Is my LBS right? (Picture attached)

flyer
flyer Posts: 608
edited March 2010 in Road beginners
I asked mt LBS to check the chain today?

He said its worn and ready for replacement, however I would also need a new cassette!

Is this normal? He asked if it was skipping and I said no, so he said I may as well keep going until it skips then change both!

It was the young lad in the shop who said this, I dont think he's trying to rip me off, I am just unsure if he's correct.

He said a chain and cassette should last about 1000 -1500 on a road bike?

Dura Ace chain & cassette £142 and ultegra £104

I have Dura Ace at moment but he says unless you are competing Ultegra is fine.

Any advise appreciated

Flyer
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Comments

  • Heckler1974
    Heckler1974 Posts: 479
    edited March 2010
    Depends how worn the chain is and how long you ran on a worn chain as to whether you need a new cassette. Put a new chain on, if it skips replace the cassette, if not don't. As to dura ace or Ultegra, which can you afford? There won't be a huge amount of difference (apart from weight) but it'll just be wrong and offend the asthetic cycling gods to have all dura ace and an ultegra cassette,

    Most people on here tend to replace chains regularly (buy a chain checker for about a tenner and replace when worn) and get at least three chains to every cassette.
  • What mileage is your current chain on now? What sort of maintenance do you do with the chain?
  • dennisn
    dennisn Posts: 10,601
    FWIW I have NEVER bought a new cassette simply because I bought a new chain. I buy new cassettes when they wear out, as I do with chains. Aluminum cassettes wear quicker than steel ones. So that's something to think about, but I have always changed
    only what was worn out.
  • giant_man
    giant_man Posts: 6,878
    people usually change the cassette at the same time as their chain depending on what the condition of both are like of course. I certainly do, anyway.

    But if you look after your chain and get long life out of it this needn't be too often.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    I'd just fit a new chain and see what happens. If it doesn't skip then you can get a few more thousands of mile out of your cassette.

    If it does skip, you have 2 options:
    1) put the old one back on and do as he says, ie keep going and replace when it stops working. By this time you'll need chain, cassette and possibly a chainring or two (£££)

    2) fit a new cassette to go with the new chain. Buy a chain wear checker and replace the chain at 1% wear. You should get through 3 or more chains before you need to replace the cassette. (££)

    I have 105 so can't really comment on the Ultegra / Dura Ace thing. I just buy the cheapest 10 speed chain I can find on the web when I need a new one.
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    +1 with Dennis. I change the chain fairly reguilarly and then theres no need to change the block. Its only when the chain is really worn and you carry on riding that it really starts to wear the block.
  • AidanR
    AidanR Posts: 1,142
    http://sheldonbrown.com/chains.html

    Everything you need to know. Scroll down to the bottom for chain and sprocket wear.
    Bike lover and part-time cyclist.
  • balthazar
    balthazar Posts: 1,565
    A worn chain (worn beyond half percent) wears sprockets out increasingly rapidly. Because cassettes are expensive, it isn't cost-effective to let your chain wear to the extent that it accelerates sprocket wear. However, if that's happened, and your cassette needs replacing anyway, then the young man's dead right—you may as well wear them both out together.

    The reverse isn't true: worn sprockets don't accelerate chain wear. Because of this, you can fit a new chain to old sprockets, and as long as it runs without skipping under load, no extra damage is being done. This asymmetry confuses some people. So:

    New chain + old sprockets = good
    Old chain + new sprockets = bad (sprocket-wrecking)
  • flyer
    flyer Posts: 608
    Hi
    Its done about 1400 miles mostly on the flat

    Cheers for all the info

    Ian
  • redddraggon
    redddraggon Posts: 10,862
    1400 miles should mean fcuk all wear, even with the Ti sprockets on a DA cassette..

    "Chain wear measuring tools" are inaccurate.

    I doubt it's worn much at all.
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  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    I'd not go back to that LBS any more. I wouldnt trust them - or at least that assistant.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Well I've been using a basic park tools chain wear checker on 3 bikes and believe it to be pretty accurate.

    10 yr old mtb on the original Shimano IG chain; so worn the thing made no contact at all with the roller at one end. Replaced it with a new SRAM chain, and reassuringly the tool says it's OK (didn't replace the cassette; that went when the wheels were nicked)

    5 yr old mtb, similar result. New chain skipped so had to replace cassette too.

    My road bike I have been checking since it was new. 18 months on the 105 chain is finally showing 0.75% wear. It has been ridden through 2 winters, so I don't think it owes me anything. I have a replacement marinating in motor oil which I'll fit when the 1% mark is reached. I don't think a chain every 2 years and a cassette every 5 is too bad.
  • plowmar
    plowmar Posts: 1,032
    I run a 105 and apart from worn teeth on the chainring no apparent terminal damage on cassette or chain after 5000 + miles.

    So 1000 - 1500 miles is very low value to my pocket.
  • markos1963
    markos1963 Posts: 3,724
    plowmar wrote:
    I run a 105 and apart from worn teeth on the chainring no apparent terminal damage on cassette or chain after 5000 + miles.

    So 1000 - 1500 miles is very low value to my pocket.

