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Help, what Bike for daily commute?!

trejmastrejmas Posts: 4
edited January 2010 in Commuting chat
I need a little bit advice! I cycle around 15 miles a day to commute to work in London; using currently mountain bike which is slowly falling apart and therefor I am looking into buying new bike. I have been doing spin classes for a quite long time now and would like to try a new bike which will be faster and more challenging. I would like a bike which will be fast but also at the same time very reliable and safe regardless weather (summer or winter, rain or snow). Also durability is very important for me since I am planing to use it on regular basis on London's streets and I would like to last it for at least couple years ( with as little punctures as possible). I would be very greatfull for your thoughts! What kind of bike shall I go for: hybrid, road bike or cyclo-cross bikes?
Thanks
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Posts

  • il_principeil_principe Posts: 9,151
    Road Bike - you'll have the most fun/get the most use out of that, but be prepared to throw a decent wedge at it and make sure you keep the drivechain clean, serviced and lubed up - if you look after a decent bike properly it should last for ages. Invest in good tires as well - something like Vittoria Rubino Pro's are v p*ncture resistant and hard wearing.
    2015 Canyon Aeroad CF SLX
    2020 Canyon Ultimate CF SLX
    2020 Canyon Inflite SL 7
    On the Strand
    Crown Stables
  • bigmatbigmat Posts: 5,132
    If you check out the winter weather threads you'll see that very few of the roadies were out in the snow. If you really want a bike for all seasons I'd look at getting a non-suspension mountain bike / hybrid, once fitted with slicks and with the right gearing (11 tooth at the back) you'll be damn near as fast as a road bike, if you go for 7 / 8 speed drivetrain likely to be more durable and replacement parts cheaper. Brakes better in wet conditions. Less desirable to thieves.

    A road bike WILL be quicker, and more options if you want to do longer rides at weekends etc, but based on the level of practicality you seem to want I wouldn't say it would be the best choice.
  • in keeping in friday style - one with two wheels, a chain and bars and probably a seat too...

    oh and pedals and a frame too...
    Le Cannon [98 Cannondale M400] [FCN: 8]
    The Mad Monkey [2013 Hoy 003] [FCN: 4]
  • il_principeil_principe Posts: 9,151
    MatHammond wrote:
    If you check out the winter weather threads you'll see that very few of the roadies were out in the snow. If you really want a bike for all seasons I'd look at getting a non-suspension mountain bike / hybrid, once fitted with slicks and with the right gearing (11 tooth at the back) you'll be damn near as fast as a road bike, if you go for 7 / 8 speed drivetrain likely to be more durable and replacement parts cheaper. Brakes better in wet conditions. Less desirable to thieves.

    A road bike WILL be quicker, and more options if you want to do longer rides at weekends etc, but based on the level of practicality you seem to want I wouldn't say it would be the best choice.

    I disagree - the OP commutes in London, a MTB would be pointless. We get snow rarely as it is (ok the last 2 years have been a bit of a freak) otherwise a roadie will get you to work quickly and comfortably pretty much all year round. I've been doing this on a roadie for a good few years and I can't say that (snow aside) the weather causes any problems, I had no issue braking in the wet this morning - as long as you anticipate and use good brake pads (kool stop are ace).

    Mid level Shimano/campag is very durable and not overly expensive. I'm currently commuting on an 06 Focus roadbike (Shimano Ultegra), I've changed brake pads, chainrings, chain, cables and cassette but nothing else in 3.5 years. All those parts just went with wear and tear - and this is a bike that is used for winter training at weekends, not just as a commuter.

    Buying a hybrid to deal with the 1 week of snow we *might* get once every few years is a pointless compromise. I started out with a hybrid - what a total waste of money that was.
    2015 Canyon Aeroad CF SLX
    2020 Canyon Ultimate CF SLX
    2020 Canyon Inflite SL 7
    On the Strand
    Crown Stables
  • tiny_penstiny_pens Posts: 293
    Have at look at the cyclocross bikes. They are pretty quick, can take high pressure tyres for speed, knobbly tyres for snow (which I can attest to having more grip than my shoes on the ice) and mudguards which I think are essential as they keep (some of) the road muck off fragile components which means less cleaning and maintenance. A lot of the lower range models also have mounting points for racks to allow you to carry your stuff to work in panniers and is useful for the weekly shop as well.

