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20stone...am i too fat for a road bike?

BigSte27BigSte27 Posts: 25
edited February 2010 in Road beginners
Long story short, im 20stone and 6ft 5". Lost 12stone or so in just over a year (bought myself an exercise bike, then after losing 5 stone treated myself to a Kona Hoss MTB 8 months ago) Im down to approx 20stone now, i stuck slicks on my MTB and have been commuting to work for the last 7months, 32miles a day usually (16mph average), 3times a week minimum.

So i've now come to the conclusion i enjoy riding on the road and that my behemouth of an MTB isnt the most efficient machine. So im thinking about getting a road bike but my concerns are obviously my weight and generally durability, 20stone of rider doing 100miles a week minimum etc. I love getting up, out the saddle and powering through the pedals! Ive replaced a couple of bottom brackets on my MTB but everything has pretty much held up well.

Im looking at spending no more than £800, ive been looking over at www.pedalon.co.uk at some of the bikes, but i don't know if im wasting my time with my budget/weight.

Any advice appreciated, cheers eveyrone :wink:

Posts

  • Take a look at something like a Kona Dew Drop. It has drop handlebars, disc brakes, and wide tyres (about 38mm). Check whether it has mudguard eyelets on the frame and forks so that you can fit full mudguards.

    If you were to get rim brakes and high pressure tyres, the tyres might explode stopping 20 stone down a very steep and long hill. This is because the rims will get very hot, which will heat up the air in the tyre, causing the air pressure to increase and exploding the tyre and possibly the rim too!
  • Tyres exploding, wheels exploding !!!! Bit dramatic that !!
    I am 6' 3 and 17.5 stone, I have a little excess round my middle but muscle elsewhere.
    I have been commuting on my Trek 1.2 which is a basic model for 2 years now with only a broken spoke, no punctures or exploding tyres !!!!
    Just go for a large frame from a maker you are happy and confident in, and keep your tyres at around 60-70 psi. Go for it sounds like you are doing well.
  • Oh, im definately not 20 stone of blubber. My lower half is pretty trim and my calves are looking very muscley and toned as some of the wannabe milfs have mentioned! ;)

    Its my upper body where im carrying a bit of blub,but generally i pull it off well as my body frame is large anyway. Exploding tyres...wow, never heard of that before! Now im a little bit more concerned!
  • Bear77Bear77 Posts: 60
    I would only think that wheels may be a problem. Some of the racier ones have weight limits for exampel Fulcrum wheels say you should check them if you way more than 82kgs. Maybe look at bikes with more traditional 32 or 36 spoke wheels rathaer than 14 spokers :)
    The revolution will not be televised
  • Rob.MRob.M Posts: 88
    Hi mate, I'm 6ft 3 and weigh seventeen stone, I ride a Cannondale racer which cost about the same amount. Never had a problem with wheels, tyres etc apart from the usual wear and tear. Most bikes at this price point come equipped with 32hole rims which will suit you fine. Congrats on the weight loss by the way!!! :)
    It's never too late to become what you might have been...........
  • Bear77 wrote:
    I would only think that wheels may be a problem. Some of the racier ones have weight limits for exampel Fulcrum wheels say you should check them if you way more than 82kgs. Maybe look at bikes with more traditional 32 or 36 spoke wheels rathaer than 14 spokers :)

    Correct there, i am 20 st 6ft 6 and have a trek 1.5 great bike apart from back wheel spokes kept on snapping with the power going through them untill it finally fell to bits in the middle of no where this week so had the lbs build me a 36 spoker to hopefully compensate for my power, so go for it and get a roady but ensure your back wheel is strong enough.
  • Hi mate i'm 6' 2" and when i started cycling 2 years ago was nearly 18 stone. I bought a GT transeo hybrid bike and changed the tyres for 700 x 23's and put some heavier rim tape in. It was relatively cheap £300 and has lasted ages never letting me down. It's a bit heavy to be fair but it's sturdy. Giant do a good range of what they call fitness and hybrid bikes.

    Good luck mate and excellent news on shifting those pounds.

    Respect
    Cube Ltd Pro!

