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Help with setting up my new bike

dan1502dan1502 Posts: 568
edited January 2010 in MTB workshop & tech
Hi, I've just received my new bike and have set most of it up but have a few questions. I'm completely new to this so please bear with me.

It's a Kona Kula Deluxe 29er 2008.

I read the set-up guide on here and I've set the saddle height and pushed it back as far as it will go. I tried the plumb line test and it's probably a couple of centimeters forward of the ideal with the seat as far back as it will go but I'm guessing that won't be too much of an issue. If I stand in the middle of the frame there's not that much of a gap (about three fingers) so I think the bigger frame would be a bit too big.

Anyway, how tight should the following be: quick releases, handle bar clamp (both sets), seat clamp. So far I've just gone hand tight and a bit on the small bolts and on the larger ones I've used allen key sockets with a ratchet but held it at the socket end and just tightened it a bit. I will get a torque wrench so would like to know what they should be at but does that sound ok for now?

Also, how do I tell how tight the chain should be? It seems fairly slack and the adjustment seems to be almost as far back in the frame as it will go.

I've just ordered a shock pump so should be able to sort that out (I may pop over to my local cycle shop to get that set initially tomorrow).

Any help appreciated. Now I just have to learn how everything works!

Should I get it checked over by someone before riding it and if so is there someone willing in the Manchester area?
Santa Cruz Tallboy

Posts

  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    The instructions should tell you how tight most things need to be. The derailer takes up chain slack - make sure the wheels are fully in the droputs if you have been fiddling with it.

    As for the plumb line test it means very little - go for what feels best to you.

    Also check the Park Tools website.
  • dan1502dan1502 Posts: 568
    Ok, the instructions don't give torque settings. The chain just seemed to slap the frame very easily though it does have a protective sticker in that area.

    I'll have a look on the Park Tools website as you suggest and will probably buy or borrow a low torque torque wrench.
    Santa Cruz Tallboy
  • stumpyjonstumpyjon Posts: 4,069
    Quick release should be tight enough to leave a mark on your hand as you tighten them. Bars etc. torqued to the correct value although what you have done sounds pretty good, most people over tighten stuff and crush things or strip threads.

    As for the shock pump, you need to set the sag, basically pump the forks up until they sag 25% ish when you are sat on the bike with full riding kit on.

    As for bike shops, depends on which end of Manchester you are. If it's north Manchester I'd recommend a little trip up the M66 to Rawtenstall. My LBS, Ride On, are pretty good, plus there's lots of good riding up here once you get some hill climbing into your legs (plus Lee Quarry trail centre).
    It's easier to ask for forgiveness than for permission.

    I've bought a new bike....ouch - result
    Can I buy a new bike?...No - no result
  • dan1502dan1502 Posts: 568
    Thanks Jon, I think the front quick release is probably ok but the rear (which was already set) seems a little easy to clamp to me. I've read up on setting the shocks and how to check them but am not sure how the adjustment should be set whilst testing (if it makes any difference).

    Is a low range torque wrench an essential bit of kit? If it is I'll get one but the costs are mounting up quickly at the moment.

    I'm in Sale so a bit far for me to go to a shop but not to go for a ride once I've learned how to pedal a bike again. These XT shifters look complicated though I've not read the instructions yet.
    Santa Cruz Tallboy
  • stumpyjonstumpyjon Posts: 4,069
    The XT shifters are great when you get used to them, got them on both my main mountain bikes. A torque wrench is useful if you're going to do a lot of fettling. You'll probably need a set of allen key bits to go with it. A lot of people don't have one, I do and use it most of the time but not always. They are more essential if you've got carbon bars or a carbon seat post, they can be easy to crush.

    Thing to remember with quick releases is that usual forks and frames are designed so wheels won't fall out even if they come undone (forks in particular usually have lips to prevent wheel loss). I must admit though I did once yank my rear wheel out of the drops outs stomping on the pedals, reminded me to be more careful tightening them in the future.
    It's easier to ask for forgiveness than for permission.

    I've bought a new bike....ouch - result
    Can I buy a new bike?...No - no result
  • dan1502dan1502 Posts: 568
    I have allen key bits already and socket sets. I used to some of my own car maintenance a few years back so have a reasonable collection of tools. I always used to borrow a torque wrench though and would need a low torque one anyway. I'll probably leave it for now and see if I can pick one up cheap second hand. My concern was that it's very easy to over tighten things when you have a 3/8 socket set and allen sockets so I have erred on the cautious side.

    I just want to get to the stage where I can do basic maintenance and checks with the confidence that I'm doing it correctly as I like to look after my stuff.
    Santa Cruz Tallboy
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    You eventually get a feel for these torques, though a wrench can be useful to start.
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