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Is it realistc to commute 22.4miles? Each wy

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  • tailwindhometailwindhome Posts: 16,138
    Family>Friends>Career>Cycling

    Go for it. Whats the worst that could happen?

    You have a couple of years of all year round cycling in your legs. You'll be fine.

    What's the facilities like at the new job?
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  • prj45prj45 Posts: 2,208
    I've been doing 20-24 miles each way for the past few weeks, five days a week (with a couple of 40 miles at the weekend. Felt like taking a break today, but I have been riding a lot.
  • will3will3 Posts: 2,173
    Given the choice of 1.5 hours on the train or 1.5 hours on the bike I think you'd be loopy to take the train. You'll always have a seat on the bike, unless some tool nicks it.

    Also you will get silly fit. I've just stepped off the bike after a slightly extended route home (nice evening etc etc) 43 miles and I don't really feel knackered. two years ago, I'd now be on the sofa having a kip, but now it's just normal and I'll get on with whatever needs doing.
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,870
    will3 wrote:
    Given the choice of 1.5 hours on the train or 1.5 hours on the bike I think you'd be loopy to take the train. You'll always have a seat on the bike, unless some tool nicks it.

    Also you will get silly fit. I've just stepped off the bike after a slightly extended route home (nice evening etc etc) 43 miles and I don't really feel knackered. two years ago, I'd now be on the sofa having a kip, but now it's just normal and I'll get on with whatever needs doing.

    That's because you have a screw loose :roll:
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  • roger_merrimanroger_merriman Posts: 6,156
    DonDaddyD wrote:
    ITB, new job.

    Roger, two trains or I could drive. Driving I'm not keen on as traffic around London (avoiding the Congestion charge) could make the journey well over 2hrs. Two different train journeys or bike = 1hr30.

    I'm probably going to do the first month by train and then ease in the fact that I cycle to work gently...

    given the time, I'd take the bike, trains are late and so on. but a bike is fairly even timings.
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,550
    I've been finding that taking a day off the bike during the week really helps me develop my fitness on my 15-mile each way hilly commute. I can push harder on the days I do ride and I'm less fatigued at work at the end of the week. I'm 45 and only started commuting at the beginning of Feb so getting fit is slower than if I was in my 20's but it's definitely coming - I'm feeling the ride less and less and getting quicker. Reached a benchmark of 100,000ft of climbing this week - always motivating to hit big numbers.
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  • i'm 41, fat and reasonably unfit. i do 41 miles everyday. have done for 10 weeks. first 2 weeks were hell, now it's fun. i do it with upto 20kgs front luggage on a brompton. i go rossendale - manchester- back to hilly hilly rossendale. MTFU and get on with it you soft southern cat.... :D:D:D:D
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  • always_tyredalways_tyred Posts: 4,965
    This thread is like a Python sketch.

    I used to dream of living in a coridoor.

    A cardboard box? We used to live in a wet paper bag in a septic tank and we had to get up half an hour before we went to bed.....

    DDD - you can do it regularly, but you WILL need a plan B, eg. the train, cycling one way, leaving bike at work (if possible) , rest days.

    You do know you'll never see that mystery woman again if you change routes, right?
  • BentMikeyBentMikey Posts: 4,895
    Do it DDD. I'm on 22 miles each way, plus doing a very tiring physical job (skate instructor). Main points are to pay a lot of attention to eating, drinking, and rest. Oh, and it really helps to have a fast bike.

    I'd not bother with driving/training in for the first month. The first day maybe, but after that I'd be using as much of that time as possible to ride in and acclimatize.
  • Wallace1492Wallace1492 Posts: 3,707
    22.4 mile commute? Well, a few years ago, my company offered me a job in Belgium, so I decided to cycle there, but before I arrived, they changed offices to Rome, and on I went... But then they moved to Istanbul, and I kept going..... Eventually when they moved to New York, I resigned.

    The next Year I got offered a job in Anchorage, but they moved to Vancouver, then to Mexico, and eventually Tierro Del Fuego....

    So, 22.4 miles is not even worth getting on a bike for!!

