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Armstrong is no hero in Texas.

BikingBernieBikingBernie Posts: 2,163
edited June 2010 in Pro race
Surprised no one else has mentioned this, so here goes...

HOUSTON, TX--(Marketwire - June 17, 2010) - Tops In Texas announced today voting has begun statewide on the Top Texas Sports Hero of All Time Contest. The contest voting lasts until the end of the year. Noticeably absent from the ten nominees are people such as Roger Clemens, Lance Armstrong and Carl Lewis. "They certainly meet the 'sports' litmus test to deserve to be a nominee on this list," said Tim Dillard, site host for Tops In Texas. "As we researched our top ten nominees, we felt that the three men notably left off the list have pressing questions regarding their potential to be immortalized as Top Texas Sports Hero of All Time."

http://www.marketwire.com/press-release ... 278132.htm

All three of those omitted have been linked with doping...
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  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,584
    Trust me on this one BB. Your title "Armstrong is no ........." is completely wrong.
    While he might not be a hero to some idiots or politicians trying to make up some new award to give out, I can guarantee that not to many Texans would take kindly to your comment. Great way to get your *ss beat just about anywhere down in the Lone Star State. And they will do it too. And love doing it. :wink::wink:
  • dave_1dave_1 Posts: 9,512
    BB, not doing the gutter level jump to conclusions you turned the Kirchen thread into.
    Dennis, BB's handle won't survive the TDF if LA rides well
  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,584
    Dave_1 wrote:
    BB, not doing the gutter level jump to conclusions you turned the Kirchen thread into.
    Dennis, BB's handle won't survive the TDF if LA rides well

    Hope we don't have to put him on a suicide watch if LA is doing well near the end of this years TDF.
  • ratsbeyfusratsbeyfus Posts: 2,841
    Muppets! :D

    StatlerWaldorf.JPG


    I had one of them red bikes but I don't any more. Sad face.

    @ratsbey
  • ratsbeyfusratsbeyfus Posts: 2,841
    Youse gonna squeal like a piggy BB if you'se ever set foot down Texas way!

    deliverance.gif


    I had one of them red bikes but I don't any more. Sad face.

    @ratsbey
  • AidanRAidanR Posts: 1,142
    dennisn wrote:
    Trust me on this one BB. Your title "Armstrong is no ........." is completely wrong.
    While he might not be a hero to some idiots or politicians trying to make up some new award to give out, I can guarantee that not to many Texans would take kindly to your comment. Great way to get your *ss beat just about anywhere down in the Lone Star State. And they will do it too. And love doing it. :wink::wink:

    I thought that kind of behaviour was strongly frowned on in the Bible Belt? :wink:
    Bike lover and part-time cyclist.
  • moray_gubmoray_gub Posts: 3,328
    Surprised no one else has mentioned this, so here goes...

    HOUSTON, TX--(Marketwire - June 17, 2010) - Tops In Texas announced today voting has begun statewide on the Top Texas Sports Hero of All Time Contest. The contest voting lasts until the end of the year. Noticeably absent from the ten nominees are people such as Roger Clemens, Lance Armstrong and Carl Lewis. "They certainly meet the 'sports' litmus test to deserve to be a nominee on this list," said Tim Dillard, site host for Tops In Texas. "As we researched our top ten nominees, we felt that the three men notably left off the list have pressing questions regarding their potential to be immortalized as Top Texas Sports Hero of All Time."

    http://www.marketwire.com/press-release ... 278132.htm

    All three of those omitted have been linked with doping...

    and two of them are not Texans :roll:
    Gasping - but somehow still alive !
  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,584
    AidanR wrote:
    dennisn wrote:
    Trust me on this one BB. Your title "Armstrong is no ........." is completely wrong.
    While he might not be a hero to some idiots or politicians trying to make up some new award to give out, I can guarantee that not to many Texans would take kindly to your comment. Great way to get your *ss beat just about anywhere down in the Lone Star State. And they will do it too. And love doing it. :wink::wink:

    I thought that kind of behaviour was strongly frowned on in the Bible Belt? :wink:

