What is with roadie cool when it comes to practicalities?

Gesmi
Gesmi Posts: 35
edited November 2009 in Road beginners
Having stripped my bike right down for the end of season hill climbs, I am now strangely reluctant to put back on the saddle bag, bottle cages, etc. Now, I'm as keen as the next person to jump on the obscure roadie cool bandwagon but where did this aversion to saddlebags come from? Putting pumps, tyre levers, spare tubes and even water bottles in back pockets seems an awful faff just to make the bike look less uncluttered. IN a bag they just sit there until needed.......what's going on (or does everyone else have a support car following their training rides?). Any pseudo-scientific rationales out there for this obsession?

:(
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Comments

  • geoff_ss
    geoff_ss Posts: 1,201
    Personally, I've never understood it. All my roads bikes have been touring based and have had mudguard clearance and a saddlebag (a Caradice Camper Longflap was used for commuting and a lot of touring) even though I always used drop handlebars.

    Even my racing bike was a touring frame with a pair of home-built sprints. When I raced my trike I fitted a sprint in the front for psychological reasons :lol: I always carried enough stuff to fix a simple puncture. I just like being self reliant.

    Perhaps times have changed. 25 years ago the regular Saturday morning Winter chain gang that went from Derby via Leicester to Nottingham and back to Derby expected riders to have full mudguards. Most were on lightweight touring bikes and all carried enough tools to get them home because if you got shelled out you were on your own. Racing bikes were kept for racing.

    Geoff
    Old cyclists never die; they just fit smaller chainrings ... and pedal faster
  • bristolpete
    bristolpete Posts: 2,255
    Interesting point.

    I would suggest that for some, its about keeping the clean smooth shape of a new dream bike uncluttered. I can understand that - we work hard for our kit.

    I did 50 miles today with two tubes, a pump, energy gel x 2 and my phone in my rear pocket, but if I do go out with the club I tend to use a saddle back and keep most in there.

    No hard and fast rules, just depends on the mood - but over the winter, fixed lights take precedent on my bike over a saddle bag.
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    It's so when at the cafe stop or when parked up and someone picks it up it feels lighter thus you are a better person.
  • APIII
    APIII Posts: 2,010
    I understand the clean lines thing. I think it also encourages discipline i.e. you are forced to take only what you need. If you've got a saddlebag, you'll fit it. I just take a mobile, small pump, spare innertube and a multitool, oh and some preglued patches just in case. It all fits comfortably in my rear pockets.
  • Flasheart
    Flasheart Posts: 1,278
    NapoleonD wrote:
    It's so when at the cafe stop or when parked up and someone picks it up it feels lighter thus you are a better person.

    You actually let someone else touch your bike :?: *shudder*
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  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    Flasheart wrote:
    NapoleonD wrote:
    It's so when at the cafe stop or when parked up and someone picks it up it feels lighter thus you are a better person.

    You actually let someone else touch your bike :?: *shudder*

    As long as they let me punch them in the jaw afterwards, yes. Yes I do.
  • Garz
    Garz Posts: 1,155
    With your quads I thought the option of kicking them would be more lethal? :)
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    Garz wrote:
    With your quads I thought the option of kicking them would be more lethal? :)

    I don't want to create a Black Hole. Just pain.
  • Garz
    Garz Posts: 1,155
    A poke to the eye or nostril should be sufficient then! :)
  • flasher
    flasher Posts: 1,734
    Would you put a roof rack on a Ferrari?
  • If you are worrying about your 'smooth lines', get a water bottle and fill it with tyre levers, a couple of inner tubes, an allen key set and some patches and cleat nuts. You can then use one of your bottle cages and do away with the saddle pack. The stuff also stays dry and so avoids getting rusty.

    Of course you have to make do with only one active bottle but to be honest how often is it that you ride for more than a couple of hours without passing a shop if you need a fill up. Alternatively, man it up and do 55 miles on one 500ml bottle.
  • Steve_b77
    Steve_b77 Posts: 1,680
    Flasher wrote:
    Would you put a roof rack on a Ferrari?

    Nope but I'd want a team car/support vehicle on any long journeys
  • the stripped down road bike is all about looking like a pro. The pro's don't have "stuff" on their bikes. Look like a pro - ride like a pro... well maybe.
  • the stripped down road bike is all about looking like a pro. The pro's don't have "stuff" on their bikes. Look like a pro - ride like a pro... well maybe.
  • Garz
    Garz Posts: 1,155
    So good he had to say it twice! :lol:
  • nolf
    nolf Posts: 1,287
    Just looks cooler.

    Big saddle bags are not cool. On a century ride (imperial) I'd consider a saddle bag so I had room for food, but they just look so uncool.

    Pump, spare inner, multi tool (has some cash in as well), phone, banana, gel, a key, if doing 100k or more then a nutella sadnwich as well split between a couple of pockets.

    Then 2 500ml water bottles (any bigger = not cool!) on the bike.

    Mudguards are only needed to protect the inferior people behind you, thus unnecessary for proper racers who can sit at the front all day.
    "I hold it true, what'er befall;
    I feel it, when I sorrow most;
    'Tis better to have loved and lost;
    Than never to have loved at all."