    Bianchi C2C via Nirone
  • I Purchased a Scott carbon CR1 as a reward for getting to 20st. I upgraded the wheels to Easton EA70s as easton are a hand built wheel with no weightlimit. the thing to be careful of is that drop bars mean you will carry more of the weight through your shoulders. this means that instead of riding with slightly bent arms and using you're core muscles to support you, it is likely you will lock out the arms which can get uncomfortable.

    I opted to have riser bars fitted so its more like an uber fast hybrid. I have retained the drop bars and STIs so they can be refitted when I feel able to handle a lower position.

    I rode a felt qx75 prior to getting this bike with no issues at all from 22.5st down to 20st. I have always riden a carbon seat post with no problems what so ever. I check tyre pressure before every ride and spoke tension should also have a close eye kept on it but the eastons are proving very strong.

    although I think most wheels will do the job, its important you have confidence in the contact points so that is where id spend my money. I also changed my sadl to a charge spoon which is very comfy.

    if you want to get some lycra, I recommend Prendas Cyclisimo as they go up to 6xl which is about 50in chest (not cheap though).

    finally i would say do it, you wont regret it. if you are getting 16mph on a MTB you will be flying with a roadie.

    Cheers
    Paul
    Burning Fat Not Rubber

    Scott CR1
    Genesis IO ID
    Moda Canon
  • softladsoftlad Posts: 3,587
    rickhotrod wrote:
    If you were to get rim brakes and high pressure tyres, the tyres might explode stopping 20 stone down a very steep and long hill. This is because the rims will get very hot, which will heat up the air in the tyre, causing the air pressure to increase and exploding the tyre and possibly the rim too!

    *cough* bollocks *cough*

    I can't think of anything else to say - that is just such a load of rubbish. Might be an issue on 10 mile alpine descents in a mid-summer heatwave, but not an issue overhere. And the weight is largely irrelevent...
  • balthazarbalthazar Posts: 1,566
    Tandems are built for combined rider weights of 25-30 stones. Sometimes 40 spoke wheels are used, but otherwise there's nothing particularly special about them. I'd suggest traditional 36 spoke wheels for durability, and a general avoidance of lightweight kit; choosing a bike which has clearance for larger tyres (32mm or so) would be a good idea too, not essential, but simply for your comfort and to make pinch-flats less likely.

    Tyre blowoff from heat-induced pressure increase is a real problem for tandem and solo cyclists, but only on long switchback style downhills. It is easily prevented by letting some air out of the tyres before such a descent. I've never heard of hills like this in Britain.
  • I'm 6ft 9 and 19.75 stone at the moment and have been riding and touring on a Trek 7.5FX for 4 years. For touring or general fitness work I use a pair of hand built 36h wheels from Spa Cycles with 32c tyres for touring and 28c for general fitness rides.

    I'm just awaiting delivery of a Caad9 and am in the process of ordering another pair of hand built 36h wheels specifically for that bike.

    As for tyres exploding, I've had that twice in the course of two days whilst touring on the Pennine Cycleway. In both instances it happened after a long descent and only on tyres with puncture "goo" in them. Since then I've stopped using inner tubes with goo in them and I've done many more tours with not a hint of a blow out.

    My only advice to you would be to look at the cost of getting a pair of wheels built for you and factor that into your budget.
  • Gary67Gary67 Posts: 183
    Not adding anything to the bike issue,just wanted to say well done on the weight loss.
    12 stone in a year :shock: thats some going 8) atb in your bike search, Gary
  • keep tyres at 60-70 psi???? bit low isnt it? correct me if im wrong.

    I know guys who are around 16-18stone running nearer 110-120, and have no problems.
    Im 5'11 and 11.5stone, so not a huge guy but i run 120 if i ruin any less it doesnt feel right, just sluggish and too bouncy.
    “If you worried about falling off the bike, you’d never get on.”

    @mattbeedham
  • There's loads of fatties on here who get on fine with their road bikes. Just do it 8)


    PS 10-4 on the weight loss so far, kudos 8) :)
  • keep tyres at 60-70 psi???? bit low isnt it? correct me if im wrong.