    Actually, a BIT tongue in cheek and a lot of truth. If some of those Bible Belt people find out you're not religious enough for them they might just beat a bit more religion into you.
    Texas can be another world.
  • BikingBernieBikingBernie Posts: 2,163
    edited June 2010
    dennisn wrote:
    I can guarantee that not to many Texans would take kindly to your comment. Great way to get your *ss beat just about anywhere down in the Lone Star State. And they will do it too. And love doing it.
    dennisn wrote:
    If some of those Bible Belt people find out you're not religious enough for them they might just beat a bit more religion into you. Texas can be another world.
    I wonder, are you trying to undermine the common perception of what Texans / those from the Southern states / Bible belt are like, or trying to reinforce them? It all sort of reminds me of a Bill Hicks routine...

    "Hey, buddy! C'mere! Mr. Funny-man, c'mere! Hey, buddy, we're Christians, and we don't like what you said." "So then forgive me." Later, when I was hanging from the tree...

    Dennis has suggested that Texans 'love' violence. Whether this is true or not it seems that historically things were a lot worse than they are now...


    Henry Smith. Paris, Texas.

    The train arrived at Paris at twelve o'clock and was met by a surging mass of humanity. The Negro was placed upon a carnival float in mockery of a king upon his throne, and, followed by an immense crowd, was escorted through the city so that all might see the most inhuman monster known in current history. His clothes were torn off piecemeal and scattered in the crowd, people catching the shreds and putting them away as mementos. The child's father, her brother, and two uncles then gathered about the Negro as he lay fastened to the torture platform and thrust hot irons into his quivering flesh. It was horrible -- the man dying by slow torture in the midst of smoke from his own burning flesh. Every groan, every contortion of his body, was cheered by the thickly packed crowd of 10,000 persons, the mass of beings 600 yards in diameter, the scaffold being the center. After burning the feet and legs, the hot irons -- plenty of fresh ones being at hand -- were rolled up and down Smith's stomach, back, and arms. Then the eyes were burned out and irons were thrust down his throat. The men (including the 12-year-old brother) of the child's family having wreaked vengeance, the crowd piled all kinds of combustible stuff around the scaffold, poured oil on it and set it afire. The Negro rolled and tossed out of the mass, only to be pushed back by the people nearest him. He rolled out again and was roped and pulled back.


    In the American Southwest, people of Mexican descent often fell prey to the virulence of mob violence. On November 3, 1910, white citizens of the small ranching community of Rock Springs, Texas lynched a young Mexican cowboy to death for supposedly murdering an "Anglo" woman. Antonio Rodriguez was captured and taken a mile outside of town only to be tied to a mesquite cactus, doused in kerosene, and burned alive.


    Jesse Washington, Waco, Texas, 1916.

    Washington was a 17-year-old retarded farmhand who had confessed to raping and killing a white woman. He was castrated, mutilated, and burned alive by a cheering mob that included the mayor and the chief of police. An observer wrote that "Washington was beaten with shovels and bricks. . .[he] was castrated, and his ears were cut off. A tree supported the iron chain that lifted him above the fire. . . Wailing, the boy attempted to climb up the skillet hot chain. For this, the men cut off his fingers."
  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,584
    dennisn wrote:
    I can guarantee that not to many Texans would take kindly to your comment. Great way to get your *ss beat just about anywhere down in the Lone Star State. And they will do it too. And love doing it.
    I wonder, are you trying to undermine the common perception of what Texans / those from the Southern states / Bible belt are like, or trying to reinforce them? It all sort of reminds me of a Bill Hicks routine...

    "Hey, buddy! C'mere! Mr. Funny-man, c'mere! Hey, buddy, we're Christians, and we don't like what you said." "So then forgive me." Later, when I was hanging from the tree...

    As Dennis points out, Texans do seem to 'love' violence, and historically it seems that things were even worse than they are now...


    Henry Smith. Paris, Texas.

