On-One reason for buying?

misterdun
misterdun Posts: 91
edited November 2009 in MTB buying advice
Do most people who buy these frames tend to whack on their spare parts and (by the sound of it) super long forks? I have been looking at the sight and fancy the idea of buying an In-bred frame and swapping the parts off my current (and only) bike. I only have 100mm forks at the moment, am I missing the point of On-One frames or are they good as a main bike?

Comments

  • dave_hill
    dave_hill Posts: 3,877
    misterdun wrote:
    Do most people who buy these frames tend to whack on their spare parts and (by the sound of it) super long forks? I have been looking at the sight and fancy the idea of buying an In-bred frame and swapping the parts off my current (and only) bike. I only have 100mm forks at the moment, am I missing the point of On-One frames or are they good as a main bike?

    On-Ones have a very cult following. They are a perfectly capable frame which are ideal for general use and whilst they don't do anything spectacularly well they don't do anything spectacularly bad, either.

    I think that you've misunderstood the application of them too. The four main On-One frames (Inbred, 456, Summer Season and Scandal) are all quite different.

    The Scandal is a lightweight scandium frame which is equally at home as a race bike or lightweight trail iron.

    The Summer Season is a budget, no-frills, fairly slack "playing" frame. Great for chucking about in silly situations or as a pub bike.

    The Inbred and 456 are very closely linked. They are definitely general purpose frames which won't win any prizes for lightness or good looks (maybe) but they are very, very capable all-rounders. The Inbred can cope with a maximum fork travel of 5 inches (125mm) while the 456 is designed to cope with any fork from 4" travel to 6" travel (hence 4-5-6). I would call any of those "super long".

    If I was in the market for a do-it-all steel hardtail as my main ride, an Inbred or a 456 would be very high on the list.
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  • Many thanks for the advice, food for thought!!
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    i think the on ones deserve a place as anyones main bike, they seem pretty good and folk love them.

    i think the reason they seem to be popping up as spare parts bikes is that for the money, theyre a brilliant place to keep your spare parts nice and tidy so you know where they are if you need them, think of them like a mug tree but for bike parts.

    only joking, they are more and more popular because people like me owned one.

    only joking again, they are more popular because they are really good and for once, it represents a bike frame which does a brilliant job without costing much and the low price means they are worth a punt even if the owner ends up not liking it. also their seemingly cult following means that if you do decide to sell the frame on, they depreciate too much which helps take the risk out of buying one in the first place.
  • rowlers
    rowlers Posts: 1,614
    Think I'm going to get one, purely as a cheap way to see what all the "steel" fuss is about.
    I'm going to swap what bits I can of my maxlight, run the 456 over winter, and then decide which I prefer.
    I'll sell on the frame which I decide against.
  • ravey1981
    ravey1981 Posts: 1,111
    I have just bought one as I wanted a nice hardtail to compliment my fs. I feel that fs has made my riding technique a bit lazy ie letting the bike do the work instead of picking good lines etc.

    I chose the inbred as it is extremely good value and is well rated. I had looked at a cotic soul and although the cotic is a nicer frame it isn't imo worth the extra £350, especially as I'm building it as a second bike in effect.

    Just had to send the inbred frame back as I ordered the wrong size but i cant wait to get building and riding it :)