    Yours,

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  • always_tyredalways_tyred Posts: 4,965
    BentMikey wrote:
    Do it DDD. I'm on 22 miles each way, plus doing a very tiring physical job (skate instructor). Main points are to pay a lot of attention to eating, drinking, and rest. Oh, and it really helps to have a fast bike.

    I'd not bother with driving/training in for the first month. The first day maybe, but after that I'd be using as much of that time as possible to ride in and acclimatize.
    Sudden changes in excersise volume = injury.

    The feasibility of this sort of thing depends very much on what you do in between commuting, and how long for.
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 19,455
    Sudden changes in excersise volume = injury.

    Yup. IIRC you are not supposed to step up the volume or intensity of your riding by more than 10% at a time, so to get from 20 miles a day to 44 miles a day will take a bit of time.

    Maybe first week cycle to/from Liverpool Street and train the rest (about 11 miles I'm guessing from where you live), then move to the next station along the following week and so on until you find yourself riding all the way to Ilford.
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  • CafewandaCafewanda Posts: 2,788
    itboffin wrote:
    will3 wrote:
    Given the choice of 1.5 hours on the train or 1.5 hours on the bike I think you'd be loopy to take the train. You'll always have a seat on the bike, unless some tool nicks it.

    Also you will get silly fit. I've just stepped off the bike after a slightly extended route home (nice evening etc etc) 43 miles and I don't really feel knackered. two years ago, I'd now be on the sofa having a kip, but now it's just normal and I'll get on with whatever needs doing.

    That's because you have a screw loose :roll:

    Pot and kettle? :wink:
  • wgwarburtonwgwarburton Posts: 1,863
    rjsterry wrote:
    Sudden changes in excersise volume = injury.

    Yup. IIRC you are not supposed to step up the volume or intensity of your riding by more than 10% at a time, so to get from 20 miles a day to 44 miles a day will take a bit of time.

    Maybe first week cycle to/from Liverpool Street and train the rest (about 11 miles I'm guessing from where you live), then move to the next station along the following week and so on until you find yourself riding all the way to Ilford.

    I read somewhere that muscles strengthen faster than tendons, so there's a period when you're particularly injury-prone because your muscles have beefed up but the tendons are stilll strengthening.
    DDD, you mentioned needing to catch two trains to do the trip by PT. Can you bike to the second one to balance the trip, or is it not that simple...?

    Cheers,
    W.
  • coopster_the_1stcoopster_the_1st Posts: 5,158
    DDD,

    Buy a hack bike that you would be comfortable locking up at Liverpool Street station.

    Cycle daily to Liverpool Street station thus avoiding the crowded part of the commute.

    Take train to Ilford and as you are going agains the main flow of commuters, you should get a seat both Journeys.

    If feeling strong you can continue on the bike to work. If not feeling great, you can just get the train for the whole journey.

    Make it easy to switch depending on the weather/season you are in.
  • schweizschweiz Posts: 1,644
    I've just jumped from a 26km round trip commute to a 60km round trip commute.

    I'm doing the journey to work in 56 mins and home takes just over an hour as I live halfway up a hill (mountain?) I'm reasonably fit, in terms of riding the distance, from recreational cycling so the extra km are not a problem.

    The first few weeks are hard to get used to but the body adapts fairly quickly. Just listen to your body and if you're aching or feeling particularly tired then have a day off the bike and also watch what your eating. I reckon my commute burns 1800 calories or so.

    The drive is about 25-30 mins each way so it only takes me an hour extra each day and I just see that as my training as in my old job, I would often go home, dump my bag and go straight out for a ride anyway.
  • oscarbudgieoscarbudgie Posts: 850
    I wouldn't consider the distance a problem and the journey by any other means would be a nightmare. Ilford's not too bad imho - there's plenty worse sh!tholes in London. Have you considered the Woolwich free ferry as part of the journey? Bike friendly + no need to queue with the cars to get on and once you're on the North side you can be in ilford in 20 minutes.
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  • ndrundru Posts: 382
    Have you considered the Woolwich free ferry as part of the journey? Bike friendly + no need to queue with the cars to get on and once you're on the North side you can be in ilford in 20 minutes.
    It might be bike friendly and all, but it's slow, and sometimes just one boat operates, which means you have to wait 20 min... Don't get me wrong it's nice when you are in no hurry, but would discourage using it for daily commuting. Although it does take you away from central london.

