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using air shocks

mickusmickus Posts: 199
edited May 2010 in MTB general
need to pick some brains...

I've just bought a felt compulsion (can't wait to get out on it properly!). This is my first air shock bike. Now, what I don't want to do is just go out not really knowing how it should be set up and do something silly to damage it...

So my question is - where do I start with pressure in the rear shock and forks? I'm a little shy of 13 stone (81 Kg).

I know I need to play around with it to get it right for me, but would really appreciate some experienced peeps giving me some pointers to help setting it up go smoothly. How should I set the damping for setting them up? Am I likely to be changing the pressure in them regularly to suit the trail I'm riding?

All info along those lines would be great.

Thanks

Posts

  • cavegiantcavegiant Posts: 1,546
    Forks tend to be low pressure 0-50 , shocks high pressure 200-300

    top tip,

    get a manual and read it, then ask google....

    Then if you don't understand ask here.
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?
  • cgarossicgarossi Posts: 729
    General advice is to set for 25% sag.

    That is, when sat on the bike, your front and rear shock should be compressed to around 25% of total compression. This a general value and quite a few folks decide to adjust to their riding style, but its a start.

    For rebound, set to a setting in the middle and adjust for comfort. You may want to change according to the terrain. Large rocks and bumps = slower rebound, small bumps = faster rebound.
  • peter413peter413 Posts: 5,120
    cavegiant wrote:
    Forks tend to be low pressure 0-50 , shocks high pressure 200-300

    top tip,

    get a manual and read it, then ask google....

    Then if you don't understand ask here.

    Sorry, Forks tend to be around 50-120 psi and rear shocks tend to be around 150-250psi.

    Of course some people put them beyond this to effectively lock them out but you should always stay within the manufacturers recommended guidelines, they are there for a reason :wink:
  • mickusmickus Posts: 199
    thanks cgarossi, that's a great place for me to start.

    yeah, wasn't planning on running my forks at 0psi :P I get what you're saying though cavegiant, thanks. and thanks for clearing up peter, just incase I was a complete tool :P

    Any other advice on air shocks is more than welcome, I'm a noob as far as they are concerned!
  • cavegiantcavegiant Posts: 1,546
    Thanks for contradicting me for no reason, especially with useless info that is no improvement.
    =-)
    Why would I care about 150g of bike weight, I just ate 400g of cookies while reading this?
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 50,675 Lives Here
    peter413 wrote:
    cavegiant wrote:
    Forks tend to be low pressure 0-50 , shocks high pressure 200-300

    top tip,

    get a manual and read it, then ask google....

    Then if you don't understand ask here.

    Sorry, Forks tend to be around 50-120 psi and rear shocks tend to be around 150-250psi.

    Of course some people put them beyond this to effectively lock them out but you should always stay within the manufacturers recommended guidelines, they are there for a reason :wink:

    sorry it all depends on what the fork is and the shock is.

    OP when it arrives download and read the manuals for the parts or ask on here first.

    many forks and shocks have more than one air chamber and the settings can be X or Y or a variable. BUT where they have to be a given value or between a range damage can occur if they are not followed.

    If you dont have a suitable pump get one..

    So what is the Fork and What is the shock?
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 50,675 Lives Here
    PS topic locked.OP start it again in Tech with better info.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
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