Do I need to change my inner tubes?!

Bobbinogs
Bobbinogs Posts: 4,841
edited March 2010 in Road beginners
Good morning Stanley222, most tubes are sized such that they can be used on a range of tyres. The ones I use are marked 700x20/28C so they can be used on tyres from 20-28. Going up 2mm is no big change and I am not aware of any tubes that wouldn't work in your case. It might be worth just checking the tube when you get the tyre off if you want to be 100% sure.

I cannot think of any other reason why you would want to change the tube (perhaps someone else can cover this?). If the bike was old then I would change the tube just for the hell of it whilst I had the tyre off because rubber does perish, but this doesn't seem to apply in your case ("new bike"). Tomorrow looks like being a nice day for a ride with the new tyres :)

Comments

  • Hi,
    I second the opinion of Bobbinogs. Many innertubes have a range of 18-25, so most likely it will fit. The worst that can happen is that the tube will be a little over stretched when pumped up, leading - I guess- to a slightly higher chance of a puncture.
    I would go with the inner tubes that you have, providing that they haven't perished and just make sure I have a couple of the absolutely correct size tubes at home as a backup.
  • skyd0g
    skyd0g Posts: 2,540
    Hi,
    I second the opinion of Bobbinogs. Many innertubes have a range of 18-25, so most likely it will fit. The worst that can happen is that the tube will be a little over stretched when pumped up, leading - I guess- to a slightly higher chance of a puncture.
    I would go with the inner tubes that you have, providing that they haven't perished and just make sure I have a couple of the absolutely correct size tubes at home as a backup.

    I'd have them in my back pocket if I was out on a ride, rather than at home. :wink:
    Cycling weakly
  • Stone Glider
    Stone Glider Posts: 1,227
    Wot they said but why change the front tyre? The rear wheel carries most of your weight so the comfort benefit of extra air will be felt most there. The front wheel will be, fractionally, more earo and you save throwing away two brand new tyres. :)

    I may be wrong, this is Road Beginners after all.
    The older I get the faster I was
  • Stone Glider
    Stone Glider Posts: 1,227
    No, I understood the question; my point was why chenge the front tyre. As I posted, the point I was trying to make was that you could leave the front wheel alone and just change the rear. This would save you buying two new tyres (just the one) and leave you with a spare 23mm tyre for your front wheel at some time in the future.

    The Ladybird Book of Bicycle Management is being published anytime soon :?
    The older I get the faster I was
  • the tube I just bought was a 18-23 / 700 so might be a good idea to check the tube and / or get a new one that you are certain fits.

    its a fiver worst ways for peace of mind
    exercise.png
  • blorg
    blorg Posts: 1,169
    You get better grip and cornering with a wider front tyre so it can be a valid option. Generally though I would agree and go the other way if not changing both. Wider/grippier front more a MTB thing.

    You can use your existing tubes in the 700x25c even if they are 18-23, the extra 2mm won't make any difference.