    The train arrived at Paris at twelve o'clock and was met by a surging mass of humanity. The Negro was placed upon a carnival float in mockery of a king upon his throne, and, followed by an immense crowd, was escorted through the city so that all might see the most inhuman monster known in current history. His clothes were torn off piecemeal and scattered in the crowd, people catching the shreds and putting them away as mementos. The child's father, her brother, and two uncles then gathered about the Negro as he lay fastened to the torture platform and thrust hot irons into his quivering flesh. It was horrible -- the man dying by slow torture in the midst of smoke from his own burning flesh. Every groan, every contortion of his body, was cheered by the thickly packed crowd of 10,000 persons, the mass of beings 600 yards in diameter, the scaffold being the center. After burning the feet and legs, the hot irons -- plenty of fresh ones being at hand -- were rolled up and down Smith's stomach, back, and arms. Then the eyes were burned out and irons were thrust down his throat. The men (including the 12-year-old brother) of the child's family having wreaked vengeance, the crowd piled all kinds of combustible stuff around the scaffold, poured oil on it and set it afire. The Negro rolled and tossed out of the mass, only to be pushed back by the people nearest him. He rolled out again and was roped and pulled back.


    In the American Southwest, people of Mexican descent often fell prey to the virulence of mob violence. On November 3, 1910, white citizens of the small ranching community of Rock Springs, Texas lynched a young Mexican cowboy to death for supposedly murdering an "Anglo" woman. Antonio Rodriguez was captured and taken a mile outside of town only to be tied to a mesquite cactus, doused in kerosene, and burned alive.


    Jesse Washington, Waco, Texas, 1916.

    Washington was a 17-year-old retarded farmhand who had confessed to raping and killing a white woman. He was castrated, mutilated, and burned alive by a cheering mob that included the mayor and the chief of police. An observer wrote that "Washington was beaten with shovels and bricks. . .[he] was castrated, and his ears were cut off. A tree supported the iron chain that lifted him above the fire. . . Wailing, the boy attempted to climb up the skillet hot chain. For this, the men cut off his fingers."

    What can I say? Horrible things happen all over the world. Not sure what your meaning is with the stories.
    Let's put it this way. LA is very well liked in Texas. Nothing more, nothing less.
  • bazbadgerbazbadger Posts: 553
    BB I think you might be obsessed!

    You sound like you need a break, have you considered a change of sport?

    Curling is quite 'clean' I've heard - though if you do find any quotes, please spare us... :)
    Mens agitat molem
  • BIG.AL.1BIG.AL.1 Posts: 97
    It's not often I comment on here I am more of a lurker although I have to make the following comment.............. Biking bernie your posts are getting boring and very very pathetic. It would appear you are some sort of google warrior. You have got three stories that are around 100 years old and are basically saying that if you come from Texas you 'love' violence. How about googling the population of Texas and then the violent crime statistics???? Work out the percentage of violent crimes per person. Bernie, if I may call you that. Go out and ride your bike and clear that head of yours. There is obviously not much in there so it should only take a hundred yards or so. As someone who comes on here to read about cycling you are spoiling this forum by keep ruining threads. Oh, and lay off the graph.
    AL
  • ratsbeyfusratsbeyfus Posts: 2,841
    BIG.AL.1 wrote:
    It's not often I comment on here I am more of a lurker although I have to make the following comment.............. Biking bernie your posts are getting boring and very very pathetic. It would appear you are some sort of google warrior. You have got three stories that are around 100 years old and are basically saying that if you come from Texas you 'love' violence. How about googling the population of Texas and then the violent crime statistics???? Work out the percentage of violent crimes per person. Bernie, if I may call you that. Go out and ride your bike and clear that head of yours. There is obviously not much in there so it should only take a hundred yards or so. As someone who comes on here to read about cycling you are spoiling this forum by keep ruining threads. Oh, and lay off the graph.
    AL

    Uhhh, the thread was started by BB... if you don't like what he's saying avoid his thread. Simple. The suggestion that 'folk in Texas won't take kindly to what your saying' was posted by dennisn.


    I had one of them red bikes but I don't any more. Sad face.

    @ratsbey
  • BikingBernieBikingBernie Posts: 2,163
    BIG.AL.1 wrote:
    You have got three stories that are around 100 years old and are basically saying that if you come from Texas you 'love' violence.
    Er, No. I clearly said that I was talking about the history of violence in Texas. I was also responding to what Dennis said...
    dennisn wrote:
    ...I can guarantee that not to many Texans would take kindly to your comment. Great way to get your *ss beat just about anywhere down in the Lone Star State. And they will do it too. And love doing it.
    I think you might be responding to the wrong person...
  • paulcuthbertpaulcuthbert Posts: 1,016
    BIG.AL.1 wrote:
    Biking bernie your posts are getting boring and very very pathetic. It would appear you are some sort of google warrior.

