chain broke following service: should I complain?

Rob4
Rob4 Posts: 75
edited May 2010 in Road beginners
My chain snapped three days after I'd had the bike (tri cross) serviced by my local shop. the service cost £30.
the chain snapped as I was pushing down, getting going again after a red light.
should I complain to the shop or is it difficult to say when a chain's about to go?

Comments

  • Percy Vera
    Percy Vera Posts: 1,103
    You can tell when a chain is worn, so if this is the cause it should have been picked up if included in the service.

    Unless it is a faulty chain?
    Or was put back together incorrectly?

    Where did it break and what actually broke?
  • Rob4
    Rob4 Posts: 75
    cheers. one of the link's just came apart, sort of bent, and the pin fell out, it had been the chain put on there when the bike was new, about a yr previously.
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    Do they break the chain for servicing ? I doubt it. I think its just one of those things. You need a chain tool anyway - so just fix it yourself.
  • rake
    rake Posts: 3,204
    home maintenance can be invaluable. :wink:
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,891
    imho it is hard to see how it can't be down to the shop - if it was dangerously worn then a service ought to catch it, and if they broke it to service and didn't rejoin it correctly it's also their fault

    once the pin comes out of one plate, all the force goes off-centre, bends the other plate, and the chain snaps

    get a kmc missing link to replace the damaged link (if the chain is worn then the cassette will be worn to match, so putting on a new chain might mean changing the cassette too)
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • Pokerface
    Pokerface Posts: 7,960
    Rob4 wrote:
    cheers. one of the link's just came apart, sort of bent, and the pin fell out, it had been the chain put on there when the bike was new, about a yr previously.

    If the chain was a year old - I'm surprised it lasted that long - unless you don't ride a lot of miles.

    It was time for anew chain anyway I would say.

    £30 for a service isn't very much and to be honest I wouldn't expect a mechanic to check chain wear at that price. If it was a good bike show and someone you know, then maybe they would check it. But if you hadn't had any noticeable problems with it - I could see them overlooking it.
  • Pokerface
    Pokerface Posts: 7,960
    sungod wrote:
    Get a kmc missing link to replace the damaged link (if the chain is worn then the cassette will be worn to match, so putting on a new chain might mean changing the cassette too)


    In my experience this isn't strictly true. It MIGHT damage the cassette - but I have never had this problem. I change chains 2 or three times a year, do loads of miles, but rarely change cassettes and haven't had any problems.


    However - if I put on a new cassette - I put on a new chain to match it.
  • Thick Tester
    Thick Tester Posts: 380
    You have your own mind and can decide from the following options.

    1) Go into the shop and complain and be the butt of all the staff jokes and still remembered at the shops xmas do.
    2) Use you brain and check it for wear and if its ok bang an extra powerlink in... OR
    3) If its knackered Man up and buy a new chain.

    Life is full of difficult choices.......
  • ian_s
    ian_s Posts: 183
    If you are otherwise happy with the shop and their approach, why not just go and discuss it with them (rather than rant which is unlikely to result in anything constructive)? Most likely you'll have to buy a new chain/missing link anyway but if they are decent outfit they will fit it for you for free.
  • softlad
    softlad Posts: 3,513
    if the drive train is worn, then it is odd that this wasn't picked up by the service, no matter how much it cost.

    But, the fact that the chain broke is not as a direct result of any work the shop carried out, by the sound of it, so you can't really blame the shop for it.

    Like Ian S says - have a chat with them..
  • Ollieda
    Ollieda Posts: 1,010
    Or just complain to wiggle, ask Speed_King for advice.

    Joking aside, check with your LBS what exactly was included with the service and also check the chain. If it is badly worn and the service included checking that then you would have grounds to complain. If not then it's not really their problem, especially if the service didn't include it and say the next level of serivce up did - you get what you pay for. A good LBS might have mentioned it too you if they had noticed bad chain wear but it wasn't included in the service, and they might then have offered it to you, but if you haven't paid for it then there's no reason compleling them to inform you...other than protecting a reputation.

    If it is just one bad link and the rest of the chain is ok then they might just quickly sort it for you, if not then buying a new chain is probably the best route. As ian_s said, go in and talk to the LBS, don't go in ranting as it won't get you as far!
  • furrag
    furrag Posts: 481
    Or just complain to wiggle, ask Speed_King for advice.
    :lol:
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,891
    Pokerface wrote:
    sungod wrote:
    Get a kmc missing link to replace the damaged link (if the chain is worn then the cassette will be worn to match, so putting on a new chain might mean changing the cassette too)


    In my experience this isn't strictly true. It MIGHT damage the cassette - but I have never had this problem. I change chains 2 or three times a year, do loads of miles, but rarely change cassettes and haven't had any problems.


    However - if I put on a new cassette - I put on a new chain to match it.

    wasn't talking about cassette damage, simply that if the old chain has worn enough then the cassette will have become worn as well, so a new chain will tend to skip under load if used with the old cassette
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • Pokerface
    Pokerface Posts: 7,960
    sungod wrote:
    Pokerface wrote:
    sungod wrote:
    Get a kmc missing link to replace the damaged link (if the chain is worn then the cassette will be worn to match, so putting on a new chain might mean changing the cassette too)


    In my experience this isn't strictly true. It MIGHT damage the cassette - but I have never had this problem. I change chains 2 or three times a year, do loads of miles, but rarely change cassettes and haven't had any problems.


    However - if I put on a new cassette - I put on a new chain to match it.

    wasn't talking about cassette damage, simply that if the old chain has worn enough then the cassette will have become worn as well, so a new chain will tend to skip under load if used with the old cassette

    Yup - I know what you meant - and still stand by what I said. (Not having a go - just telling my personal experience). Chains and cassettes can wear at different rates. So I haven't had to replace my cassettes at the same time as my chains (even though the cassette will have been worn down some). But hey - a good clue is...if you put a new chain on and it slips, replace the cassette too! (More or less what you were saying)