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The new bike gadgetry thread

lost_in_thoughtlost_in_thought Posts: 10,563
edited November 2009 in Commuting chat
For the discerning folk of the commuting forum I propose this new gadgetry:

http://www.flybikesbmx.com/en/news/post_1001

Sure, it's for BMX, but your thoughts? It's quite clever...

Posts

  • jongingejonginge Posts: 5,945
    Ooh. SS/FGers will never need their 15mm spanner again...
    FCN 2-4 "Shut up legs", Jens Voigt
    Planet-x Scott
    Rides
  • Wallace1492Wallace1492 Posts: 3,707
    Indeed, quite clever, but what is the performance level? I mean, is it better than a full tube? Can see benefit in races though.... could be good as a spare when on the road, but how much time will it really save.
    "Encyclopaedia is a fetish for very small bicycles"
  • jongingejonginge Posts: 5,945
    So, these have caught my eye over the last couple of months. I don't need either but...

    Cute power meter:
    http://www.cyclingnews.com/features/on- ... 09-part-15
    http://www.metrigear.com/products/

    Garmin 500:
    https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=160&pID=36728
    It's like the 705 (but no mapping), only much smaller. Think of the aero gains...
    FCN 2-4 "Shut up legs", Jens Voigt
    Planet-x Scott
    Rides
  • mooniomoonio Posts: 802
    For the discerning folk of the commuting forum I propose this new gadgetry:

    http://www.flybikesbmx.com/en/news/post_1001

    Sure, it's for BMX, but your thoughts? It's quite clever...

    I've used a similar tube on my bike, you used to be able to get them from Halfords, they were fine to use and really quick to change etc

    Here they are

    http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/product-SJSC ... -11126.htm
  • spasypaddyspasypaddy Posts: 5,179
    JonGinge wrote:
    So, these have caught my eye over the last couple of months. I don't need either but...

    Cute power meter:
    http://www.cyclingnews.com/features/on- ... 09-part-15
    http://www.metrigear.com/products/

    Garmin 500:
    https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=160&pID=36728
    It's like the 705 (but no mapping), only much smaller. Think of the aero gains...
    well thats me probably getting that power meter then...
  • tailwindhometailwindhome Posts: 18,148
    Re Those tubes

    I must be having an especially slow day as it took a while to figure out what the big deal was :oops:

    Presumably the wheel still needs to come off to remove a traditional style tube from the wheel

    Or have I got this totally wrong?
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  • AidyAidy Posts: 2,015
    I've always wondered why there wasn't a tube with a break in it.
    I've been half tempted to bodge one every now and then, just to see if it would work.

    The whole linking thing is clever, though. However, I'm still not sure it's entirely necessary - I reckon pressure and expansion of a closed end tube would be sufficient to stop any nastiness of uneven inflation.
  • AidyAidy Posts: 2,015
    Presumably the wheel still needs to come off to remove a traditional style tube from the wheel

    Or have I got this totally wrong?

    If you were in a rush, you'd just cut it.
  • if you don't link the ends, then the rotation of the tyre will cause the tube to process a lot.
  • AidyAidy Posts: 2,015
    if you don't link the ends, then the rotation of the tyre will cause the tube to process a lot.

    Do you mean precess?

    I don't see why it would affect an unjoined tube any more than it would a joined tube.
  • jongingejonginge Posts: 5,945
    if you don't link the ends, then the rotation of the tyre will cause the tube to process a lot.
    I concur*. Ever ridden for a while with a flat tube? I'm not sure pressure alone would keep it in place.

    * not about the spelling
    FCN 2-4 "Shut up legs", Jens Voigt
    Planet-x Scott
    Rides
  • AidyAidy Posts: 2,015
    JonGinge wrote:
    if you don't link the ends, then the rotation of the tyre will cause the tube to process a lot.
    I concur*. Ever ridden for a while with a flat tube? I'm not sure pressure alone would keep it in place.

    * not about the spelling

    ... but surely that backs it up, if anything.

    It precesses with a flat tube because the pressure isn't keeping it in place. Despite the fact that it's a unbroken circular tube.

    However, that example does bring up a good point. What happens if you get a sudden puncture with an unjoined tube? I'd suspect it would be all kinds of bad.
  • Yes, sorry 2 hours sleep and been up since 6 :shock:

    In a joined tube it does happen but the tension keeps it to a minimum, if you had a non fixed end (ie without the valve) it would rapidly work back round because of the tension in the rubber, and the rotational direction.
  • mooniomoonio Posts: 802
    mine had overlapping ends
  • Halfords sacked them as they didn't prove popular. TBH this one seems as faffy as a couple of seconds with the spanner to pop the wheel off and put a standard tube on.
  • AidyAidy Posts: 2,015
    Halfords sacked them as they didn't prove popular. TBH this one seems as faffy as a couple of seconds with the spanner to pop the wheel off and put a standard tube on.

    My pondering was mainly based off of having played with hub gears.

    Hopping the rear wheel off a hub geared bike to change the tube is completely the biggest pain in the posterior.
  • don_dondon_don Posts: 1,007
    Convenient, but tubeless is the way forward. Inner tubes are anachronistic pieces of junk that deserve extinction. IMHO...
  • Aidy wrote:
    Halfords sacked them as they didn't prove popular. TBH this one seems as faffy as a couple of seconds with the spanner to pop the wheel off and put a standard tube on.

    My pondering was mainly based off of having played with hub gears.

    Hopping the rear wheel off a hub geared bike to change the tube is completely the biggest pain in the posterior.

    I ride on an Alfine hub, changing the rear is a piece of P***

    lever off 1 side of the tyre and pull the dead tube completely out

    undo the nuts and lift the wheel just enough to slip the tube over the axle and past the dropouts same for slipping the new tube in.

    put the wheel back in place and tighten the nuts again,

    feed the new tube onto the rim, remount the 1 side of the tyre

    inflate and away.

    I've never had a pinch puncture after replacing like this and can change a tube and be on my way in a few minutes.

    and all without the joys of getting oily from unhooking deraillures
  • don_don wrote:
    Convenient, but tubeless is the way forward. Inner tubes are anachronistic pieces of junk that deserve extinction. IMHO...


    +600000000000000000000000

    it's awesome, going to convert my pompino when i get new wheels for it, and do my ss xc bike when the spokes arrive!
  • FeynmanCFeynmanC Posts: 649
    Ok - dumb question. How do the tubeless work? What happens if you get a puncture?
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  • FeynmanC wrote:
    Ok - dumb question. How do the tubeless work? What happens if you get a puncture?

    for pinch flats aka snake bites there is no inner to rupture. for thorns etc they tend to have fluid like slime, seems to work better with mtbs than roadies.
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