    Go out and ride your bike and clear that head of yours. There is obviously not much in there so it should only take a hundred yards or so. As someone who comes on here to read about cycling you are spoiling this forum by keep ruining threads. Oh, and lay off the graph

    Well put
  • BikingBernieBikingBernie Posts: 2,163
    P.s. As to the sort of racist attitudes that lead to the 'show lynching' phenomena being 100 years out of date, have you never heard of the Jena Six? Or James Byrd, dragged to death behind a pick-up truck in 1998? Or the similar and very recent case of Anthony Hill in South Carolina?
  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 25,887
    P.s. As to the sort of racist attitudes that lead to the 'show lynching' phenomena being 100 years out of date, have you never heard of the Jena Six? Or James Byrd, dragged to death behind a pick-up truck in 1998? Or the similar and very recent case of Anthony Hill in South Carolina?

    Isn't branding all Texans (or Americans, as you seem to do) racists, just bigotry in itself? At best, it's lazy ignorant generalization. There are good and bad Texans, just as there are good and bad Americans, Frenchmen, Ghanians, Koreans etc, etc.

    Of course, Bill Hicks, who you are fond of quoting, is from Houston, Texas.

    You say Texas has a history of violence. Well where doesn't? Antarctica maybe.

    You have derided Armstrong and others for generalising 'the French' yet you do exactly the same. It just adds to a supposition that I have made before: You and Armstrong are cut from the same cloth. You are both single mindedly obsessive to the exclusion of all else, you both see everything in black and white, you both make broad generalizations about populations, you both take intransigent and ultimately untenable positions at the extremes of arguments, yet both of you are utterly convinced that you are right.

    Maybe when you look at him, you see yourself too?
    Twitter: @RichN95
  • BIG.AL.1BIG.AL.1 Posts: 97
    BB your trolling is working on me. I am making my second post in 24hrs. I hope it livens up your life. You replied in the small minded petty attitude I expected. Which left me a little disappointed as I was hoping you may have made a dignified response.
    The James Byrd murder was basically the last recorded racist lynching in the USA. The other two examples you gave were completely and totally pointless. One was a group of black youths beating up a White student and the other an isolated murder that had nothing to do with race or 'lynching'. Very very pathetic.

    I am sure you will be along soon cutting and pasting my comments and making some bizarre argument.

    Oh, I forgot add that the reason I finally felt the need to speak up was because of your ridiculous comments on the kim kirchen thread.

    AL
  • BikingBernieBikingBernie Posts: 2,163
    edited June 2010
    RichN95 wrote:
    Isn't branding all Texans (or Americans, as you seem to do) racists, just bigotry in itself?
    And where in the above do I say that all Texans / Americans hold racist attitudes? (If anyone was making gross generalisations, it was Dennis). For the record I have never suggested such a thing. However it is an undeniable fact that racial discrimination is still a feature of American society, and one illustration of this is the way poverty disproportionately affects black people in the US.

    A $95,000 question: why are whites five times richer than blacks in the US?

    A huge wealth gap has opened up between black and white people in the US over the past quarter of a century – a difference sufficient to put two children through university – because of racial discrimination and economic policies that favour the affluent. A typical white family is now five times richer than its African-American counterpart of the same class, according to a report released today by Brandeis University in Massachusetts.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/ma ... cher-black
  • BikingBernieBikingBernie Posts: 2,163
    edited June 2010
    BIG.AL.1 wrote:
    The James Byrd murder was basically the last recorded racist lynching in the USA. The other two examples you gave were completely and totally pointless. One was a group of black youths beating up a White student and the other an isolated murder that had nothing to do with race or 'lynching'.
    Really? That's all there was to it?

