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New bike, don't like the handlebar set up

tarpaullynntarpaullynn Posts: 146
edited December 2009 in Workshop
I've just bought a new bike, a Revolution Courier Nexus, on the cycle to work scheme. I'd had a test ride and its a totally different bike to my other one which is a Dawes 27spd tourer, the ride is more stretched out rather than the upright comfort of my tourer.

I was happy with the bike, the price and the spec of the bike which was bought as a no fuss cycle for work.

Rode it home from the bike shop today, approx 5.5 miles, and don't like the handlebar set up at all, handlebars need lifting to make the ride more comfortable and the stem set up doesn't allow any adjustment so what are my options? I'm not bothered about taking it back to the shop and quite happy to set the bike up myself.

My options seem to be a stem riser which would give me a couple of inches extra height, an adjustable stem and the fine tuning that would offer or new handlebars with a bit of shape to them rather than the flat bars fitted.

Any advice would be appreciated.

Stemraiser.png

HS870J;Warehouse;Warehouse.jpg
Tarpaullynn

Posts

  • redddraggonredddraggon Posts: 10,862
    Perhaps you just need to get used to lower bars?
    I like bikes...

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  • Bill DBill D Posts: 62
    Many stems have a 'drop' built into them, though it's difficult to see. If yours has and you re-fit it upside down you'll gain about a centimetre in bar height. If you then rotate the bars upwards the hoods will raise about another centimetre. That wouldn't cost you anything, though purists might say that it rather spoils the look of the bike....
  • Bill DBill D Posts: 62
    PS I didn't explain myself very clearly. By a 'drop' I mean that stems are often angled slightly downwards. If you refit them upside down they become angled upwards, thereby raising your bars a bit..
  • k-dogk-dog Posts: 1,652
    Yeah, flipping the stem makes a big difference usually. From the website picture it looks like the stem is already in the upright position so it looks like you need to either use a riser as you said or get a more angled stem.
    I'm left handed, if that matters.
  • geoff_ssgeoff_ss Posts: 1,234
    Perhaps you just need to get used to lower bars?


    Why should he if he finds it uncomfortable? It's for commuting not racing. Should he be a slave to fashion?

    If flipping the extension doesn't offer a reasonable solution (ie too much or too little change) and there's no lee room to move spacers on the steerer tube an adjustable stem is worth trying even if only to discover what fixed stem you need.

    It's one of the disadvantages of modern head sets. With quill stems it's a simple adjustment that can be carried out mid-ride if you wish.

    Geoff
    Old cyclists never die; they just fit smaller chainrings ... and pedal faster
  • redddraggonredddraggon Posts: 10,862
    edited November 2009
    geoff_ss wrote:
    Why should he if he finds it uncomfortable? It's for commuting not racing. Should he be a slave to fashion?

    He was making a judgement after his first ride. It is not unrealistic for a different position to feel strange, especially as it's a different type of bike.

    You wouldn't expect a TT bike to feel as comfortable on a first ride as a Tourer if you'd only rode Tourers - so why expect a racier bike to feel like a Tourer?

    I'm sure after a few rides the OP would start feel more comfortable, it doesn't cost anything to try it out.
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  • maddog 2maddog 2 Posts: 8,114
    I agree with redragon - give it a few rides and see if you can adapt to the new position.

    If it's still wrong then you can fit a more upright stem, but sometimes your brain needs time to adjust to different setups. After a while you can often see the benefits which were not evident initially.

    As for quill stems..... they were rubbish!
    Facts are meaningless, you can use facts to prove anything that's remotely true! - Homer
  • Thanks to all you who've responded, I've had a couple more rides on it and its still not comfortable.

    The problem isn't that my brain needs time to adjust, its just that the 'comfort ring' that I wear around my torso was getting in the way and making riding uncomfortable.

    I've come to the conclusion that being a chubber is okay for keeping the wife warm in bed in the coming months but its absolutely sh*te for a sporty riding position.

    Problem solved now, probably a bit of overkill but I've replaced the stem with an adjustable one and replaced the flat bars with 40mm riser bars, had a ride tonight and its instantly more comfortable.

    My aim now is to lose some weight and hoepfully get the bar gradually lowered back to flat. :)
    Tarpaullynn
  • geoff_ssgeoff_ss Posts: 1,234
    maddog 2 wrote:
    I agree with redragon - give it a few rides and see if you can adapt to the new position.

    If it's still wrong then you can fit a more upright stem, but sometimes your brain needs time to adjust to different setups. After a while you can often see the benefits which were not evident initially.

    As for quill stems..... they were rubbish!

    How were they rubbish? They were used exclusively for 100 years and remained in use when lots of other components were improved. If they were rubbish then I'm sure pro bike riders would have demanded their replacement long ago.

    I used quill stems for many years on single bicycles, tandems and trikes and they were never any sort of problem. I always used Cinelli or 3TTT top quality items. The big advantage of ahead sets is that they are cheap because there's no need to cut a thread on the steerer tube. The big disadvantage is the lack of adjustment once you've cut the steerer to length. I found that being able to raise my 'bars halfway through a New Zealand tour made it possible to continue with a little less neck/shoulder pain.

    As for getting used to low handlebars that's fine if you're young and supple. I coped easily 25 years ago but not, sadly, now. If you're still cycling in 30 or 40 years time you might find a slightly more upright position is necessary. It's the only way I keep cycling at all.

    Geoff
    Old cyclists never die; they just fit smaller chainrings ... and pedal faster
  • maddog 2maddog 2 Posts: 8,114
    How were [quill stems] rubbish?

    because they are heavy, prone to flexing, prone to creaking, prone to getting stuck. The headset needs big spanners to adjust, steerer tubes need to be threaded and made of steel...

    as for pros not demanding a change.... I think you'll find they all have Geoff !

    The ahead system is more limited in terms vertical adjustment I admit. But in every other way it is better. It is lighter, stiffer, allen key adjustment, you can use alu and carbon steerrs and so on.
    Facts are meaningless, you can use facts to prove anything that's remotely true! - Homer
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