    Alfred Tennyson
  • so being self reliant, hydrated and comfortable is less important than looking good?

    Jesus people.... Just to annoy the snobs im ordering 3 more dork discs for every face of spokes, painting my white spesh pink, gettting bright pink lycra and a tutu.

    in all honesty, someone deliberately taking the "look" over anything on a bike might as well buy a fixie and ride around chelsea waiting to be discovered by a fashion magazine.
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  • nolf
    nolf Posts: 1,287
    in all honesty, someone deliberately taking the "look" over anything on a bike might as well buy a fixie and ride around chelsea waiting to be discovered by a fashion magazine.

    You are confusing hipster "fashion" with being cool.

    Thats like comparing the latest in styish shell suits to haute couture.
    "I hold it true, what'er befall;
    I feel it, when I sorrow most;
    'Tis better to have loved and lost;
    Than never to have loved at all."

    Alfred Tennyson
  • redddraggon
    redddraggon Posts: 10,862
    Pros tend to also ride with rather empty pockets, and I try to keep my pockets as empty as possible.

    I always ride with a small saddle bag containing tube+multitool+tyre levers. Then in theory all I need in my pockets is a pump (but normally also carry a phone+a little cash).

    But when training pros tend to carry the extra stuff too, Cav's Scott:

    Picture_001alt.jpg

    Complete with Saddle bag and frame pump.
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  • Gesmi
    Gesmi Posts: 35
    Thank you all for your insights. I must admit, I agree with the poster who observes that, although the pros don't carry a pump on their frame in a race, neither do they actually have jersey pockets bulging with anything more than a gel or two as far as I can tell........

    I guess that there's a weight saving by not having pump clips or saddlebags.......
  • teagar
    teagar Posts: 2,100
    Might be worth having a look at what the pros use to train on when they're out training on their own.

    I imagine it's a fair bit more similar to what the average non-sportsman goes out training on, than their race bikes.

    When I rode with a support van I never had to carry anything other than a bit of emergency food, an inner tube and one bottle.
    Note: the above post is an opinion and not fact. It might be a lie.
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    the stripped down road bike is all about looking like a pro. The pro's don't have "stuff" on their bikes. Look like a pro - ride like a pro... well maybe.

    Even the pros bung mudguards on their bikes in the winter. 6 hour rides with a wet bum day in day out isnt fun.
  • redddraggon
    redddraggon Posts: 10,862
    cougie wrote:
    Even the pros bung mudguards on their bikes in the winter. 6 hour rides with a wet bum day in day out isnt fun.

    Aye:

    http://twitter.com/bradwiggins/status/5972957790
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  • Meds1962
    Meds1962 Posts: 391
    I used to take nothing at all on local solo rides unless it fitted in my pockets. Started carrying more stuff in a small saddle bag on longer club runs, not very good if you break down or puncture travelling light if everyone else has come prepared.
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  • Velonutter
    Velonutter Posts: 2,437
    I carry a small clip on Fizik Bag that holds: -

    Inner tube
    A few innertube patches
    3 16g CO2 Cartridges
    Air nozzle for above
    2 Tyre Levers
    BBB Multi tool

    In my back pockets I will carry, Phone, credit card, cash, 1 gel, 1 protein/carb bar, glasses, hanky and sometimes keys depending on whether anyone will be home or not when I get back.

    On my bike I have to Carbon Cages, that I managed to win off flea bay new for $1 !!! Upto 40 miles I carry one 750ml bottle and over that two.

    If you look at any of the pro's their back pockets are full to overflowing and when a support car comes by for feeding they will fill them all up again, typically a pro will consume up to 8 litres of water, 3-5 gels, 3-5 protein/carb bars in a normal TDF stage.
  • hodsgod
    hodsgod Posts: 226
    My saddle bag never leaves my bike, nor does the mini pump which is attached to the bottle cage bolts.
  • hammerite
    hammerite Posts: 3,408
    All this talk about repair kits and food in back pockets over a saddle bag, but where do people put a jacket/gilet/arm or knee warmers?

    Granted this time of year you'll probably go out dressed for the weather, but given our unpredicatable summer, on days when it could do anything I tend to carry a gilet and/or arm warmers most of the time on longer rides. Doesn't leave a lot of space for repair kit, money, keys, phone and food.
  • Gesmi
    Gesmi Posts: 35
    Hammerite - my point exactly! Perhaps the cool cyclist puts his gilet in the (empty) saddle bag....... 8)
  • will3
    will3 Posts: 2,173
    hodsgod wrote:
    My saddle bag never leaves my bike, nor does the mini pump which is attached to the bottle cage bolts.

    Me too. That way I don;t forget stuff/have to faff around searching for it
  • I have a lovely little Bontrager saddle bag that holds spare tubes, tyre irons, patches, multi-tool and cable ties. It's on all the time so I don't forget anything when I go out. Pump mounted alongside bottle cage, again so I don't forget it. My pockets usually contain a banana, cheese and an eccles cake, and on longer runs money, cards, compass, maps and rain gear.