Cleaning your road bike in winter?

bigpikle
bigpikle Posts: 1,690
edited December 2009 in Road beginners
I was reading the other thread about winter hacks and the comments about the need to remove road salt etc, it got me wondering how people clean their road bikes during the winter season?

I have my frame and hub surfaces waxed with a durable protective wax, so am not really worried about that, but what about the drivetrain? Is it just a question of a rinse with water to remove salt/grit from surfaces and then a re-lube?

Its the frequent maintenance wash routine I'm interested in, rather than the hour spent in a detailed deep clean.

Thanks
Your Past is Not Your Potential...

Comments

  • redddraggon
    redddraggon Posts: 10,862
    Hosepipe bike down.

    Then clean chain/cassette/chainrings, then lube chain.

    No need for any special wax or other crap like that.
    I like bikes...

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  • +1 what redddragon said.
  • Hosepipe bike down.

    Then clean chain/cassette/chainrings, then lube chain.

    No need for any special wax or other crap like that.

    +1
    Neil
    Help I'm Being Oppressed
  • morrisje
    morrisje Posts: 507
    Same for me. Quick hose down to get rid of the loose filth. Spray muc-off over everything. Leave for an hour. Hose off, wipe down the chain and apply oil. Maybe a wipe on any areas not totally clean. Next day after 5 minutes it's filthy again.
  • sheffsimon
    sheffsimon Posts: 1,282
    Put bike in shed.

    Remove when next required.

    Ride, then return to shed.

    Wash bike once a month, lube chain after wash.

    Everything is either sealed bearings or well bedded in grease, so whats to go wrong :)
  • Put bike in shed.

    Remove when next required.

    Ride, then return to shed.

    Wash bike once a month, lube chain after wash.


    +1, apart from the wash/lube bit.


    oh, road bike? every ride. ;)
  • redddraggon
    redddraggon Posts: 10,862
    SheffSimon wrote:
    Everything is either sealed bearings or well bedded in grease, so whats to go wrong :)

    In my experience putting away the bike wet with winter road crap, will cause alloy components to corrode - may not be a performance issue, but I'd rather my components didn't look like crap.
    I like bikes...

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  • APIII
    APIII Posts: 2,010
    SheffSimon wrote:
    Everything is either sealed bearings or well bedded in grease, so whats to go wrong :)

    In my experience putting away the bike wet with winter road crap, will cause alloy components to corrode - may not be a performance issue, but I'd rather my components didn't look like crap.

    Not my experience, but depends on the quality of the components I guess.
  • jgsi
    jgsi Posts: 5,062
    If you rely on your bicycle then a routine clean down after the day's ride is the least you can do to ensure it is going to continue to be fit for purpose each and every day.
    That 'slow puncture' is not going to raise its head if you shove bike straight into shed and forget about it... until next time you want to ride and then you'll probably post on here as to the unworthiness of this particular brand of tyre letting you down :wink:as well as being a very annoying start to the day
    If your road bike gets the occasional weekend run then a clean down is as important... some have spent £000's if not £0000s and a poorly looked after bike will quickly become an eyesore.. of course if you money to burn and can replace shiny bike after shiny bike.......but I have seen enough munters for sale on Ebay to know that people can be basically lazy.
  • redddraggon
    redddraggon Posts: 10,862
    APIII wrote:
    SheffSimon wrote:
    Everything is either sealed bearings or well bedded in grease, so whats to go wrong :)

    In my experience putting away the bike wet with winter road crap, will cause alloy components to corrode - may not be a performance issue, but I'd rather my components didn't look like crap.

    Not my experience, but depends on the quality of the components I guess.

    FSA headsets, most shimano stuff, centaur chainrings, veloce rear mech IME.

    Only takes 5mins to hose down the bike anyway.
    I like bikes...

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  • So I gather you guys that just dump your bike in the shed and remove when needed, do not do a tyre and nut check either before you go out on a ride?
  • bigpikle
    bigpikle Posts: 1,690
    lots of input - thanks guys

    when people say "clean chain/cassette/chainrings" do you mean degreaser, brush etc etc or just a wipe over?

    I tend to have a fear of liberal use of degreasers and rinsing etc fearing you are going to get it into bearings and other areas where you want the lubrication to remain?

    cheers
    Your Past is Not Your Potential...
  • solsurf
    solsurf Posts: 489
    Just cleaned my bike down with snow, its like the things been polished :)

    If you have no snow and its cold i.e. hose pipe would cause an iced drive I wipe my one down with decrease wipes and then lube.

    Its the salt that is the problem, it really does bugger things up. I do wonder if bike part technology has been left behind. Cars used to rot 20 years ago that was solve but bikes seem to corrode when you look at them :roll:
  • APIII
    APIII Posts: 2,010
    APIII wrote:
    SheffSimon wrote:
    Everything is either sealed bearings or well bedded in grease, so whats to go wrong :)

    In my experience putting away the bike wet with winter road crap, will cause alloy components to corrode - may not be a performance issue, but I'd rather my components didn't look like crap.

    Not my experience, but depends on the quality of the components I guess.

    FSA headsets, most shimano stuff, centaur chainrings, veloce rear mech IME.

    Only takes 5mins to hose down the bike anyway.