    Anyway - have you tried a test run? That would give you a good picture of your capabilities/room for improvement and help you decide.
  • Robstar24Robstar24 Posts: 173
    in the immortal words of Alan Partridge, some posters are 'big girls' bras'. I do rickmansworth (metroland/london outskirts for those not familiar with london) to central London 4/5 days a week, 23 miles each way, and it's fine. I also do club runs/racing at weekends.

    If i'm feeling particularly knacked, I might cycle up to Finchley Road and take the Met line to Rickmansworth with my bike and cycle the rest home, at most doing this once a week. The body gets used to the effort asked of it pretty quickly, although I'm not sure about the fitness aspect, I am pretty fit generally but I think fitness plateaus after a while, I probably need to introduce some different exercise to balance out the cycling but I can't stand running etc...

    at first I would arrive at work a little tired, but quickly got used to it. By leaving at 7.10 I'm at work by 8.45, giving me time for a shower and to get changed for 9am. it might mean leaving a bit early, but what else were you going to do with the morning anyway, only a few minutes extra in bed. and i sleep very easily thanks to all the cycling.
  • always_tyredalways_tyred Posts: 4,965
    Robstar24 wrote:
    in the immortal words of Alan Partridge, some posters are 'big girls' bras'. I do rickmansworth (metroland/london outskirts for those not familiar with london) to central London 4/5 days a week, 23 miles each way, and it's fine. I also do club runs/racing at weekends.

    If i'm feeling particularly knacked, I might cycle up to Finchley Road and take the Met line to Rickmansworth with my bike and cycle the rest home, at most doing this once a week. The body gets used to the effort asked of it pretty quickly, although I'm not sure about the fitness aspect, I am pretty fit generally but I think fitness plateaus after a while, I probably need to introduce some different exercise to balance out the cycling but I can't stand running etc...

    at first I would arrive at work a little tired, but quickly got used to it. By leaving at 7.10 I'm at work by 8.45, giving me time for a shower and to get changed for 9am. it might mean leaving a bit early, but what else were you going to do with the morning anyway, only a few minutes extra in bed. and i sleep very easily thanks to all the cycling.
    You are well hard.
  • Robstar24Robstar24 Posts: 173
    Robstar24 wrote:
    in the immortal words of Alan Partridge, some posters are 'big girls' bras'. I do rickmansworth (metroland/london outskirts for those not familiar with london) to central London 4/5 days a week, 23 miles each way, and it's fine. I also do club runs/racing at weekends.

    If i'm feeling particularly knacked, I might cycle up to Finchley Road and take the Met line to Rickmansworth with my bike and cycle the rest home, at most doing this once a week. The body gets used to the effort asked of it pretty quickly, although I'm not sure about the fitness aspect, I am pretty fit generally but I think fitness plateaus after a while, I probably need to introduce some different exercise to balance out the cycling but I can't stand running etc...

    at first I would arrive at work a little tired, but quickly got used to it. By leaving at 7.10 I'm at work by 8.45, giving me time for a shower and to get changed for 9am. it might mean leaving a bit early, but what else were you going to do with the morning anyway, only a few minutes extra in bed. and i sleep very easily thanks to all the cycling.
    You are well hard.

    do i detect sarcasm?
  • always_tyredalways_tyred Posts: 4,965
    Robstar24 wrote:
    do i detect sarcasm?
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  • Rich158Rich158 Posts: 2,348
    Robstar24 wrote:
    Robstar24 wrote:
    in the immortal words of Alan Partridge, some posters are 'big girls' bras'. I do rickmansworth (metroland/london outskirts for those not familiar with london) to central London 4/5 days a week, 23 miles each way, and it's fine. I also do club runs/racing at weekends.

