Forum home Road cycling forum Road buying advice

Bike suitable for reluctant cyclist wife!

pottsstevepottssteve Posts: 4,043
edited June 2010 in Road buying advice
OK, here's the deal.

I ride a 'cross bike, mainly on road and for commuting. At the moment I ride on my own as we live in Hong Kong (steep hills, hot weather, dangerous roads etc). Soon however we will move to the Netherlands. I want to get my son a bike as he can ride but hasn't done so for a couple of years. I also want to get my wife a bike so we can do family trips out; nothing too strenuous, building up to 30 km or so. However, my wife's not a keen cyclist, (her main complaint being a sore backside after cycling) so I want something which is comfortable for her to ride, which will be fast enough to keep up when I pedal slowly along. As if that wasn't enough, I don't want to spend a lot in case she really decides it's not her thing.

I'll be getting her some padded shorts to help cope with the sore @rse but don't really know what kind of bike would be best. So, any ideas of models? Would she be better on an mtb or traditional Dutch bike than a crosser or hybrid? All ideas appreciated.

Cheers,
Steve
Head Hands Heart Lungs Legs

Posts

  • GyatsoLaGyatsoLa Posts: 667
    Are you buying in the Netherlands or in HK?

    I don't know if they have one in HK, but in Taiwan Giant have bike shops dedicated to women only, with a big range from cheap beginners bikes to top of the range stuff (and they have a much more diverse range of bikes in Asia than they sell in Europe). It might be worth checking if there is one you can visit.

    I don't know whats available in the Netherlands but I would imagine the traditional Dutch bike would be cheapest to get and most comfortable - but they are super heavy, you'd have to be cycling very slowly for her to keep up.
  • stratcatstratcat Posts: 160
    I had a similar situation with my wife.
    She didn't like the idea of mountain biking but wasn't too keen on the idea of traffic.
    Someone gave her an old womens shopper which she used for a couple of trips, but it was a monster. Really heavy censored gears etc. So I bought her one of these
    http://www.trekbikes.com/uk/en/bikes/road/fx/72fxwsdz/

    The gearing is a bit high for around here (although she manages just fine) but would be great without the big hills to worry about. She loves it. Easy reach to the brakes and a womens specific saddle. She only complains about having a sore bum after we've done long rides (4/5 hours+)
    My wife does wear cycling shorts but prefers things like
    http://www.evanscycles.com/products/altura/womens-synchro-3-4-baggy-shorts-ec002018
    to lycra shorts. Her faves are a skirt with a cycle short built in like
    http://www.evanscycles.com/products/northwave/flower-womens-skirt-with-liner-short-ec018364

    I think the bug has bitten, she'll often go for a quick blast on her own and I caught her eyeing up the women specific road bikes in the LBS :D
  • crankycrankcrankycrank Posts: 1,830
    Maybe she would prefer to ride with you on one of these. http://urbanvelo.org/wordpress/wp-conte ... sic_03.jpg
  • pottsstevepottssteve Posts: 4,043
    Hi Guys,
    Thanks for the detailed feedback so far.

    GyatsoLa - I'll be buying in the Netherlands as we're leaving quite soon. I had looked at the Giant models but will see what's available in Europe.

    stratcat - the Trek looks like it might fit the bill; I'll run it past her. I've got to try and convince her that a big squishy saddle is not the best idea. Thanks also for the info on clothing - she certainly won't want lycra bibs! :D
    Head Hands Heart Lungs Legs
  • DubaiNeilDubaiNeil Posts: 246
    Depending on her fitness level, and the age of your son, consider the electric assistance bikes.

    My French cousin has one for himself, and a woman's version for his 10 year old son, and they go out for 50km+ rides in a fairly hilly part of the South of France. The electric assistance makes it easier to get up any steepish hills (not that you may have any where you are moving to), give a boost on the flatter bits and let the rider rest when necessary.

    They have the own brand Decathalon models, and while not being very high tech (or lightweight!) they do what my cousin needs very well.

    The saddles are more "armchair" than "racer" but were comfortable enough when I had a spin on it.

    Ignore at will :)

    Neil
  • WheelspinnerWheelspinner Posts: 5,859
    DubaiNeil wrote:
    The electric assistance makes it easier to get up any steepish hills (not that you may have any where you are moving to), give a boost on the flatter bits and let the rider rest when necessary.

    The OP is moving to the Netherlands FFS...

    That's the place where speed humps rate as Cat 1 climbs.
    Open O-1.0 Open One+ BMC TE29 Titus Racer X Ti Seven 622SL Kestrel RT1000 On One Scandal Cervelo RS
  • ScaldedCatScaldedCat Posts: 111
    A Pashley trike, with basket front and back. Great for the shopping. :lol:
  • pottsstevepottssteve Posts: 4,043
    Thanks for the advice; please keep it coming.

    My son is 9 and quite fit - he can walk 10k up and down the steep hills in HK, so should easily manage a 30-40 km flat cycle ride. I'll certainly look into electric assistance bikes for the wife; then we'll be able to go a bit faster. :D
    Head Hands Heart Lungs Legs
  • DubaiNeilDubaiNeil Posts: 246
    DubaiNeil wrote:
    The electric assistance makes it easier to get up any steepish hills (not that you may have any where you are moving to), give a boost on the flatter bits and let the rider rest when necessary.

    The OP is moving to the Netherlands FFS...

    That's the place where speed humps rate as Cat 1 climbs.
    DubaiNeil wrote:
    The electric assistance makes it easier to get up any steepish hills (not that you may have any where you are moving to), give a boost on the flatter bits and let the rider rest when necessary.

    :roll: :D

    @ Pottssteve

    You are not allowed to draft your wife into a headwind though :)

    Has your user name got anything to do with moving to Holland? (Just to keep the old chestnuts going...)

    Neil
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    I think you need to speak to your wife rather than us. Maybe she just really doesnt like cycling - so no matter what bike she has she wont use it ?

    When you get to Holland can you try a few hire bikes out - and see what she thinks ? Electric bike could be an excellent idea - but you'd need to get her to try before wasting money ?
  • pottsstevepottssteve Posts: 4,043
    Wife update:

    I mentioned electric bikes (hoping to draft :) ) and she wasn't too keen, saying she'd rather pedal up the hills. Maybe those tapes I've been playing to her in her sleep of Alberto Contador climbing Alp d'Huez are paying off subliminally...
    Head Hands Heart Lungs Legs
  • andy_wrxandy_wrx Posts: 3,396
    I'd maybe wait until Holland and see what everyone else is riding, wearing, look like.

    Thousands of cyclists, most commuters, shopping, leisure, family, etc, etc.

    Hardly anyone on a roadbike, practically no-one in lycra or wearing a helmet.

    Your wife, if not a keen cyclist, might want to fit in with the flow...
  • pottsstevepottssteve Posts: 4,043
    andy_wrx wrote:
    I'd maybe wait until Holland and see what everyone else is riding, wearing, look like.

    Thousands of cyclists, most commuters, shopping, leisure, family, etc, etc.

    Hardly anyone on a roadbike, practically no-one in lycra or wearing a helmet.

    Your wife, if not a keen cyclist, might want to fit in with the flow...


    Thanks, Andy,

    I'd agree with your first point, but being in the "hilly" South maybe not the second. I've already found 2 cycle clubs based in Maastricht who look like they take it seriously; lycra and drop bars included!
    Head Hands Heart Lungs Legs
Sign In or Register to comment.