    Have to agree, I have 105 and I got over 3000miles out of the chain and only changed it because of some big rides coming up and even then it was for a £15 KMC one. New chain worked fine with no skipping. Doubt I would go for Dura Ace now if you only get 1500 miles out of a £100 cassette :shock: Thats nearly 4 cassettes and chains per year for me. I could run a motorbike for that!
  • rake
    rake Posts: 3,204
    its alright swapping chains but letting it run to the end after a couple must be cheapest.too many chains will cost more than a block and chain. a 105 block isnt that much.
  • Moontrane
    Moontrane Posts: 233
    Shimano ultegra 10sp cassette and chain user, here. I’ll go through about 4-5 chains per cassette. Cassettes lasts about 17,000 miles with my use. 6,000+ miles with 260,000+ feet of climbing last year, for reference. Lube it or lose it.
    Infinite diversity, infinte variations
  • nmcgann
    nmcgann Posts: 1,780
    flyer wrote:
    Hi
    Its done about 1400 miles mostly on the flat

    Cheers for all the info

    Ian

    That's not that far to wear a chain out - how worn is it?

    The thing to do is to measure 12 links (pin-to-pin) with a ruler and see how long it is. A brand new chain will be 12" exactly. The length increases as the chain wears - if it is around 12-1/16" then it's time for a new chain and the sprockets will most likely be just fine. If it is around 12-1/8" then the sprockets are probably shot and a new chain will skip.

    On my good bike I use ultegra casettes (£45-ish) and 105 chains (£15-ish) and bin the chains before the 12-1/16 point. This gets at least 3 chains per casette replacement.
    --
    "Because the cycling is pain. The cycling is soul crushing pain."
  • juankerr
    juankerr Posts: 1,099
    On the MTB forums, changing chain and cassette at the same time is standard advice, so maybe the young lad is influenced by this - maybe riding in muck grinds the cassette down quicker?.
    I'd say, change the chain, and if it skips, which I very much doubt given your mileage, change the cassette (or put the old chain back on and ride it till it breaks/skips)
  • Mike400
    Mike400 Posts: 226
    commuting in all weathers = need to replace cassette and chain at same time

    I keep my drivetrain very clean, especially in winter when I clean / re-oil every day but it makes little difference - part of my route runs along the coast, a really bad day sees the lovely clean drivetrain clogged with grit, sand etc etc etc

    I manage 1500 miles from a cassette / chain combo in the worst half of the year (doing 100 miles a week commuting)

    So what I think im trying to say is there is no "standard" wear - it all depends on where, when and how you ride.

    My dad only rides his bike in good weather, as a "leisure" cyclist, and he has the same chain and cassette that was on the bike from new. The bike is near 30 years old!

    wheras after one day in the height of winter my commuter has a gunked up gritty nasty chain which if left, will grind the hell out of the drivetrain.

    My advice is if it is still running fine, just keep riding.
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  • Bunneh
    Bunneh Posts: 1,329
    Back in my MTB days I usually had to replace a chain and cassette together due to the wear from dirt etc; hasn't be the same with the road bike. The cassette is still in very good condition, even after being ridden into the ground.

    I went to my local bike shop and spoke to him about a new chain, and he gave me the 'you need a new cassette, chain and chainset which is around £200'. I said I'd leave it because his shop is notoriously expensive and he obviously doesn't like me anyway :D Quick check on eBay found a set of the above for around £100, new.
  • wpdoolan
    wpdoolan Posts: 185
    highly unlikely you need a new chainset

    you may get away with just a new chain depending on wear
    to rear cogs
    try new chain and if it is jumping you know you need a new cassette if not you
    are good for another while
  • Pokerface
    Pokerface Posts: 7,960
    I've had an LBS tell me a brand new chain was already worn out - after just 2 rides! So I wouldn't trust chain wear tools all the time.

    Keep your chain clean and oiled and it should easily last 1000's of miles - not just 1500.
  • John.T
    John.T Posts: 3,698
    Don't trust chain tools. Just use a ruler. Lean on the pedal to tension the chain. Measure 10 full links. It should be 10". When it measures 10.1" the chain is goosed.
  • Flasheart
    Flasheart Posts: 1,278
    Bunneh, you stalking me?
    Given up on the goats? :twisted:



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  • flyer
    flyer Posts: 608
    edited March 2010
    Not sure if it helps but here is a close up shot of the block!

    I use lube all the time and only use bike in the dry

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/hu17/4408452613/


    Cheers

    Flyer
  • redddraggon
    redddraggon Posts: 10,862
    flyer wrote:
    Not sure if it helps but here is a close up shot of the block!

    I use lube all the time and only use bike in the dry

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/upload/done/


    Cheers

    Flyer

    That's the Flickr upload page
    I like bikes...

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  • flyer
    flyer Posts: 608
    Oop's sorry now sorted

    Also found out that the block is a SRAM OG1070 11-28 and not a Dura Ace!!!

    Flyer
  • sturmey
    sturmey Posts: 964
    Cassettes wear out eventually but if you are meticulous about cleaning your transmission- i clean mine after virtually every ride- I reckon a cassette should last over 10,000 miles. I have one that's done 3000 and it's like new.
  • John.T
    John.T Posts: 3,698
    That cassette looks fine to me. Measure the chain as I said earlier. Make sure you have tension in the chain and measure from pin centre to pin centre. If 10 links measure less than 10.075" (or 10 1/16" if that is easier) then that is OK too. You should be getting much more than 1500 miles from a chain. I reckon on getting 3000 winter or at least 6000 summer miles. The one on my green Trek must have done nearer 10000 now but still passes.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    sturmey wrote:
    Cassettes wear out eventually but if you are meticulous about cleaning your transmission- i clean mine after virtually every ride- I reckon a cassette should last over 10,000 miles. I have one that's done 3000 and it's like new.
    +1
    keep it clean and lube it, my chain and cassette (Ultegra) are 3 years and 100's of miles old and are fine. :wink: