting band for these precious carbon frames with oversized / bulbous seat tubes. Preferably with a small patch of functionally pointless carbon fibre in order to justify the ridiculous price such a thing would command.

    I thought of it first, so 40% of any profits to me please.
  • Smokin Joe wrote:
    Smokin Joe wrote:
    You only need to drop your chain once, but if it takes a chunk out of the frame and ruins it you would regret not spending 5 or 6 quid on a catcher.

    My frame is made from steel, not cheese.
    The paint to touch the bb up costs more than a Dog Fang, unless you want to find out how easily steel turns to cheese if you let it rust.

    :)

    I've been riding steel frames (and some aluminium ones) for almost 30 years. I've recently handed on a 531c frame that I bought in 1987, and whilst it needed a respray it was still structurally fine.

    My experience is that:

    a) The chain rarely falls off a correctly set up bike

    b) Even if it does then any damage is negligible - at least on metal frames..

    The original poster is free to ignore this if he likes.
  • Smokin Joe wrote:
    Smokin Joe wrote:
    You only need to drop your chain once, but if it takes a chunk out of the frame and ruins it you would regret not spending 5 or 6 quid on a catcher.

    My frame is made from steel, not cheese.
    The paint to touch the bb up costs more than a Dog Fang, unless you want to find out how easily steel turns to cheese if you let it rust.

    Car touch up paint, £2. I keep a eye on my steel bike for chips, then apply some touch up paint. So I need touch up paint anyway.
    Say... That's a nice bike..
    Trax T700 with Lew Racing Pro VT-1 ;-)
  • maddog 2
    maddog 2 Posts: 8,114
    there are now alternatives to the K-Edge

    I run one of these on my carbon frame, which is basically the same thing, and light

    A0951.jpg

    1267198419351-14dyv8uix0ebx-670-75.jpg

    http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=A0951

    I run a dog fang on the commuter.

    Each to his own, but dropped chains do happen and you can take your chances as to whether it will damage anything. Personally, I just find dropped chains annoying, which is enough to fit the solution.
    Facts are meaningless, you can use facts to prove anything that's remotely true! - Homer
  • ColinJ
    ColinJ Posts: 2,218
    I have Dog Fangs on all 3 of my bikes, including my Basso which has a triple. I think they are great!
  • Scrumple
    Scrumple Posts: 2,665
    I'm going to get one for the wilier... there is a chunk of white enamel missing on my BB area when mine slipped at the base of an ascent, and I was dropped by the time I forced out the jammed chain and saw the damage.

    If you never need them in 5 years - great. If you do once, they make the difference.

    As for my Ti bike, that can take the hit! No need for one.
  • You can get the K Tec catcher for 25 quid on Wiggle, saves going the states....
    Helmand Province is such a nice place.....
  • maddog 2
    maddog 2 Posts: 8,114
    the rotor one is cheaper :wink:
    Facts are meaningless, you can use facts to prove anything that's remotely true! - Homer
  • satanas
    satanas Posts: 1,303
    If the dog fang fits your frame it works brilliantly and weighs very little. In practice you don't notice it's there - except that the chain *never* comes off again. FWIW, Bianchi and Lemond have both supplied these as standard equipment on many frames/bikes; no doubt others have too.

    On some drivetrains (particularly those with triple cranks, STI levers and short chainstays) it can be very difficult to get the front mech to shift reliably without dropping the chain. The dog fang totally fixes this problem. If you have minimal clearance between the crank/chainring and stay, it can also be *very* difficult to remove a jammed chain, and that's without worrying about damaging the stay.

    IMO, whichever one of these devices fits your bike is a wise investment.
  • rake
    rake Posts: 3,204
    what if he has a band on mech and the dog fang donnesnt fit.
  • satanas
    satanas Posts: 1,303
    ^ The dog fang fits on the frame somewhat lower than the mech; it will work fine with band-mounted mechs. The only reason it is likely not to fit is if the frame is too large a diameter or a weird shape where the dog fang needs to attach. If the frame is cylindrical (28.6/31.8/34.9mm) to about the same height as the inner ring's diameter (or a bit lower) then it will most likely fit.