    I know guys who are around 16-18stone running nearer 110-120, and have no problems.
    Im 5'11 and 11.5stone, so not a huge guy but i run 120 if i ruin any less it doesnt feel right, just sluggish and too bouncy.

    yes indeed. i run at 120 too. 60-70 will give you pinch flats on a proper road tyre if youre a big lad
    Burning Fat Not Rubber

    Scott CR1
    Genesis IO ID
    Moda Canon
  • skyd0gskyd0g Posts: 2,540
    Well done BigSte47 on your progress to-date! 8)
    There's lot's of practical help, advice & support on this thread: http://static.bikeradar.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=12628247&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=720 that you may find of interest.
    Keep up the good work! :D
    Cycling weakly
  • Sirius631Sirius631 Posts: 1,015
    keep tyres at 60-70 psi???? bit low isnt it? correct me if im wrong.

    +1. That is pinch flat territory. Plus, at that pressure you'll find the tyre and innertube progressing around the rim under braking and you will get punctures through the twisted valve stem being ripped from the carcass of your inner tube.
    To err is human, but to make a real balls up takes a super computer.
  • furragfurrag Posts: 481
    I can't answer your question, but I have to congratulate you. Absolutely fantastic! Keep up the great work!
  • NerrepNerrep Posts: 112
    I'm 6"4' and 95Kg and have had no problems even on the paired, low spoke count wheels that came with my Trek 1.5. The extra five stone you've got might mean that some more robust wheels might be advisable, but after that I can't imagine you'll have a problem.

    Ignore the comments about running at 60-70PSI: the heavier you are the more you will deflect the tyre at any given pressure, so you'll want to run higher; not lower pressures.

    Also, congratulations on your weight loss to date: 12 stone in a year is an absolutely phenomenal achievement.
  • cathaldcathald Posts: 105
    I'm 18 stone at the moment and running pretty standard alex rims with no problems at all
    I'm using a trek 1000 which I got for €300 and it is a great bike
    My LBS gave me out a brand new dolan carbon frame for a few days to try out to see if I liked it and perhaps I might buy one in the spring
    I dont think they would have given it to me if they thought I might have damaged it at my weight
    I am running 100psi in the tyres(700x25s) not a punture yet~(fingers crossed)

    Cathal
  • wilshawkwilshawk Posts: 119
    Im sure you get people who are reasoanbly heavy, like 12stone or more riding on those thin 23mm tires, so if that works, Id guess a 20stone guy could get by on say 38mm tires, just make sure they are always pumped up well.
  • WoodywmbWoodywmb Posts: 888
    I've just bought a Kona Dew Drop. Great machine ... for my kind of cycling,which is loads of paths as well as back roads. Unusual mix of drop bars, brifters, road cranks with MTB cassette, long arm derailleur and sloping top tube. Comes in about 10 sizes - I'm 5' 8" and the 52 (lower end) is my fitting so there's plenty of scope for bigger people. I would ask a bike shop to let you try out different makes and sizes though. There's a pile of bikes available at that price range. Decide when you get the fit right.
    On the subject of tyres and wheels blowing up,it once happened to me on a long descent. The well named Takmadoon Road at Kilsyth was the culprit. V brakes went through the rims after prolonged braking. One rim sprang out and caught the seattube. I thought the bike (MTB) had collapsed under me. Soon stopped though!
  • 17 st 6'4" riding a Raleigh Avanti U6 which comes with 26 spoke rear wheel, 24 spoke front, NO probs at all at my weight.

    Keep your tyre pressure up to about 110 rear 100 front and you will be fine... Despite their flimsy appearance, road bikes have proven to be incredibly durable!!

    (and as someone in another post mentioned, Rugby players often train on road bikes and some of those monsters are over 20 st!)
    exercise.png
  • Thank you everyone!! You've put my mind at ease :D
  • I am 18.5 stone.

    I have ridden my De Rosa Avant almost everyday in the two years that I have owned it, I run with Fulcrum 7's on 23's.

    Guess what ?..... I have never popped a spoke, had a tyre explode or been vapourized, better still the wheels run virtually as true as the day that they were bought.

    Crack on my friend, you will be absolutely fine. :wink:
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