    I like the Kona Jake. Lots of other people like the Tricross. Yes they are a compromise but if you only want / have room for one bike they may be the right compromise for you.
  • bigmatbigmat Posts: 5,132
    To be fair, he did specifically say he wants a bike that will deal with all kinds of weather, snow included. To be honest any of the kind of bikes suggested will do the job but I'm not sure a road bike is ideal for the specific criteria he has listed. The cost of upkeep of my commuter is practically zero - in an average year I'll change the front brakeblocks maybe once, lube it once or twice, that is it. That is durability on another level to any roadbike (my own included). Also very few visits from the PF (although to be fair I'm generally pretty lucky with that).
  • bigmatbigmat Posts: 5,132
    tiny_pens wrote:
    Have at look at the cyclocross bikes. They are pretty quick, can take high pressure tyres for speed, knobbly tyres for snow (which I can attest to having more grip than my shoes on the ice) and mudguards which I think are essential as they keep (some of) the road muck off fragile components which means less cleaning and maintenance. A lot of the lower range models also have mounting points for racks to allow you to carry your stuff to work in panniers and is useful for the weekly shop as well.

    I like the Kona Jake. Lots of other people like the Tricross. Yes they are a compromise but if you only want / have room for one bike they may be the right compromise for you.

    Yep, crosser may well be the answer here.
  • I used to commute on my road bikes (Trek Madone in the summer, Giant SCR 1.5 in the winter), but have recently switched to this:

    http://www.evanscycles.com/products/bmc ... bmc%20cx02

    With the knobblies on it's more comfortable than a road bike and can be bumped up and down kerbs etc. but is almost as quick as the road bike was.

    This one doesn't appear to be available any more - but the Boardman cyclo cross bike looks good.
  • Hybrid all the way for me mate - cycle 20 miles a day in London on my trusty old Trek 7.1FX. Easy to maintain and an absolutely solid frame. Cost me about £250 new and I reckon I've spent about £100 a year on new parts since I got it 4 years ago. Rag some skinny tyres (Schwalbe Marathon Plus are great at keeping punctures out) and SPDS on it and you'll be surprised by how many "Got all the gear" Roadies you pass!

    It does depend on your commute of course but my bike takes a lot kerb, pathway and parkland abuse - the main reason I've not invested in a nice road bike.
  • I personally think that if what you're wanting is a low-maintenance, reasonably quick and bomb-proof bike you could so a lot worse than the Genesis Day-one single-speed cross bike. Road tyres for any weather other than snow, keep the CX tyres for winter.

    http://www.genesisbikes.co.uk/bikes/cross/day-one/

    (Though I rode my Road bike in the slush and snow, and it was perfectly OK; but seeing all the salt and slush clogging up my expensive drive train made me more than a little sad.)
  • I personally think that if what you're wanting is a low-maintenance, reasonably quick and bomb-proof bike you could so a lot worse than the Genesis Day-one single-speed cross bike. Road tyres for any weather other than snow, keep the CX tyres for winter.

    http://www.genesisbikes.co.uk/bikes/cross/day-one/

    (Though I rode my Road bike in the slush and snow, and it was perfectly OK; but seeing all the salt and slush clogging up my expensive drive train made me more than a little sad.)

    +1 - nothing simpler for bomb-proof-ness and low maintenance than a good quality SS
  • amneziaamnezia Posts: 590
    I cycled all through winter and the snow on a road bike with 23mm race tires, it hasn't been properly cleaned since December and its still working fine.

    The whole road bikes aren't durable / not suitable for winter is nonsense
  • iPeteiPete Posts: 6,076
    Budget? are you going through a ride to work scheme?

    I use a roadie, see signature, to cover 34 miles in and out of London.

    I do miss things like super sharp brakes and the ability to stop on a coin as can be done on my MTB & do wish for a hybrid sometimes. However the roadie is quicker and can be used for fast weekend rides etc.

    Buying now, I'd seriously consider a Tifosi CK7, its an audax road bike, so good for fast touring, has all you'd need to add panniers, has mud guards as standard and should remain comfortable for long distances and still be fast when stripped down.

