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Seat Height ???

badbackbadback Posts: 31
edited September 2009 in Road beginners
Can anyone tell me the correct seat height in terms of leg length.

I've always understood that the pedal at its lowest point of arc and foot clipped in my heal flexes slightly below the pedal with my leg straight. If that makes sense.

Does this ring true?

Posts

  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,601
    badback wrote:
    Can anyone tell me the correct seat height in terms of leg length.

    I've always understood that the pedal at its lowest point of arc and foot clipped in my heal flexes slightly below the pedal with my leg straight. If that makes sense.

    Does this ring true?

    There is a theory that goes as follows. Sitting on the bike, in your bike shoes, put one HEEL on the pedal, rotate the crank to it's bottom position. At this point(heel on pedal)
    your leg should be straight but not completely locked out at the knee. This will cause
    you knee to have a slight bend when you clip in. You do not want your knees to lock out
    or your leg to be fully extended when you are pedaling. This wastes power and screws up your cadence. In any case a slight bend in the knee(while pedaling) is good. Maybe 10 degrees or so.This is just a starting point but will get you close. I'm sure others will chime in with their ideas.
  • ric7481ric7481 Posts: 103
    Just had an hour and a half basic bike fitting at reputable LBS....has def. made all the difference to av. speed, comfort on bike and recovery....

    This is what I was told - when sat on bike pedalling - your knee should end up between 20 and 30 degrees at bottom dead centre..mine is set closer to the 30 due to knee injuries.

    also the fore/aft positioning of saddle is equally important to ensure you are correctly over the pedal....with the crank at the 3 o'clock position, a plumb line hung from the axis point of your knee should be pretty much over the pedal bearing.............this and the 30 degree knee flex has really helped my riding and comfort.
  • google cycle fitting and spend a while reading up on it then keep going out and making minor adjustments. That's what I did. Recently got a new bike mail order and I'm still tweaking. You'll know if it's wrong as it'll hurt.....
    Or if you're lazy - take it to LBS and pay for fitting.
  • ric7481ric7481 Posts: 103
    edited September 2009
    SOLSTICE21 wrote:
    You'll know if it's wrong as it'll hurt...............Or if you're lazy - take it to LBS and pay for fitting.


    Did lots of reading on net - much of it conflicting :? ......very hard to measure leg angles, view body position etc. when on own......LBS charged me £20... :) (They actually know what they are doing as opposed to just reading about it )which for an hour and a half twiddling this, twiddling that , pedal on the turbo trainer, fiddle again was well worth it in my lazy opinion...and probably much quicker than riding, stopping,adjusting, riding, stopping, adjusting etc.....leaving me more time to get out and pedal..........have been able to transfer most of the basic measurements to my MTB aswell, which has improved comfort and performance off-road :D

    If it hurts - potentially you are already damaging yourself :!: You may recover when you're younger, however cycling is such a repetitive exercise, that any damage caused by a particular movement is very quickly compounded......I moved to cycling from motorbike racing to cut down on injury - not increase it...hence a bike fit.

    Would you run a marathon in trainers a size to small ? Would you wear a crash helmet a size too big ?.......Get it fitted - it costs peanuts and potentially saves you alot of pain and aggro further down the line.....how much fitting you have is up to you......as I said, I paid £20 which I feel is incredibly good value given the difference its made - you can pay £120 upwards, but guess it depends where you are on the cycling for fun / amateur / pro curve ?
  • there are no hard and fast rules.

    People are all different and have different issues such as flexibility and past injuries.

    Your best bet is to look at the internet stuff, try some bits and keep a notebook of setup stuff to give you a vaguely sensible idea of what actually works for you. Try to only make small adjustments and only one at a time.
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