Bit of a long brake one...

claret73
claret73 Posts: 68
edited June 2010 in MTB buying advice
Have an old (1990's) Trek Aluminium that I'd like to build up again as it's hanging in the garage & the road bike isn't getting out...

Just can't believe how much has changed since I last owned my Litespeed...

So, am very out of sorts with the gear available. I'm going to try (at risk of upsetting shop owners) buy most bits from ebay. I'm quite happy to pick up some bargains & won't be looking to Bling it up with latest fancy bits, just solid, reliable gear to get me back out on the Trails.

I'm havng some issues deciding on Brakes. The frame isn't Disc ready but the suspension forks will be. So have found some posts to having disc on front & VBrake on back, unless I got an adaptor like A2Z which doesn't get good reviews at Wiggle? Would this be awkward as wouldn't I have 2 different levers? Or can I get same levers for different braking set up?

Anybody doing the same? Advice as to best way forward? I quite like the idea of a disk as fork is disk set up, but no idea as to its benefits over VBrakes...
Cheers

Comments

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    Discs are in a whole world apart from V-brakes. They work consistently in all weather, even when they're sopping wet, offer more power, are actually easier to set up, less "grabby", aren't affected by slight buckles in the rims, and generally, are more controllable.
    If you do opt for discs on the front, V on the back, I don't think you'd regret it.
    The back brake is of little use anyway, so that setup whould work fine.

    I have a Shimano Saint disc brake on the front of my old bike, and an ancient Hope C2 (although at the time it was bought, I think it was just known as a "hope brake", it's that old!)
    Both completely different levers, one being a full 4-finger lever, and the other a newer single or double finger lever. Doesn't cause any problems at all.
  • supersonic
    supersonic Posts: 82,708
    It is surprising how good a well set up v is, especially if you opt for Kool Stop pads and a good lever like a Speed Dial. I find it mcuh easier to get the feel I want from Vs even if they lack the power in the wet of a disc.
  • I good V-Brake setup is superior to a mediocre disk, but you'll feel a definate difference if you buy a decent disk.

    To digress slightly from the original subject I'm not sure if i'd reccomend going hydraulic, cable brakes are definately simpler and cheaper, but once one gets the hang of servicing hydraulic brakes that doesn't matter much; and the extra bite (especially for the Magura hydraulic rim brakes) and modulation is rather nice.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    What maintenance on hydraulic discs? Apart from the very rare bleed, they're pretty much fit and forget.
  • Oxygen Thief
    Oxygen Thief Posts: 649
    Hydraulics seem tobe a bit like some plug and plays you get for computers. They're plug and play allright if they work, but when they don't your fucked!
  • What maintenance on hydraulic discs? Apart from the very rare bleed, they're pretty much fit and forget.
    Hydraulics seem tobe a bit like some plug and plays you get for computers. They're plug and play allright if they work, but when they don't your farked!
    That, basically; I've had a lot of trouble with my front brake recently, requiring multiple bleeds, and rebuild. Though it's all fine now and I figure after 4 years of living maintanaince free it's not too bad.

    Another point to consider with disks is the need to give the disks a good clean and degrease regularly (even greasy fingers can negatively effect them); and similarly replacing or flaming the pads if there is even a small amount of grease contamination.
  • supersonic
    supersonic Posts: 82,708
    While discs are far more common of course, the main questions in the tech are always about discs whether it be warped rotors, screeching, rubbing, pistons not retracting, contamination, set up problems, pad replacement, bleed problems, adjustmenst etc etc.

    Some people really do struggle.
  • anton_spb
    anton_spb Posts: 12
    and dont forget about prices. Good vi is about 3-4 times cheaper than good hydralic disc brake. Btw, I have front disc and reare vi on one of my bikes - works perfectly, no problem with different levers. Regarding solid & reliable parts - shimano xt is enough seems to me. I havent ever used sram components but guess they have at least the same quality as shimano. Pay attention for choosing fork as I guess old trek frames expect fork with 2-3" travel. So it's possible that bike geometry will be changed in wrong way if you set up for example, 4" travel fork.

    Cheers
  • synchronicity
    synchronicity Posts: 1,415
    supersonic wrote:
    While discs are far more common of course, the main questions in the tech are always about discs whether it be warped rotors, screeching, rubbing, pistons not retracting, contamination, set up problems, pad replacement, bleed problems, adjustmenst etc etc.

    Some people really do struggle.

    Yep. They're fussier to set up correctly and maintain that way, for sure.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    I just don't get it, i really don't. Set up your disc brakes, and they're fine for potentially years.
    V-brakes? Argh, setting the toe in and angle of the brake pads was a complete nightmare.
  • synchronicity
    synchronicity Posts: 1,415
    Tell that to my bikes yeehaamcgee. :x

    They come back after a week and need the alignment seeing to. Between pistons seizing up and whatnot, I think they are not all that great. Having said that, the roads here in Tenerife are something else... :twisted:
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    roads?