    Oh ok, I don't have any experience with any of those.
    I keep all my bikes indoors anyway, that probably helps as they will never dry out in a damp shed.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 42,242
    solsurf wrote:
    Just cleaned my bike down with snow, its like the things been polished :)

    If you have no snow and its cold i.e. hose pipe would cause an iced drive I wipe my one down with decrease wipes and then lube.

    Its the salt that is the problem, it really does bugger things up. I do wonder if bike part technology has been left behind. Cars used to rot 20 years ago that was solve but bikes seem to corrode when you look at them :roll:

    I find women melt when I look at them :lol: . Unforunately only in my dreams!
  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    I don't recommend excessive application of Muc Off unless you want dull paint, knackered bearing seals and cracked tyres - better to keep it to the oily bits only IME. I tend to leave the cleaning to after the ride - a good wash down with warm soapy water, making sure to check the condition of the rims, tyres and breaks. Wipe down the chain with rag and WD40, relube if necessary. A 5 hour ride in the snow last weekend left my bike nice'n' shiney! A good session of pre-season maintenance is the best way to minimise problems rather than waiting for problems to arise. The trouble is I have a choice of bikes so often take out a clean one rather than clean a dirty one and end up with 5 manky bikes!
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • redddraggon
    redddraggon Posts: 10,862
    APIII wrote:
    APIII wrote:
    SheffSimon wrote:
    Everything is either sealed bearings or well bedded in grease, so whats to go wrong :)

    In my experience putting away the bike wet with winter road crap, will cause alloy components to corrode - may not be a performance issue, but I'd rather my components didn't look like crap.

    Not my experience, but depends on the quality of the components I guess.

    FSA headsets, most shimano stuff, centaur chainrings, veloce rear mech IME.

    Only takes 5mins to hose down the bike anyway.

    Oh ok, I don't have any experience with any of those.
    I keep all my bikes indoors anyway, that probably helps as they will never dry out in a damp shed.

    Well that definitely helps, my bike in Manchester stops inside all the while and doesn't suffer any corrosion, my bikes in Wales live in the shed and the components seem to last nowhere near as long.
    I like bikes...

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  • jgsi
    jgsi Posts: 5,062
    A cleaned, dry warm bike :D
    however
    this perfect solution marred by
    :evil:
    fill in your own blanks
  • rake
    rake Posts: 3,204
    JGSI wrote:
    A cleaned, dry warm bike :D
    however
    this perfect solution marred by
    :evil:
    fill in your own blanks

    no no no no thats not the way to go. if the bikes warm and you suddenly bring it out into the cold it will contract and crack the paint/carbon. also the different humidity inside might be a problem. :roll:
  • jgsi
    jgsi Posts: 5,062
    Carbon????
    try again
  • /dons flame retardent jacket/

    Baby wipes. I use them for everything... and I also get doe eyed looks from the girls at my local chemist, as they think the 6'4" behemoth is buying actual baby wipes for a baby =D

    If only they knew it was for a bike... (and that the baby was lying in its own feaces.... ok went too far there =P .. )
    exercise.png
  • Escargot
    Escargot Posts: 361
    rake wrote:
    no no no no thats not the way to go. if the bikes warm and you suddenly bring it out into the cold it will contract and crack the paint/carbon. also the different humidity inside might be a problem. :roll:

    I'm not sure that's the case as carbon has an almost zero expansion coefficient. Thus a carbon frame will hardly expand/contract.

    It's true that carbon suffers from moisture desorption (thus causing unwanted distortion) but I can't see this being a problem in the conditions you're speaking of.
  • sandbag
    sandbag Posts: 429
    JGSI wrote:
    A cleaned, dry warm bike is marred by

    MOANING BITCH!
  • rake
    rake Posts: 3,204
    Escargot wrote:
    rake wrote:
    no no no no thats not the way to go. if the bikes warm and you suddenly bring it out into the cold it will contract and crack the paint/carbon. also the different humidity inside might be a problem. :roll:

    I'm not sure that's the case as carbon has an almost zero expansion coefficient. Thus a carbon frame will hardly expand/contract.

    It's true that carbon suffers from moisture desorption (thus causing unwanted distortion) but I can't see this being a problem in the conditions you're speaking of.

    i was just trying to create a problem when there isnt one.it saves the trouble. i store mine inside.
  • softlad
    softlad Posts: 3,513
    morrisje wrote:
    Spray muc-off over everything. Leave for an hour.

    Muc-off and the like contain some fairly hefty chemicals - leaving it on the bike for an hour is excessive and risks corrosion - 10 minutes is usually plenty...
  • morrisje
    morrisje Posts: 507
    I'll bear the 10 mins max, for muc-off, in mind. I suppose that anything that can remove grease can also remove paint over time.
  • 0scar
    0scar Posts: 219
    I'm away for a week and didn't have time for a proper clean before I left but I did degrease and polish the chain - it has a removable link so it's off the bike. I think the chain is the most important bit as it has the most moving parts. This means the RD springs are at rest, rather than stretched. It's in a nice warm flat, but I'm still semi worried that it'll be in a corroded heap when I get back.
    Commuter: Taped-up black Trek 2200 (FCN 5)
    Shiny bike: Pinarello FP2 (FCN 3)
  • stevewj
    stevewj Posts: 227
    Hose down and brush frame, callipers and wheels. Leave to drip dry for 30 mins then spray dry lube on callipers and drivechain.