Breaking 50 miles!!

pitchshifter
pitchshifter Posts: 1,476
edited February 2010 in Road beginners
Hi all.

This is my first post so go easy on me.

I have falling in love with my road bike over the last year and would ideally spend everyday on it but unfortunately this just isnt possible.

I managed to get out last week end hitting some of the Chiltern 100 route. Not knowing the area we stopped a few times to make sure we were going the right way!

Now is it me or are these stops punishing?! I felt great at 30 miles but after stopping for a bite to eat my legs were just dead for the crawl home! I wasn't huffing and puffing, I just couldnt push my legs any harder :? I am only 23....

We averaged about 16-17 mph for the first 30 miles. Is this just too fast to sustain for longer distances for someone who only manages to get out on weekends?

After making it home we clocked up 47 miles. I suffered similar problems last year when training for a tri. I assume this is a case of cycle slower and getting more regular base miles in?

Thanks

Comments

  • bobtbuilder
    bobtbuilder Posts: 1,537
    Your problem after stopping is usual I'm afraid. However, it should pass after a couple of miles riding again. You can improve this by stretching in your stopped time and keeping loose.

    I don't think pure speed is your problem. I can average 16-17 mph for up to 80 hilly miles and I am 37 years old. However, you may need to do slower rides to get the base miles in as you suggested. It's hard to tell without knowing how difficult an average of 16-17 mph is for you. Is it a flat-out effort, or is it a pace that you can maintain and still be breathing easily?

    You haven't mentioned much about food & drink in your post. Are you drinking an eating enough? On a 3 hour ride you will need to be drinking little and often and snacking on energy-rich foods to maintain your energy levels.
  • I had porridge for breakfast. Energy bar during the 30 miles with an energy drink and water.

    We stopped for an hour in Aston Clinton for chicken pie with mash! Took on a gel after about 3 miles of leaving as my legs felt awful. This helped a little. I normally keep a high cadence to try and combat it.

    I can maintain 16-17 mile an hour over a hilly course fairly easily untill reaching 35-40 miles. Heart rate is normally around 165-170.

    I have a high metabolism which may not help things on the nutrition side of things.

    thanks for the quick reply
  • Good Job, just be careful you don't get indigestion from eating meat!
  • I'd agree with bobtbuilder, it's common I have the same issue with stopping. I certainly wouldn't feel much like continuing a ride after pie and mash! IMHO any stop more than 10 minutes requires a proper stretch too...
  • skinson
    skinson Posts: 362
    Was this a leisure ride? I'd never stop for an hour on a 50 miler! Also pie and mash :shock: I'll have porridge and toast an hour before I set off, then just water whilst riding, and perhaps a cereal bar at half way with a 10 min stop. I usually average 16-17 over the ride.
    P.S. I'm 52
    Dave :wink:
  • John.T
    John.T Posts: 3,698
    Quite normal to struggle after a long stop. Your body thinks you have finished and gets on with recovery and food digestion etc. It is not keen on being woken up and asked to start work again. Keep the stops short and you will have less trouble. If you have to have a long stop (30min or more) then start again slowly until you warm up again.
  • Ok maybe the pie and mash was a bad idea... at the time an open fire was too tempting than continuing through the headwind and the horizontal hail!

    I will give it a go this Sunday and see how my legs hold up. Being out gunned by a 52 year old is not acceptable :wink: !

    Thanks
  • skinson
    skinson Posts: 362
    Don't worry about the age mate! I get outgunned by my friend, he's 70 this month :D
    Dave :wink:
  • Ahoy - although I agree with other replies (to some degree), I think it's more important
    that, you get the miles in.Yes, 'snacking' in particular is 'very important' as opposed to
    having a 'full blown' meal, especially if big miles are not involved.
    You 'dont' state how often your out or,how long you've been (on the bike) that,will play
    a big part in your endurance ability.
    Endurance, going or getting the distance will be aligned to the amount of 'time'spent on
    the bike.
    The old adage applies,run a marathon to run a marathon,and the same applies to the
    bike.
    Initially,forget about speed, build up an 'endurance base' and you'll get the distances in
    'nae bother' as you progress (and remember it takes time) you'll get quicker as well .
    And like the other guy say's,dont put to much emphises on age (or ability) there will be
    those who are 'greater' and also those who are 'lesser', put the 'miles' in and your turn will come to give some 'young' 67 yr old like me a good kicking ( if I'm having a bad day that is). Stick in. [/i][/b]
    It's not the life 'in' your bike, it's the life 'on' your bike.
  • bristolpete
    bristolpete Posts: 2,255
    Think about a heart rate monitor and use it to keep you in the required zone. It will help you expedite long rides in a big way. Riding at the heart rate required stops you exerting into other 'states' and is a great help.

    Well done on what you have done so far.
  • I went from a 20 mile as my longest run to do the London to Brighton which was a hell of a leap... I felt fine at the start, and at the end I had bags of energy left which amazed me!

    But as I stopped a couple of times, I felt that my body felt like a lead weight getting back on the bike, and took a couple of miles to shake the nauseous light headedness that inevitably came.

    maybe its the same thing.. just your body reacting to the stop and start, and taking more time as you went for a big meal half way round =) Eating a calorie rich meal will immediately divert a lot of your energy to digesting the meal, which is why we all suffer from the Sunday afternoon nap epidemic!!
    exercise.png
  • Scrumple
    Scrumple Posts: 2,665
    quit fretting and keep training.
    no pain....
  • tlw1
    tlw1 Posts: 21,996
    Scrumple wrote:
    quit fretting and keep training.
    no pain....

    covers it perfect
  • This is my first post so go easy on me.

    err... MTFU?
  • afcbian
    afcbian Posts: 424
    Sleep well, eat well before you ride, drink small and often during the ride, snack every hour, and enjoy the ride.
    I went out last weekend and did 42 miles and felt magic, I could have done another 20-30 with ease.
    Other times I feel like I struggle all the way round, like my legs are leaden and have very little energy.
    Just ride and enjoy it
    I ride therefore I am
  • oldwelshman
    oldwelshman Posts: 4,733
    Hi all.

    This is my first post so go easy on me.

    I have falling in love with my road bike over the last year and would ideally spend everyday on it but unfortunately this just isnt possible.

    I managed to get out last week end hitting some of the Chiltern 100 route. Not knowing the area we stopped a few times to make sure we were going the right way!

    Now is it me or are these stops punishing?! I felt great at 30 miles but after stopping for a bite to eat my legs were just dead for the crawl home! I wasn't huffing and puffing, I just couldnt push my legs any harder :? I am only 23....

    We averaged about 16-17 mph for the first 30 miles. Is this just too fast to sustain for longer distances for someone who only manages to get out on weekends?

    After making it home we clocked up 47 miles. I suffered similar problems last year when training for a tri. I assume this is a case of cycle slower and getting more regular base miles in?

    Thanks

    Its called cafe bonk :D Very common. Just ride slower and higher cadence for couple of miles after the stop, like a warm up.
    Just keep doing what your doing you will get fitter and faster.