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Tifos ... 360045766/
  • il_principeil_principe Posts: 9,151
    Also remember that ability to handle kerb bumping etc is to do with wheel strength, not bike type. I wager that my Fulcrum 0's are far tougher than the wheels that come with a £250 hybrid. Road bikes are not made of cheese, some hybrids are. :D
    2015 Canyon Aeroad CF SLX
    2020 Canyon Ultimate CF SLX
    2020 Canyon Inflite SL 7
    On the Strand
    Crown Stables
  • suzybsuzyb Posts: 3,449
    Also remember that ability to handle kerb bumping etc is to do with wheel strength, not bike type. I wager that my Fulcrum 0's are far tougher than the wheels that come with a £250 hybrid. Road bikes are not made of cheese, some hybrids are. :D
    Now you have me worried about the wheels on my £270 hybrid :(
  • bigmatbigmat Posts: 5,132
    -null- wrote:
    Also remember that ability to handle kerb bumping etc is to do with wheel strength, not bike type. I wager that my Fulcrum 0's are far tougher than the wheels that come with a £250 hybrid. Road bikes are not made of cheese, some hybrids are. :D
    Now you have me worried about the wheels on my £270 hybrid :(

    Don't worry, that extra £20 will have gone on making the wheels stronger! :lol:
  • W1W1 Posts: 2,636
    deebizzle wrote:
    Hybrid all the way for me mate - cycle 20 miles a day in London on my trusty old Trek 7.1FX. Easy to maintain and an absolutely solid frame. Cost me about £250 new and I reckon I've spent about £100 a year on new parts since I got it 4 years ago. Rag some skinny tyres (Schwalbe Marathon Plus are great at keeping punctures out) and SPDS on it and you'll be surprised by how many "Got all the gear" Roadies you pass!

    It does depend on your commute of course but my bike takes a lot kerb, pathway and parkland abuse - the main reason I've not invested in a nice road bike.

    I'd agree with this. Look at the Revolution Courier range at the Edinburgh Bicycle Co-Op - good spec for the money.
  • i have loads of posts on here with the same question as i went through it and the roadies always give the same answer as they think they are always right.

    i decided on a hybrid, and its superb. nice stance for riding through town, can carry a rucksack easily, ive got internal hub gears so maintenance free, and from the use of it so far is nearly as fast as the road bikes, with better disk brakes. for commuting what else do you need?

    check out the ridgeback 04 flight.
  • bigmatbigmat Posts: 5,132
    chrishumes wrote:
    i have loads of posts on here with the same question as i went through it and the roadies always give the same answer as they think they are always right.

    i decided on a hybrid, and its superb. nice stance for riding through town, can carry a rucksack easily, ive got internal hub gears so maintenance free, and from the use of it so far is nearly as fast as the road bikes, with better disk brakes. for commuting what else do you need?

    check out the ridgeback 04 flight.

    Ridgeback - now you're talking! ;)
  • Eau RougeEau Rouge Posts: 1,118
    chrishumes wrote:
    for commuting what else do you need?

    To want to get on it and cycle to work on those raining dark winter mornings when it's tempting to take the car instead. The hard men of the peleton ride Paris-Roubaix in the mud. Hybrids ain't got no soul like that.
    :)
  • chrishumes wrote:
    i have loads of posts on here with the same question as i went through it and the roadies always give the same answer as they think they are always right.

    i decided on a hybrid, and its superb. nice stance for riding through town, can carry a rucksack easily, ive got internal hub gears so maintenance free, and from the use of it so far is nearly as fast as the road bikes, with better disk brakes. for commuting what else do you need?

    check out the ridgeback 04 flight.

    It's a natural progression, innit? Everyone starts on the BSO mountain bike they never rode and has been in the shed for ages, then they buy a hybrid and say it's the best thing ever. It is, well compared to the mountain bike. Eventually they get fed up and buy a road bike.

    I did a short-cut and went straight from the BSO to the road bike, which I think will save me money; how many people do you know who've ridden hybrids for several years?
  • il_principeil_principe Posts: 9,151

    It's a natural progression, innit? Everyone starts on the BSO mountain bike they never rode and has been in the shed for ages, then they buy a hybrid and say it's the best thing ever. It is, well compared to the mountain bike. Eventually they get fed up and buy a road bike.

    I did a short-cut and went straight from the BSO to the road bike, which I think will save me money; how many people do you know who've ridden hybrids for several years?

