Pedal Removal

Coach H
Coach H Posts: 1,092
edited February 2010 in Workshop
Found myself with a pair of Look pedals (allen key only) that are proving very stuborn to remove and I can't get enough leverage.

Has anyone got any nice techniques for securing the cranks etc?
Coach H. (Dont ask me for training advice - 'It's not about the bike')

Comments

  • TommyEss
    TommyEss Posts: 1,855
    Number one - Are you unscrewing in the correct direction? The threads are reversed on one side, so it's not as simple as "Righty tighty, Lefty loosey"

    *(Tactfully waiting for someone to chip in and say which is which cos I always forget until I've got the bike in front of me... :oops: )

    And then, how long's your allen key - if it's a little one from a Halfords puncture repair kit it won't be long enough to give you much leverage at all - stick something on the end of it or buy a longer one.
    Cannondale Synapse 105, Giant Defy 3, Giant Omnium, Giant Trance X2, EMC R1.0, Ridgeback Platinum, On One Il Pompino...
  • Ben6899
    Ben6899 Posts: 9,686
    Non-drive side pedal is left-hand thread.

    With non-drive side pedal nearer to you than the bike (so handlebars to your left), you'll need to turn the spindle clockwise to loosen.
    Ben

    Bikes: Donhou DSS4 Custom | Condor Italia RC | Gios Megalite | Dolan Preffisio | Giant Bowery '76
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  • TommyEss
    TommyEss Posts: 1,855
    Yeah, that's right - loosen both sides by turning towards the back of the bike - that way it works whether you've got the bike on it's wheels or upside down...

    (Cheers Ben!)
    Cannondale Synapse 105, Giant Defy 3, Giant Omnium, Giant Trance X2, EMC R1.0, Ridgeback Platinum, On One Il Pompino...
  • Coach H
    Coach H Posts: 1,092
    Thanks for the input guys.

    I know the correct threading and am using a 5 inch long allen key.

    Still struggling to get enough leverage without cranks turning.

    (yes they were greased before installation, but obviously not enough)
    Coach H. (Dont ask me for training advice - 'It's not about the bike')
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Yep, you need to slip something over your allen key so you have a lever at least a foot long. I tend to use a hex key with something hefty from my socket set.

    One of the best ways of removing pedals is to have remembered to use grease or anti-sieze paste when installing them. :D
  • Mister W
    Mister W Posts: 791
    It's better to use an anti-sieze compound rather than grease. Grease reduces the friction between the pedal spindle and the crank which can result in you inadvertently over-tightening it, which can then result in you stripping the threads out of the crank.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    If you're still struggling with the things on the bike, you could remove the crankset and try with the crank in a vice, pedal downwards. trickle WD40 or plus-gas into the threads and leave overnight before having another go.
  • Plus gas, worked a treat on mine!
  • Coach H
    Coach H Posts: 1,092
    Mister W wrote:
    It's better to use an anti-sieze compound rather than grease. Grease reduces the friction between the pedal spindle and the crank which can result in you inadvertently over-tightening it, which can then result in you stripping the threads out of the crank.

    Pedals fitted at an LBS with one of the best reputations in the country, so I am assuming what they put on was appropriate.

    Thanks though, good point for the uninitiated.
    Coach H. (Dont ask me for training advice - 'It's not about the bike')
  • hopper1
    hopper1 Posts: 4,389
    I use a ratchet (+/- 15" long) with a allen key fitting, that gives me enough leverage.
    Start with a budget, finish with a mortgage!
  • I've helped someone get very stuck pedals off by pouring very hot (nearly boiling) water over the cranks - seemed to cause enough differential expansion to unstick them. Not too sure if we were just lucky though!
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    A little gentle heating was to be my next suggestion. Usually effective with alloy cranks / steel pedal spindles.

    Don't go at it with the blowlamp just after squirting it with plus-gas though! :shock:
  • Heat will work well.

    I've found that using grip to squeeze the allen key to the crank arm actually works very well. As does putting the opposing pedal underneath something so as you push down on one side it lifts the other. But you need a really heavy bench or something like that.

    Alternatively whip the cranks off and stick them in a vice with leather jaws.
  • Porgy
    Porgy Posts: 4,525
    Coach H wrote:
    Has anyone got any nice techniques for securing the cranks etc?

    My man down the LBS seems to manage quite well 8)
  • pneumatic
    pneumatic Posts: 1,989
    I rounded the ends off 4 allen keys on a mate's pedals last Summer (leverage isn't everything, I discovered!)

    In the end, I soaked the join with 3in1 easing oil and left it overnight. It worked.

    As for stopping the cranks from turning, if you angle the crank at twenty to eight, it usually holds still enough against the allen key pushing down from a quarter past three (if you get my drift).


    Fast and Bulbous
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    Eddingtons: 80 (Metric); 60 (Imperial)

  • a_n_t
    a_n_t Posts: 2,011
    took my cranks off, in a vice, little propane burner and voila, 5 seconds later - pedal off!
    Manchester wheelers

    PB's
    10m 20:21 2014
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  • hopper1
    hopper1 Posts: 4,389
    At this time of year, the kettle will probably be sufficient, as all the steels involved will be very cold, and the alloy will react much quicker than the pedal spindle.

    I'll wait for a post grad to come along and blow this out of the water, now.... :wink:
    Start with a budget, finish with a mortgage!