What real benefit would I gain from trading up?

zanelad
zanelad Posts: 269
edited June 2010 in Road beginners
Hello Forumites,

I ride between 12 and 16 miles, 5 times a week to lose a few pounds and get a little fitter. At the moment I ride a hybrid, which I like and is comfortable. Lately, I've been thinking about trading up to a flat bar road bike, especially as my LBS has recently started to stock them. The Flight 05 is drawing me into parting with my savings, incurring the wrath of my wife and generally making me feel unhappy with my current ride.

Would I notice any real benefit? I'd hate to spend the thick end of £1,300 and find out a few weeks down the line that I've nothing to show for it except a bit of bling and a large dent in the family purse.

Tell me I'm being a tart and to keep the hybrid.
:oops:

Comments

  • skyd0g
    skyd0g Posts: 2,540
    You would notice a greater benefit with a full-on drop bar road bike.
    Cycling weakly
  • hopper1
    hopper1 Posts: 4,389
    Zanelad wrote:
    Hello Forumites,

    I ride between 12 and 16 miles, 5 times a week to lose a few pounds and get a little fitter. At the moment I ride a hybrid, which I like and is comfortable. Lately, I've been thinking about trading up to a flat bar road bike, especially as my LBS has recently started to stock them. The Flight 05 is drawing me into parting with my savings, incurring the wrath of my wife and generally making me feel unhappy with my current ride.

    Would I notice any real benefit? I'd hate to spend the thick end of £1,300 and find out a few weeks down the line that I've nothing to show for it except a bit of bling and a large dent in the family purse.

    Tell me I'm being a tart and to keep the hybrid.
    :oops:

    I didn't know there was a difference!
    If you're comfortable, and you're not looking for a racier position, etc, then stick the cash in your back pocket for now... :wink:
    Start with a budget, finish with a mortgage!
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    Try some more road oriented tyres first...
  • top_bhoy
    top_bhoy Posts: 1,424
    you're a tart and keep the hybrid :wink:

    If the current ride is comfortable enough and adequately helps meet your goals - why change for changes sake? You will want to try several other bikes out to see how they compare to your current one. I think you would see a difference but only you can say whether it is significant enough to justify the cost.

    While you are unsure, I suggest you do nothing. Last thing you need is to hand over 1300 notes (which is no small amount of money) from the family purse and not to be entirely happy.

    my 2p worth!
  • stokepa31
    stokepa31 Posts: 560
    skyd0g wrote:
    You would notice a greater benefit with a full-on drop bar road bike.

    +1

    spend the£1300 on a proper road bike and you will notice a difference
    Burning Fat Not Rubber

    Scott CR1
    Genesis IO ID
    Moda Canon
  • ALaPlage
    ALaPlage Posts: 732
    Agree with Hopper. There would be little difference I imagine between a Hybrid and a flat bar road bike - depends on the spec of your Hybrid now ie.

    Some Hybrids have disc brakes, some have front suspension forks. If yours doesnt and is fitted with standard rim brakes and fixed fork then there would be almost no difference - gearing may differ slightly as many hybrids use MTB gearing which tends to run different ratios. My Boardman Hybrid Pro for example had a 50/36 at the front versus my Trek Madone road bike which is a 50/34 compact. At the back the Boardman was an 11/32 whereas the road bike has an 11/28 cassette and most road bikes with compact groupset are standard at 12/25 on the rear.

    Riding position with a flat bar on a road bike would be very similar to your current steed.

    Drop bars give you more hand positions and you can sit up on the hoods or get low and aerodynamic on the drops.

    If you do want to get the benefit of a road bike then re-consider and go for a "proper" roadie with drop handlebars. Generally road bikes are lighter than Hybrids particularly hybrids with disc brakes and suspension forks. My Boardman (disc brakes no suspension) was 21lbs and the Trek is 15.5lbs - noticeable on climbs and when putting the power down as the bike accelerates quicker.

    I sold my Hybrid for a road bike to get a lighter bike, more suited to riding on the road which is all I do anyway, the drop bars allowing more options when riding and changing position which can help with comfort rather than being fixed as the flat bar makes you.
    As you extend your mileage a road bike will come into its own.