    I didn't, I bought a Hybrid - A Ridgeback funnily enough. Soon upgraded that to a Specialized Allez when the Ridgeback was stolen. In fact the only bike of mine that's ever been stolen was the hybrid, go figure. I reckon casual thieves prefer them, roadies just scare them off!
    2015 Canyon Aeroad CF SLX
    2020 Canyon Ultimate CF SLX
    2020 Canyon Inflite SL 7
    On the Strand
    Crown Stables
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    trejmas

    What is your budget?
  • suzybsuzyb Posts: 3,449
    It's a natural progression, innit? Everyone starts on the BSO mountain bike they never rode and has been in the shed for ages, then they buy a hybrid and say it's the best thing ever. It is, well compared to the mountain bike. Eventually they get fed up and buy a road bike.
    Yep that's me :oops: Although I don't think my hybrid is th best thing ever.
  • Everyone starts on the BSO mountain bike they never rode and has been in the shed for ages,

    I didn't, I bought a Hybrid - A Ridgeback funnily enough. Soon upgraded that to a Specialized Allez when the Ridgeback was stolen. In fact the only bike of mine that's ever been stolen was the hybrid, go figure. I reckon casual thieves prefer them, roadies just scare them off!

    Didn't have a BSO in the shed though, did you? :P

    Thieves probably worry that road bike brakes don't work and that the wheels will fall to pieces when you hit a slight pot-hole. :twisted:
  • -null- wrote:
    It's a natural progression, innit? Everyone starts on the BSO mountain bike they never rode and has been in the shed for ages, then they buy a hybrid and say it's the best thing ever. It is, well compared to the mountain bike. Eventually they get fed up and buy a road bike.
    Yep that's me :oops: Although I don't think my hybrid is th best thing ever.

    Aw, go on, buy yourself a road bike. You deserve it!
  • W1W1 Posts: 2,636
    chrishumes wrote:
    i have loads of posts on here with the same question as i went through it and the roadies always give the same answer as they think they are always right.

    i decided on a hybrid, and its superb. nice stance for riding through town, can carry a rucksack easily, ive got internal hub gears so maintenance free, and from the use of it so far is nearly as fast as the road bikes, with better disk brakes. for commuting what else do you need?

    check out the ridgeback 04 flight.

    It's a natural progression, innit? Everyone starts on the BSO mountain bike they never rode and has been in the shed for ages, then they buy a hybrid and say it's the best thing ever. It is, well compared to the mountain bike. Eventually they get fed up and buy a road bike.

    I did a short-cut and went straight from the BSO to the road bike, which I think will save me money; how many people do you know who've ridden hybrids for several years?

    Me, for one. Four years now. Did try a road bike for a week - personally didn't work for me and I wasn't keen to spend that much on a bike which gets such abuse. Overall what delays me most are traffic lights - road bike or hybrid - and if it's a bit harder work on a hybrid that only makes you fitter. Helps with the FCN to be on a hybrid too.....
  • suzybsuzyb Posts: 3,449
    -null- wrote:
    It's a natural progression, innit? Everyone starts on the BSO mountain bike they never rode and has been in the shed for ages, then they buy a hybrid and say it's the best thing ever. It is, well compared to the mountain bike. Eventually they get fed up and buy a road bike.
    Yep that's me :oops: Although I don't think my hybrid is th best thing ever.
    Aw, go on, buy yourself a road bike. You deserve it!
    I'm thinking about it after spotting this on ebay this morning.
  • -null- wrote:
    -null- wrote:
    It's a natural progression, innit? Everyone starts on the BSO mountain bike they never rode and has been in the shed for ages, then they buy a hybrid and say it's the best thing ever. It is, well compared to the mountain bike. Eventually they get fed up and buy a road bike.
    Yep that's me :oops: Although I don't think my hybrid is th best thing ever.
    Aw, go on, buy yourself a road bike. You deserve it!
    I'm thinking about it after spotting this on ebay this morning.

    Looks good to me! DOOOOOO IIIIITTTTT!!!!! :twisted:
  • suzybsuzyb Posts: 3,449
    -null- wrote:
    -null- wrote:
    It's a natural progression, innit? Everyone starts on the BSO mountain bike they never rode and has been in the shed for ages, then they buy a hybrid and say it's the best thing ever. It is, well compared to the mountain bike. Eventually they get fed up and buy a road bike.
    Yep that's me :oops: Although I don't think my hybrid is th best thing ever.
    Aw, go on, buy yourself a road bike. You deserve it!
    I'm thinking about it after spotting this on ebay this morning.

    Looks good to me! DOOOOOO IIIIITTTTT!!!!! :twisted:
    Too late :(
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