    If i'm feeling particularly knacked, I might cycle up to Finchley Road and take the Met line to Rickmansworth with my bike and cycle the rest home, at most doing this once a week. The body gets used to the effort asked of it pretty quickly, although I'm not sure about the fitness aspect, I am pretty fit generally but I think fitness plateaus after a while, I probably need to introduce some different exercise to balance out the cycling but I can't stand running etc...

    at first I would arrive at work a little tired, but quickly got used to it. By leaving at 7.10 I'm at work by 8.45, giving me time for a shower and to get changed for 9am. it might mean leaving a bit early, but what else were you going to do with the morning anyway, only a few minutes extra in bed. and i sleep very easily thanks to all the cycling.
    You are well hard.

    do i detect sarcasm?

    Just a little :wink: Your routine sounds all to familiar, except I'm in work by 8 most days. Upping the intensity to get some high intensity and sprint sessions is making life interesting at the moment, trying to get to the next plateau is proving to be almost impossible :?
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  • asprillaasprilla Posts: 8,440
    When I first started cycle commuting I was going 25 miles each way, managing 3 or 4 days a week.

    Now, a year later, I only do 17, but I think I could easily manage 25 miles each way 4 days a week. Looking at the stats table I wish I still did.
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  • always_tyredalways_tyred Posts: 4,965
    Asprilla wrote:
    When I first started cycle commuting I was going 25 miles each way, managing 3 or 4 days a week.

    Now, a year later, I only do 17, but I think I could easily manage 25 miles each way 4 days a week. Looking at the stats table I wish I still did.
    It does depend how much climbing you have to do. I used to have a pancake commute, and i'd regularly have to extend it. The flipside was that on those leaden legs days, it was possible to pootle.

    Now my 25-30 mile round trip takes in 500+ metres of climbing, which you can either tackle by pushing hard, or by pushing really hard.
  • biondinobiondino Posts: 5,990
    DDD, have you considered a motorbike/scooter?
  • vorsprungvorsprung Posts: 1,953
    If the traffic isn't too bad should be ok

    I have been doing 15 miles each way for a year now

    To start with I was doing 4 days a week, 5 days left me very tired

    Now the 15 miles has almost no effect, one just gets used to it

    15 takes me an hour this time of year and hour twenty in the winter. But I cross some reasonable hiills (devon/somerset borders)

    You might find the 1h30 commute time is a nuisance sometimes. Usually it's great to be on the bike. But sometimes you have other commitments and it's a pita. Although in the London area, using public transport might well be slower than that!
  • Trev71Trev71 Posts: 46
    A guy I work with does 21 miles each way, three times a week on his Kona Jake. He's in his early fifties, but uber fit.
  • BassjunkieukBassjunkieuk Posts: 4,232
    I was thinking of asking a similar high-mileage question myself so this thread has been rather useful :-)

    Mine wouldn't have been on a permanent basis due to the nature of my job but a new site that has come up that I'd potentially need to cover in Staines!
    By my best reckoning and that of cyclestreets.net it's about 20-22 miles each way and takes in same rather scary looking A-Roads :-D
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  • ex-pat scotex-pat scot Posts: 939
    I do 40 -45 miles each day. Depends on how much of a scenic route home I take...

    With a long 1-in-6 hill near home to mix it up.

    Trick is
    1. planning. keep plenty of kit at work. Spare clothes etc. Spare bike bits (cables, spanners, allen keys, pump, batteries, tubes). Heavy duty lock.
    2. ruthlessly minimise carried weight. See 1.
    3. work up to the volume. Week 1 do Tues & Thurs. Week 2 do M,W,F. Week 3 do M,T,Thur,Fr. Week 4 gives you MTWThF.
    4. don't be afraid to have the odd day off
    5. experiment with routes. Keeps you fresh and allows for traffic probs
    6. talk to other riders and try and ride with others for at least some of the route, if you can.
    7. porridge is your friend
    8. as is WD40
    9. find a good reliable cheap bike shop. You'll need them
    10. bike should be as fast and light as reasonably practicable. Drops. 700 x 23 or x25 max. 'Guards in bad weather. Fixed / SS is simple, reliable, cheap to run and buy.
    11. have several bikes. You ought to have at least 1 spare "commute" bike at the very least
    12. learn how to maintain your bikes properly. Pay particular attention to brakes and wheel bearings
    13. tot up your miles. Great for motivation
    14. tot up your cost savings. Great for motivation too (and for justifying bike bits purchase)
    15. eat like a horse...
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