    Apart from the noose, this is an everyday story of modern America

    The racial tensions which flared in a small southern town have laid bare the bias infecting the nation's justice system

    Gary Younge in Jena
    Guardian
    Monday September 17, 2007

    The four-hour drive from New Orleans to Jena takes you over long bridges, across still bayoux and deep into the remote backwoods of Louisiana. It's a journey that starts in the city that has become a byword for racial division and infrastructural neglect, following Hurricane Katrina. It then heads north-east through Opelousas where, as in so much of the south, people are literally segregated to death. There are two Catholic churches in the centre of town - Holy Ghost, for African Americans, and St Landry, for whites. In between is the cemetery where, by law and then by custom, blacks and whites have been buried according to their race - separate and finally equal, if only in the afterlife. And finally, it lands in the small town of Jena, surrounded by forests of pine where, it seems, even the flora can be racialised.

    It was here that Kenneth Purvis asked the headmaster at Jena high school if he could sit under the "white tree" - the tree in the school courtyard where the white children used to hang out during break. The principal said he could sit where he liked. Purvis took him at his word. The next day he went with his cousin Bryant and stood under the tree. The day after that white students hung three nooses there.

    If the symbolic threat of a schoolyard lynching makes this sound like a tale from a bygone era, then what happened next belongs very much to the present. It is a story of institutional indifference and judicial impunity that today condemns black American men: not to end their lives hanging from a tree, but to spend it rotting in jail. It illustrates to those who would like to draw a line under the civil rights era that they must first contend with its legacy before claiming to have conquered history. It serves as a salient example that legal barriers to integration may have been removed - itself no mean feat - but the ultimate goal of equality remains elusive. And it shows that just because you are allowed to do something - even something as basic as sitting under a tree - it doesn't mean that you are able to.

    Back in Jena, the local, overwhelmingly white school board, considered the nooses a youthful prank and handed down brief suspensions. This made black parents and students angry and sparked months of racial tension. Police were called to the school several times because of fights between black and white students.

    The principal called an assembly where the local district attorney, Reed Walters, told them "See this pen? I can end your lives with the stroke of a pen." The black students say when he said it he was looking at them; Walters denies it.

    In an unsolved arson case a wing of the school was burned down. A few days later, Justin Sloan, a white man, attacked black students who tried to go to a white party in town. Sloan was charged with battery and put on probation. A few days after that another white boy pulled a gun on three black students in a convenience store. The black student wrestled the gun from him and took it home. The black student was charged with theft of a firearm, second-degree robbery and disturbing the peace. The white student who produced the gun was not charged.

    On December 4 a group of black students attacked a white student, Justin Barker, after they heard him bragging about a racial assault his friend had made. Barker, 17, had concussion and his eye was swollen shut. He spent a few hours in hospital and, on his release, went to a party where friends described him as "his usual smiling self".

    The six black students were then arrested and charged with attempted second-degree murder. Such a charge requires use of a deadly weapon. Walters argued that the trainers used to kick Barker were indeed deadly weapons. Mychal Bell, 17, became the first of what are now known as the Jena Six to be convicted on reduced charges by an all-white jury and faced up to 22 years in jail.
  • BikingBernieBikingBernie Posts: 2,163
    Another interesting story about modern-day racism in the USA...

    Obama should realise that segregation may be over, but exclusion lives on

    On 29 June, 65 children from the Creative Steps summer camp in Philadelphia took a trip to the private suburban Valley Club swimming pool for a dip. The Valley Club knew they were coming and how many there were because the camp had signed a contract and paid $1,950 in advance for weekly visits throughout the summer. But somehow the arrival of the mostly African-American and Latino children was still a shock. As the black and brown kids got into the pool, the white parents pulled their kids out.

    One child overheard a woman ask: "What are those black kids doing here?" Another reportedly expressed fears that the children might steal something. A few days later the club revoked the contract and refunded the advance. When asked why, the club's president, John Duesler, said: "There is a lot of concern that a lot of kids would change the complexion … the atmosphere of the club."

    ...The Valley Club was founded in 1954, the year the supreme court ruled on Brown v Board of Education making racial segregation illegal. This was no coincidence. That decade had seen a rash of efforts to integrate pools, which had sparked white flight. "When pools were desegregated, white people abandoned them en masse," explains Jeff Wiltse, associate history professor at the University of Montana and author of Contested Waters: A Social History of Swimming Pools in America. "There was a boom in the construction of private pools where middle-class whites could still exclude non-whites … I don't know the details of the founding of the Valley Club, but both the time and the place in which it was built fits right into that story."

