From a fitness bike to a racer

w2darren
w2darren Posts: 51
edited January 2010 in Road beginners
i have a lappeire rcr 900 fitness bike, it seems to me to look very much like a racer with carbon frame, 700 * 25 tyre, it just has flat handle bars with bar ends, is the differnce huge between fitness - racer bikes. what i want is comfort, easy handling, smooth controls and speed,plus to look good. if i do change i have around 5000 euros so i really want to be sure. i plan to do be up 160 km by summer, i'm 44 and have been on the above bike for a year, , so may be if i do change i can use this bike for winter training. Any advice is welcome Thanks My local dealer was saying for the money i may be spending that a LOOK 586 or 595 dura ace custom built would be a good buy, plus they do the complet bike fitting. Also on this site i saw a Trek Modone 6.9 that belonged to pokerface, wow what a bike, how much me says??.

Comments

  • hopper1
    hopper1 Posts: 4,389
    Hi Darren... Welcome to the dark side...

    Wow, £4420 is a lot to be budgeting on a 'first' road bike. That will buy you a whole lot of bike.
    I'd be reluctant to shell that out on the first bike your LBS suggests, too. At this price range you really need to be getting on the bikes and trying before you buy.
    I would say that a good 'sportive' road bike would suit your needs, and these can be had from £2000, including Dura Ace!
    The bike fitting is a must, if it's done by professionals.
    The Madone 6.9 is a top machine, I'm sure Pokerface, among others on here, will be able to give more info on them, as they (Trek) have a wide range and two different geometries, too.
    Good luck, but don't rush into a deal too quickly. :wink:
    Start with a budget, finish with a mortgage!
  • hopper1 wrote:
    Hi Darren... Welcome to the dark side...

    Wow, £4420 is a lot to be budgeting on a 'first' road bike. That will buy you a whole lot of bike.
    I'd be reluctant to shell that out on the first bike your LBS suggests, too. At this price range you really need to be getting on the bikes and trying before you buy.
    I would say that a good 'sportive' road bike would suit your needs, and these can be had from £2000, including Dura Ace!
    The bike fitting is a must, if it's done by professionals.
    The Madone 6.9 is a top machine, I'm sure Pokerface, among others on here, will be able to give more info on them, as they (Trek) have a wide range and two different geometries, too.
    Good luck, but don't rush into a deal too quickly. :wink:
    thanks hopper1 for your advice i will take it on board.
  • nolf
    nolf Posts: 1,287
    +1 to don't buy too expensive a bike.

    TBH I'd buy say a £1k bike, get some practice and training, and then, a year later blow the rest on a £3.2k bike. The older bike becomes your winter bike, and you still have a 3 grand bike (which will get you pretty much top end for everything).

    If you are spending this much I would very seriously recommend getting some multiples.
    E.g some cheaper more sturdy training wheels with some harder wearing tyres for normal riding, then some nice lightweight carbon wheels for summer or sportives/races.
    Means you don't wear out the super expensive wheels, but still have them for special occasions.

    Buying 2 bikes means that you can afford to use 1 in bad weather, or when it may get damaged, and leave the more expensive 1 in perfect condition.
    "I hold it true, what'er befall;
    I feel it, when I sorrow most;
    'Tis better to have loved and lost;
    Than never to have loved at all."

    Alfred Tennyson
  • ride_whenever
    ride_whenever Posts: 13,279
    hang on, what's with the buy two bikes?

    How about get your fitness bike converted to drop bars, you would need about £250-£300 for that, and would instantly give you a training bike, your frame is used for some of the lapierre road bikes. This would be the cheapest way of getting yourself a road bike to try, and you'd end up with a rather nice machine!

    If you get on with it then you'd have just over 4 grand (GBP) to drop on a really tasty road bike.
  • turnerjohn
    turnerjohn Posts: 1,069
    nolf wrote:
    +1 to don't buy too expensive a bike.

    TBH I'd buy say a £1k bike, get some practice and training, and then, a year later blow the rest on a £3.2k bike. The older bike becomes your winter bike, and you still have a 3 grand bike (which will get you pretty much top end for everything).

    If you are spending this much I would very seriously recommend getting some multiples.
    E.g some cheaper more sturdy training wheels with some harder wearing tyres for normal riding, then some nice lightweight carbon wheels for summer or sportives/races.
    Means you don't wear out the super expensive wheels, but still have them for special occasions.

    Buying 2 bikes means that you can afford to use 1 in bad weather, or when it may get damaged, and leave the more expensive 1 in perfect condition.

    +2 For not spending quite so much !
    I have a Look 586 ISP Dura Ace the works, but that was my 4th road bike (still have a Giant TCR carbon for the winter :-) ) over 4 years.
    Would suggest (like the others here) to start small and work your way up.
    Oh would highly recommend the 586 tho :D