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'Dodgy' Leg and Clipless Pedals

Caligari_ukCaligari_uk Posts: 186
edited September 2009 in Road beginners
Hi guys.

For a few months now I've been getting an annoying pain around my
left hip area (and to the side of my stomach).

I've always had a bit of a 'dodgy' left foot, due to it having
absolutely no arch. This means that over the years my foot (and seemingly the whole of my leg) has decided that it's more comfortable if it all turns slightly to the left when I'm standing up (no - my real name is not John Merrick).

I've been to see the doctor about it, and he said that this is possibly causing
'muscle tenderness' on my side that will come and go - but to be honest, it
doesn't seem to be going anywhere at the mo.

I had a quick google around on the Internet the other day and discovered that this kind of pain can also be linked to the use of clipless pedals - which probably aren't a great idea anyway if I have a bit of a 'cuckoo' leg.

I'm removing the cleats from my cycling shoes today (boo!) to see how I get on (luckily the pedals have a rather large platform anyway) - but do you think it's worth me at least being able to 'clip in' on my 'good side'? CAN you actually cycle with only one foot clipped in?

Sorry for the rather long and rambling post, by the way! :)

Posts

  • I think cycling clipped in on one side would lead to an unbalanced and probably uncomfortable ride!
  • FlasheartFlasheart Posts: 1,278
    I reckon it would feel alkward. A bit like when you push off from the lights and still have one foot not clipped in (not a nice feeling) But that could be just me.
    Strange, I ride my urban/hybrid Ridgeback Supernova to work every day without being clipped in to the SPD clips on the underside of the pedals. I get home and switch over to my road bike and clip in to my Look Keo's and I feel strangely safer and secure on the bike. :?
    The universal aptitude for ineptitude makes any human accomplishment an incredible miracle. ...Stapp’s Ironical Paradox Law
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  • Being clipped in on one side intuitively feels like a bad idea - the imbalance of the dynamics.

    I too have flat feet and recently went to see a NHS podiatrist who happened to be a keen cyclist. He prescribed some orthotics for my shoes to stop the pronation. He said that pronating would be more of an issue walking where you 'strike' the ground rather than on a bike pedalling. But orthotics/podiatry might be worth exploring. My other suggestions would be see a good sports physio.
    .
    "Let not the sands of time get in your lunch"

    National Lampoon
  • maybe get some cleats with float so you can at least have a bit of movement.
  • Thanks for the replies, guys.

    At the moment I'm still using MTB style clip-in pedals without the cleats - which isn't too bad. It's just annoying when you foot suddenly lifts off when you're trying to get yourself up a long steep hill.

    @ Macondo - did you have to ask your doctor to refer you to an NHS 'podiatrist'? I really need something to stop my ankle from rolling over.

    @ 211dave112 - could you possibly offer up a little more info in regards to cleats with float? That actually sounds pretty promising.
  • sovedasoveda Posts: 306
    Thanks for the replies, guys.

    At the moment I'm still using MTB style clip-in pedals without the cleats - which isn't too bad. It's just annoying when you foot suddenly lifts off when you're trying to get yourself up a long steep hill.

    @ Macondo - did you have to ask your doctor to refer you to an NHS 'podiatrist'? I really need something to stop my ankle from rolling over.

    @ 211dave112 - could you possibly offer up a little more info in regards to cleats with float? That actually sounds pretty promising.

    MTB style cleats have cleats with float allready.
    Have you looked at the angle of the cleats? having them turned so that "neutral" matches what your foot wants to do naturally could help.
  • soveda wrote:
    Thanks for the replies, guys.

    At the moment I'm still using MTB style clip-in pedals without the cleats - which isn't too bad. It's just annoying when you foot suddenly lifts off when you're trying to get yourself up a long steep hill.

    @ Macondo - did you have to ask your doctor to refer you to an NHS 'podiatrist'? I really need something to stop my ankle from rolling over.

    @ 211dave112 - could you possibly offer up a little more info in regards to cleats with float? That actually sounds pretty promising.

    MTB style cleats have cleats with float allready.
    Have you looked at the angle of the cleats? having them turned so that "neutral" matches what your foot wants to do naturally could help.

    Thanks Soveda - I'll give that a try.
  • Hi - yes saw my gp and he referred me to Podiatry. The referral was to help my back as poor arches can contribute to back problems.

    I would also ask to see a physio or if you can afford it see someone privately.

    Muscle tenderness is a vague diagnosis - which muscles? why are they tender? which muscles are weak/strong? There's a reason behind for your discomfort and it really needs proper investigation. I urge you to get it sorted and remain active.
    .
    "Let not the sands of time get in your lunch"

    National Lampoon
  • Macondo01 wrote:
    Hi - yes saw my gp and he referred me to Podiatry. The referral was to help my back as poor arches can contribute to back problems.

    I would also ask to see a physio or if you can afford it see someone privately.

    Muscle tenderness is a vague diagnosis - which muscles? why are they tender? which muscles are weak/strong? There's a reason behind for your discomfort and it really needs proper investigation. I urge you to get it sorted and remain active.

    Thanks for the advice, Macondo. I think I'll make an appointment with my GP to see if I can get referred.

    Funnily enough I remember getting some proper arch supports made for me when I was a kid (having my feet encased in plaster was a strange experience), but I think I only ever bothered using them for about half a year.
  • ...also, just out of interest.

    What pedal / shoe combination would you guys recommend if I needed to buy something that allowed a little more 'float'?
  • Heard good reviews on here of the Time RXS pedal/cleat.

    As a kid my gp gave me exercises to pick up pencils with my toes. Never did my arches any good and hardly anything I can put on my cv :shock:
    .
    "Let not the sands of time get in your lunch"

    National Lampoon
  • sovedasoveda Posts: 306
    Time or Crank Bros pedals probably.
  • kfinlaykfinlay Posts: 763
    You could also try Specialized Body Geometry shoes - I use the MTB Expert shoes on my MTB and road bikes as I can't afford 2 pairs and have Crank Bros Candy pedals on each bike. They do give a bit of float depending on which way you attached the cleats and also you can get different types of insoles which may also help. Maybe an idea to speak to a Specialized dealer but agree with others about trying to get specialist professional help, good luck mate :)
    Kev

    Summer Bike: Colnago C60
    Winter Bike: Vitus Alios
    MTB: 1997 GT Karakorum
  • mikeqmikeq Posts: 141
    For a few months now I've been getting an annoying pain around my
    left hip area (and to the side of my stomach).

    I've always had a bit of a 'dodgy' left foot, due to it having
    absolutely no arch. This means that over the years my foot (and seemingly the whole of my leg) has decided that it's more comfortable if it all turns slightly to the left when I'm standing up (no - my real name is not John Merrick).

    Hi,

    Sounds like the muscles in your hip/butt area have adaptively shortened over the years (actually only takes couple of weeks for a muscle to adaptively shorten), while others will be in constant stretch. With the effect that when using clipless pedal your leg will be pulled around into a 'normal' position, therefore stretching the relevant muscles and as you have experienced causing pain, they may even being in spasm.

    The muscles I am talking about will mainly be Gluteus Med and Min, Piriformis and Tensor Fascia Latae. Look up the web for stretches for these muscles and preform couple of times a day, and before and after cycling.

    Go see a sports therapist to confirm, massage and give you a plan for treatment.

    Go get orthortics to sort out that foot.
    Cycling from Glasgow to Paris to raise funds for Asthma UK

    www.velochallenge.org
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