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Is it ok to fly with CO2 cannisters?

richaricha Posts: 1,633
edited June 2010 in Workshop
Do you fly with CO2?

Off to Marmotte tomorrow and wondering whether to pack CO2?
Rich

Posts

  • mrushtonmrushton Posts: 5,182
    No. They'll make you remove them from whatever bag they are in. Take a pump or buy canisters in France.
    M.Rushton
  • Ben6899Ben6899 Posts: 8,965
    Or pack them in your check-in luggage. The hold isn't pressurised.
    Ben

    Bikes: Donhou DSS4 Custom | Condor Italia RC | Gios Megalite | Dolan Preffisio | Giant Bowery '76
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  • mrushtonmrushton Posts: 5,182
    # Gas cylinders. Deeply refrigerated flammable, non-flammable, and poisonous gases such as butane, oxygen, propane, and aqualung cylinders. Includes butane gas (eg for use with heated hair appliances) camping gas, and chef's blow torches.

    The above is quoted from E-jet regs - I suspect the rules will be interpreted to suit.
    M.Rushton
  • alfabluealfablue Posts: 8,497
    It is not clear cut. I flew on BA with life jackets containing CO2 cylinders. Their website said I could if I called to tell them first. I called and they were disinterested, so I just got the name of the person and kept a record and packed them in my case. Different airlines have different approaches.

    Easyjet say no

    http://www.easyjet.com/EN/Book/regulations.html#baggage

    Ryanair allow lifejackets with 2 CO2 cyclinders

    http://www.ryanair.com/en/questions/can ... lifejacket

    and their prohibit items only excludes flammable gasses http://www.ryanair.com/en/questions/wha ... in-baggage

    (funniest FAQ - can I bring a parachute? :lol: ).

    BMI say no

    http://www.flybmi.com/bmi/en-gb/flight- ... ation.aspx

    BA Yes - small non-flam gas cylinders, restricted (in qualntity) - no notification required

    http://www.britishairways.com/travel/ba ... blic/en_gb

    Check with your airline, it may be fine in hold baggage
  • richaricha Posts: 1,633
    It's BA, so should be ok.
    Restricted items needing no notification

    The following list covers all items that may be carried on British Airways flights but are still restricted to specific limits on quantities or dimensions:

    Non-flammable, non-toxic gas cylinders - e.g. for operation of mechanical limbs
    Rich
  • alfabluealfablue Posts: 8,497
    Ben6899 wrote:
    Or pack them in your check-in luggage. The hold isn't pressurised.
    The hold will be pressurised, but this makes no difference either way. Some airlines also want you to deflate your bike tyres for completely illogical reasons - I refused last time and they blinked first :D
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    The main reason is that they don't like the noise of leaking gas in the hold - can't tell if its something wrong with the plane or something in someone's luggage.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • alfabluealfablue Posts: 8,497
    Never heard that one before
  • pilot_petepilot_pete Posts: 2,100
    edited June 2010
    Monty Dog wrote:
    The main reason is that they don't like the noise of leaking gas in the hold - can't tell if its something wrong with the plane or something in someone's luggage.

    Take it from me mate, we wouldn't hear a bike innertube deflating if it was in the hold, nor a CO2 cannister of the size us roadies use............ :wink: , not unless it went with a bang!

    PP

    p.s. http://www.icao.int/anb/fls/dangerousgoods/TechnicalInstructions/ ICAO (International Civil Aviation Authority) is the regulatory authority overseing carriage of dangerous goods on passenger and cargo aircraft. You can purchase their Technical Instructions from the link, if you have deep pockets! Alternatively contact your airline and speak to their cargo department who will answer questions for you. If you just phone and get a 'help desk' operator they will probably give duff info. Carriage of dangerous goods is quite complex (understandably) and many inocuous household items are considered dangerous, because in a pressurised tube at 37,000ft they can cause problems, especially if they are not suitably packed or are able to come into contact with something else.........
  • surely you'll do some damge to your tyres if you don't deflate them? as the external pressure drops with altitude the gauge pressure of the tyre increases (internal pressure - air overpressure). if you want to test this idea take an sealed empty bottle in the cabin with you, once you get to a cruising altitude open it and listen to the pressurised air inside escape, the hold isn't pressurised so the effect is greater... (IMHO)
    All hail the FSM and his noodly appendage!
  • ride_wheneverride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    hardly, it isn't a significant change and most people don't pump their tyres up to 160 psi.

    for your reference tyre exploding with a decent tyre the rim fails first.
  • alfabluealfablue Posts: 8,497
    The hold is pressurised.

    It will probably be at about 0.8 bar, your average tyre may be at 6 bar at sea level (1 bar) at 0.8 bar the effective pressure in the tube would be 7.5 bar, well within the range that it will cope with.
  • pilot_petepilot_pete Posts: 2,100
    the hold isn't pressurised
    depends what aircraft you fly in, but modern passenger jets are. We carry dogs, cats etc etc and they don't react well to unpressurised holds!

    Your theory is indeed correct though, but remember that there is a pressure differential; the cabin altitude (i.e. the pressure inside the pressurised parts of the aircraft) only rises to about 8000ft - which is the same as standing on top of an 8000' mountain. I am sure the Grand Tours climb up to altitudes such as this and I haven't seen any of they tyres exploding!

    PP
  • alfabluealfablue Posts: 8,497
    Yes, I have noticed the differential when looking at the barometer on my watch. I think .76 to .8 bar is the norm in your average airliner at altitude.
  • andrew_sandrew_s Posts: 2,511
    surely you'll do some damge to your tyres if you don't deflate them? as the external pressure drops with altitude the gauge pressure of the tyre increases (internal pressure - air overpressure). if you want to test this idea take an sealed empty bottle in the cabin with you, once you get to a cruising altitude open it and listen to the pressurised air inside escape, the hold isn't pressurised so the effect is greater... (IMHO)
    The hold is pressurised.

    If the hold is pressurised the cabin floor has to be strong enough to support the weight of the passengers and seating. If it's not pressurised the cabin floor has to support the weight of passengers and seating plus the pressure exerted by the air in the cabin.
    If the aircraft is flying at 9000m (air pressure ~30kPa), and the cabin is pressurised to 2700m (air pressure ~75kPa) you've got a pressure difference of 45kPa = 4.5 tonnes per square metre. Making the cabin floor strong enough to support that would have a significant impact on the ability to carry passengers economically.

    When I've taken an altimeter on board the cabin altitude has been about 2700m. Would you worry about your tyres bursting through the pressure difference if you rode up an alpine pass?
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