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree ... ama-speech
  • ratsbeyfusratsbeyfus Posts: 2,841
    Can this thread be moved into the 'Pro Racism' section of the forum.


    I had one of them red bikes but I don't any more. Sad face.

    @ratsbey
  • bazbadgerbazbadger Posts: 553
    BB any credibility your previous posts may have have engendered you with on this forum is now looking thin on the ground.

    Why not try something positive (uh oh...) instead of going on the rant?
    Mens agitat molem
  • BIG.AL.1BIG.AL.1 Posts: 97
    Bernie-I accused you earlier in this thread of being a troll. I retract that and apologize. You are quite clearly not a troll just a very ignorant uneducated person with a keyboard. I honestly thought you were just stirring things up but after your last few posts you have revealed yourself.

    I was hoping you may be embarassed by my post and lay off the trolling/ignorance but you have just ploughed on with the cut and paste. Your comments on the Kim Kirchen thread were pathetic although I doubt you even realise.

    Your lack of knowledge is spectacular. You cut and paste at will without being able to understand or process what you are reading. The USA has a population of 300million people. Over 60million voted for a black president. Have a think about those figures.

    AL
  • colintcolint Posts: 1,707
    BIG.AL.1 wrote:
    Bernie-I accused you earlier in this thread of being a troll. I retract that and apologize. You are quite clearly not a troll just a very ignorant uneducated person with a keyboard. I honestly thought you were just stirring things up but after your last few posts you have revealed yourself.

    I was hoping you may be embarassed by my post and lay off the trolling/ignorance but you have just ploughed on with the cut and paste. Your comments on the Kim Kirchen thread were pathetic although I doubt you even realise.

    Your lack of knowledge is spectacular. You cut and paste at will without being able to understand or process what you are reading. The USA has a population of 300million people. Over 60million voted for a black president. Have a think about those figures.

    AL


    Al you're wasting your time mate. He's a one eyed bigotted kn*b incapable of constructing a point of his own, which is why he has to resort to copy and pasting so much. Kind of reminds me of his predecessor Aurelio. Don't feed the trolls, he'll either discover a life or get banned eventually
    Planet X N2A
    Trek Cobia 29er
  • iainf72iainf72 Posts: 15,784
    colint wrote:
    Kind of reminds me of his predecessor Aurelio. Don't feed the trolls, he'll either discover a life or get banned eventually

    Aurelio = Bernie post ban.
    Fckin' Quintana … that creep can roll, man.
  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 25,887
    And where in the above do I say that all Americans hold such racist attitudes? For the record I haver never suggested such a thing. However it is an undeniable fact that racial discrimination is still a feature of American society, and one illustration of this is the way poverty disproportionately affects black people in the US.

    At least America managed to elect a black President. You choose to live in France, a country in which Jean-Marie Le Pen attracts 10-20% of the electorate, even coming second in the 2002 Presidential Election.
    Twitter: @RichN95
  • westerburkwesterburk Posts: 37
    Steady on BB youve got the righteous and indignant on the warpath, next thing youll be accused of Racism (edit sorry already happened) and then irrespective of what you may or may not have said its a one way trip to bannsville.
  • westerburkwesterburk Posts: 37
    RichN95 wrote:
    And where in the above do I say that all Americans hold such racist attitudes? For the record I haver never suggested such a thing. However it is an undeniable fact that racial discrimination is still a feature of American society, and one illustration of this is the way poverty disproportionately affects black people in the US.

    At least America managed to elect a black President. You choose to live in France, a country in which Jean-Marie Le Pen attracts 10-20% of the electorate, even coming second in the 2002 Presidential Election.

    So what? why is electing a half black or half white president a good thing unless you are either racist or a raging anti racist? You then cast comment on the french choice of political leadership and damming a whole country.

    This kind of biggeted comment has no place in the Pro race forum.
    IainF your equally quick to rage about this sort of stuff.

    BRING BACK THE GRAPH
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