    If you plan to stick with your current regime then save your money - if you plan to build your cycling and possibly enter sportives for example in the future or just increase your mileage then a proper road bike would be more suitable.
    Trek Madone 5.9
    Kinesis Crosslight T4
  • danowat
    danowat Posts: 2,877
    Hybrid > flat bar road bike, I was thinking that they are pretty much one in the same?.

    I guess the biggest difference for me (Hybrid vs my roadie) is speed, and the effort required to maintain said speed, I can do my 17 mile commute in 4mins less on the roadie vs the hybrid with the same effort.

    The next biggest difference is harshness of ride, the roadie feels like an old bone shaker when ridden back to back with the hybrid.

    The roadie is much more fun to ride though.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    I wouldn't spend £1300 to go from one flat barred bike to another. OK, it might be lighter and have better components, but I think you'd be better off saving the dosh.

    Better bet would be a second hand drop barred road bike. You could get a quality machine for £6-800
  • Dave-M
    Dave-M Posts: 206
    If you buy a flat barred road bike, you'll be back on here in 12 months wanting an upgrade to a drop barred bike.

    Been there, done that!

    Although flat bars looklike they may offer more comfort, they dont. The extra places to hold on drop bars offers greater comfort.
    2010 Specialized Allez Elite
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper
    2009 Quintana Roo Seduza
  • kayakerchris
    kayakerchris Posts: 361
    I would agree with not buying flat bar road bike.

    I bought a boardman carbon £999 on C2W and love it. However I have now changed the bottom bracket for a proper SRAM one £19 which has made an amazing difference and also changed the wheels.

    If i was buying again without the C2W, I would definately go secondhand and then look to rapidly changing bottom bracket as i reckon this made a gears difference and the wheels. That way with £1300 you could get a superb bike.
  • I went from a Hybred/flat barred bike (specialized Sirrus) to a road bike a month ago and have not looked back
  • zanelad
    zanelad Posts: 269
    Hello Again,

    Thanks for the replies, you've told me what my head has been saying for a while, and what Mrs Z says to nearly every idea I get, "Don't Do It"!

    I'd changed the wheels on the Hybrid (a Ridgeback Velocity) for some Mavics as I kept breaking spokes in the rear wheel, and the tyres are road tyres with little in the way of tread.

    I'll keep the money and avoid my LBS for a while.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    I went from a Hybred/flat barred bike (specialized Sirrus) to a road bike a month ago and have not looked back

    Could be dangerous, especially when moving across to turn right...
  • danowat
    danowat Posts: 2,877
    NapoleonD wrote:
    I went from a Hybred/flat barred bike (specialized Sirrus) to a road bike a month ago and have not looked back

    Could be dangerous, especially when moving across to turn right...

    Sharp 8)
  • macondo01
    macondo01 Posts: 706
    StanwaySteve62 wrote:
    I went from a Hybred/flat barred bike (specialized Sirrus) to a road bike a month ago and have not looked back


    Could be dangerous, especially when moving across to turn right...

    Heh, heh!

    and no 'look' to the rider you dropped without looking back :wink:
    .
    "Let not the sands of time get in your lunch"

    National Lampoon
  • zanelad
    zanelad Posts: 269
    Well, I took the advice from the majority of you and bought a road bike (drop bars, not flat 8) ) and I think that it was the right decision.

    I bought a 2nd hand one to keep the expenditure down and appease Mrs Z.

    After a coupe of rides In the new bike, I rode the Hybrid and it felt very strange. Far too upright, but with a comfy saddle after the rock hard one that's on the road bike.

    Will my backside get used to the plank or should I swap the saddles over?

    Yours, thinking about SPD and cleats now :?

    Z.
  • macondo01
    macondo01 Posts: 706
    edited June 2010
    Good!

    Give your bottom time to adjust to the harder saddle. It is odd to think that they can become comfy. In a few weeks you'll be thinking how did I sit on that old armchair of a saddle? Have you some nice bib shorts/shorts though?

    Cleats! Yep you've caught the bug. It is the way to go. Just be sure to set them up properly.
    .
    "Let not the sands of time get in your lunch"

    National Lampoon
  • danowat
    danowat Posts: 2,877
    Your ass will get used to it, infact, my "comfy" hybrid saddle now causes me discomfort, as its wider and softer than the saddle on my Allez!
  • make sure you go spd-SL
    so much better (for me) than SPD