Road Performance on Hybrid - Should I fit slicks??

paulsjdale
paulsjdale Posts: 5
edited May 2010 in Road beginners
I have a Scott Sportster P4 2008 version, with the following spec;

http://www.evanscycles.com/products/sco ... e-ec001316

The tyres are 700c and are knobbly. I was out cycling at the weekend (all on road) and swapped bikes part way with a friends Kona Hybrid. The effort required for the Kona seemed significantly less.... would this be due to the fact it has slicks?

I am shortly going on a c.120 mile road cycle trip over a couple of days, which will be fairly hilly. Would I be well advised to buy some slick / semi slick tyres?

If so, any advice as to which I should buy? I am purely concerned with the on road performance, and will not be going off road.

Many thanks in advance!!

Comments

  • spaniamania
    spaniamania Posts: 80
    Fit a slick?
    Only if it is lighter than what you already have
  • brin
    brin Posts: 1,122
    Not necessary to fit slicks, but would definitely change the nobbly tyres for your road ride, conti gators or spesh armadillos should do the job, go for a smaller width size to what you are using too,maybe 25's?
  • brin
    brin Posts: 1,122
    just read spec of your bike, 25's might be to big a drop, maybe 27's would be better? your LBS should advise
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,885
    edited May 2010
    knobbly tyres will waste energy and squirm/lose grip on tarmac, especially if you try to corner at speed

    slicks will be more efficient and give far better grip

    what you can fit depends on how wide the rims are

    have a look at these, try the 28mm, but they're available in other widths, the price includes the tube...

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Conti ... 360008375/
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • skyd0g
    skyd0g Posts: 2,540
    If they're the original tyres that were supplied with the bike - Conti Double fighter 2 700x37C - they're pretty heavy (650g) but very robust. Fine for general commuting and light off-road (canal paths etc), but not designed for speed.

    For a faster, lighter tyre you could try the Michelin Krylion Carbon 25mm - still pretty robust, but alot lighter and will roll better. (You may need some new tubes also)
    Cycling weakly
  • daviesee
    daviesee Posts: 6,386
    Another thing to consider is tyre pressure.

    A low pressure tyre will absorb energy which you could do with being transmitted directly into motion. I would look for tyres around 80+ psi.
    None of the above should be taken seriously, and certainly not personally.
  • Lycra Man
    Lycra Man Posts: 141
    I agree with SunGod. I fitted Conti SportContact 28c, and used them for 2 years on my hybrid, for Audax rides up to 300k.

    They are lighter and roll MUCH easier than knobblies.

    Definitely fit a smooth road tyre for riding on the road.

    Lycra Man
    FCN7 - 1 for SPDs = FCN6
  • paulsjdale
    paulsjdale Posts: 5
    Lycra Man wrote:
    I agree with SunGod. I fitted Conti SportContact 28c, and used them for 2 years on my hybrid, for Audax rides up to 300k.

    They are lighter and roll MUCH easier than knobblies.

    Definitely fit a smooth road tyre for riding on the road.

    Lycra Man

    Thanks for all the help. My current tyres are 700x37... would 700x28 be too much of a drop?

    Would there be any benefit going for a 32 or 37?
  • skyd0g
    skyd0g Posts: 2,540
    700c X 28 would be fine.
    32's or 37's would give a slightly comfier ride at the cost of weight and would be slower than 28's.
    Cycling weakly
  • AidanR
    AidanR Posts: 1,142
    OK, you want speedier tyres. There are 3 factors affecting this:

    Weight
    Rolling resistance
    Aerodynamics

    And then other factors:

    Comfort
    Durability
    Puncture resistance
    Grip
    Price

    If you're just on roads, slick tyres will roll and grip better. Wider tyres will be less aerodynamic (not really a factor on a hybrid anyway) and will be heavier than narrow tyres. However, their rolling resistance is lower than narrow tyres for a given pressure*, and you can run them at lower pressures than narrow tyres without risking pinch punctures (though there's obviously a trade-off with rolling resistance).

    Rolling resistance and puncture protection is another trade-off, as well protected tyres are less supple. Weight and puncture protection is another trade-off. Grippier tyres are generally less durable. Cheap tyres often have a wire bead as opposed to a kevlar one (folding tyres) and this makes them heavier.

    So it depends what you're looking for. Personally I'd stay with the same width tyres, or slightly narrower. I'm a fan of Schwalbe Marathon Supremes as a good trade-off of all the above, but they are a bit pricey.

    *http://www.schwalbetires.com/tech_info/rolling_resistance
    Bike lover and part-time cyclist.
  • cpk
    cpk Posts: 2
    I have a similar question.

    I've got a Kona smoke with Duro Beach Bum Tyres

    http://durotire.com/productdetails.php?productid=659

    26 x 2.125

    Would it significantly increase my efficiency and speed if I went for a thinner city tyre like the continental? I am planning on doing a short cycling holiday too.

    Thanks in advance
  • AidanR
    AidanR Posts: 1,142
    If your rims are designed to take a tyre as wide as that, I wouldn't go much below 1.8" wide... possibly 1.5". Something like this would be about right: http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... elID=35796

    Given your current tyres weigh a massive 1.2kg each, this alone should give you a good efficiency saving. I imagine the rolling resistance will be much improved too.
    Bike lover and part-time cyclist.
  • cpk
    cpk Posts: 2
    Thanks for the reply

    It seems my wheels are 26 x 1.5. Could anyone advise which size continental to get, is the 1.5" possible?

    Cheers
  • npowell28
    npowell28 Posts: 204
    I fitted 700 x 23 continental sports to my GT Transeo Hybrid. It made a world of difference to be. Knocked a good 10 minutes off my 11 mile commute to work. I've had no problems with the rim width etc etc.

    It does make the ride a bit harsh though with the aluminium frame.
    Cube Ltd Pro!

    Bianchi C2C via Nirone
  • bsc8180
    bsc8180 Posts: 17
    cpk wrote:
    Thanks for the reply

    It seems my wheels are 26 x 1.5. Could anyone advise which size continental to get, is the 1.5" possible?

    Cheers

    Yes, narrower is better though.... , i run these

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Conti ... 360021704/

    on my 26" mtb rims. They made a huge difference on my commute of 7 miles each way (now down to ~23 mins each way from 35 on knobbilies)
    I didnt change the inner tube either.

    Cheers
  • balthazar
    balthazar Posts: 1,565
    cpk wrote:
    Thanks for the reply

    It seems my wheels are 26 x 1.5. Could anyone advise which size continental to get, is the 1.5" possible?

    Cheers
    How about Conti Grand Prix in 26x1 1/8:

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Conti ... 360041128/

    or Vittoria Rubino in 26x1.5":

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Vitto ... 360035181/

    Both are decent light slick road tyres, which will fit on ordinary MTB rims.