Tyres- Apparently not all are created equally.

jordan_217
jordan_217 Posts: 2,580
edited March 2010 in Workshop
Hi,

I've fitted some Conti GP4000S to my American Classic 420 race wheels. The tyres were an absolute nightmare to get on the rims, despite leaving them in the house to warm up overnight.

After about 10-15 minutes of fighting, lots of cursing and some cuts I got them on. I've taken them off and refitted them since, which was slightly easier but was still a struggle. In a race this will be a nightmare.

Any tips making this process easier or shall I look at other tyres which will be more forgiving?

Cheers
“Training is like fighting with a gorilla. You don’t stop when you’re tired. You stop when the gorilla is tired.”

Comments

  • dennisn
    dennisn Posts: 10,601
    jordan_217 wrote:
    Hi,

    I've fitted some Conti GP4000S to my American Classic 420 race wheels. The tyres were an absolute nightmare to get on the rims, despite leaving them in the house to warm up overnight.

    After about 10-15 minutes of fighting, lots of cursing and some cuts I got them on. I've taken them off and refitted them since, which was slightly easier but was still a struggle. In a race this will be a nightmare.

    Any tips making this process easier or shall I look at other tyres which will be more forgiving?

    Cheers

    Usually in a RACE you don't change tires, you change wheels and this only really happens in Crits. In races over longer courses, flat tires simply knock you out of the running. You put in a new tube and continue on, but you're OUT, so to speak. This is assuming you're an amateur racer in club and or local / regional races. If you're on the pro tour you simply flag down the wheel car. This luxury doesn't often occur for the average racer however.
  • MRadd
    MRadd Posts: 205
    Different tyres... Different wheels... Always cause problems.

    I have a set of Fulrcum 7's for training on... With Maxxis Detonator tyres. The fit is really tight on these and much cursing has to happen for me to get them fitted right! (even more of a bugger if I don't quite get the name lined up with the fulcrum words on the wheel...)

    My "hilly" wheels are Kore Streamlines. Again, maxxis detornator tyres.. I can fit these with my fingers. No tyre levers needed. No cursing.

    "Race" wheels are Mavic. Conti Attack and Force pairing of tyres.. Easier to fit than onto the fulcrums, but needing tyre levers.

    All tyres will be different, as will all wheels. WIth regards racing and puncturing... Good old fast air from Hutchinson works a treat! Gets you inflated and back in no time. If its Crit racing you're doing, surely they allow for "Taking a lap out" when puncturing or mechanicals? They do at Hillingdon.
    : "Why don't i remember breaking my face?" :

    : Semi Professional Grease Monkey, Full time Tea boy... :
  • Wamas
    Wamas Posts: 256
    Talcum powder in the tyres and rubbed over the tube makes fitting and removal much eaiser as it cuts down the friction.

    I fitted two Vredestein Fortezza quattro tricomps last night which were much harder than the Conti 4000S I fitted last year, but with talc and a lot of finger force I managed to get them on my Pro-lite rims. (I have no problems with Maxxis detonators on these, and can remove and fit without tyre levers just going to show all tyres are different).

    As with all tyres, the more use they receive, the easier they are to get on and off. The Conti are made of fairly soft rubber, so you wil notice that fitting them gets easier with use.
  • paul64
    paul64 Posts: 278
    I thought rims were the culprits most of the time?

    Allegedly there is an increasing trend for rims to be made tighter than they used to be. Mechanics on here would know best. It's certainly a shock coming back to punctures and tyre replacement after a few years of absence and seems to be a case of sleeves rolled up and getting tyres used to going on and off a rim.

    We probably need a day assisting in a workshop and would then take it in our stride.

    If you think road wheels are bad try the fun of an orange Conti turbo trainer tyre (on old Mavic CXP30 wheels in my case). It can't get any worse. Yes it can, red Vittoria turbo trainer tyre on my Easton EA50SL for the winter! I felt like Kwai Chang Caine lifting the old flower pot after these two experiences.
  • balthazar
    balthazar Posts: 1,565
    paul64 wrote:
    I thought rims were the culprits most of the time?

    Allegedly there is an increasing trend for rims to be made tighter than they used to be. Mechanics on here would know best. It's certainly a shock coming back to punctures and tyre replacement after a few years of absence and seems to be a case of sleeves rolled up and getting tyres used to going on and off a rim.

    We probably need a day assisting in a workshop and would then take it in our stride.
    Maybe. When I worked in a shop fifteen years ago, the tyre levers rarely moved from their drawer: I never used them, for countless tyre fittings, and I don't recall anybody else using them either, though I suppose there must have been some cases of extreme difficulty. We always used our hands, everybody mucking in at quiet periods to fix punctures.

    I mostly only fit tyres on my own bike now so it doesn't happen very often, but I can't recall difficulty with any of those, and I've used most brands over the years. From the countless cries of help on here, I wonder if it is mainly a problem with technique, simply because I've never met a tyre/rim combination which caused much trouble (and I'm no hulk). Or wheels have got bigger, or something (I have Mavic Open Pro rims).
  • plowmar
    plowmar Posts: 1,032
    I just do not seem to have the strength to lever tyres on without levers, am I doing it wrong or is a fair amount of strength needed.

    The times I have tried it sans levers I worry that I will damage the wheel.
  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Like Balthazar, with my current fleet of bikes, I've got a fair selection of rims and tyre combinations and rarely experience problems that require levering. Working as a mechanic years ago there is a pride not to use levers - it is down to technique: Talc the inside of the tyre to reduce the friction, use a thin, flexible rim, tape, pinch the tyre around the rim and push the slack towards the final free section.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • Ive got some mavic rims from 1987 and i've just put conti gp 4000's on them, i had to use a screw driver as plastic levers snapped, metal levers wouldnt fit..
    I think the rims may expanded through the years... Insanely tight!.. I used to have fulcrum 7's with the same tyres but these are in another league...
  • Velonutter
    Velonutter Posts: 2,437
    Yep fitting my Conti turbo tyre to my old Euros took two of us, much easier on my fulcrum 7 wheels on the turbo.

    Small trick hang your tyre over the radiators for a while and they should then just slip over.