Unprepared Cyclists

Flasheart
Flasheart Posts: 1,278
edited September 2009 in Road beginners
On our return journey this morning my mate and I came accross a young lady pushing her bike along the side of the road in the opposite direction to us. Rather than my witty "it goes faster if you ride it" comment I was ready to say (and smile) as we pass, I called out and enquired if she was okay. She called back that she had a flat tyre..so we stopped.
Now Pete and I live in the New Forest..that means we have vast expanses of no habitation. This lass in her 20's had been with group doing a 100km ride. Her friends had kept on pedalling on unaware that she had a flat tyre and by this stage a couple of miles ahead. She had no pump, no repair kit, no water, no food,no mobile phone...just her and a MTB with a flat tyre and a good 8-10 miles from any civilisation.

Long story short (okay I lied) Pete stayed with her and fixed her tyre but we couldn't pump it up due to her Shraeder valves vs our Presta pumps.(no they are presta only pumps) while I took off back down the road in search of her friends. I found them about 2 1/2 miles down the road (they fitted the description supplied). I explained the story and called Pete on his phone and we both handed the phones over to them to speak to each other.
I then headed back to where Pete & Jill (her name) were, with one of the guys following behind me. I of course blew him away as he was on a MTB with knobblies (couldn't resist it)
When her friend eventually arrived, Pete and I pedalled off on our journey after giving her some advice about carrying what you need. I was amazed that someone would head out into such an unfamiliar remote area with absolutly nothing like that.

If we hadn't have stopped to help and something had happened to her we would have had to live with it. You just never know. :roll:
The universal aptitude for ineptitude makes any human accomplishment an incredible miracle. ...Stapp’s Ironical Paradox Law
FCN3
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http://lonelymiddlesomethingguy.blogspot.com/
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Comments

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    I would have left her trailing in my wake as I crushed her with my enormous display of Quad Power.

    You know, toughen her up a bit.
  • kingrollo
    kingrollo Posts: 3,198
    See this quite a lot , not actually stranded cyclists , but cyclists with no pump, tubes etc. I think its only when you've been cycling a while you realize what you need to be prepared - I never venture out without tube, pump, mobile now........but I did have to learn the hard way !!!!!!


    (you not managed to get out today Napd - all that pent up fustration ?)
  • hopper1
    hopper1 Posts: 4,389
    kingrollo wrote:
    See this quite a lot , not actually stranded cyclists , but cyclists with no pump, tubes etc. I think its only when you've been cycling a while you realize what you need to be prepared - I never venture out without tube, pump, mobile now........but I did have to learn the hard way !!!!!!


    (you not managed to get out today Napd - all that pent up fustration ?)

    Ha, ha, ha..... :wink:
    Start with a budget, finish with a mortgage!
  • Anonymous
    Anonymous Posts: 79,667
    Heh heh, I'm currently stuck in the dungeon at Manchester Airport :(

    I've not even managed a Tabata session the last couple of days :(:(

    I've a feeling I'll be eating my own words next Sunday :(:(:(
  • hopper1
    hopper1 Posts: 4,389
    NapoleonD wrote:
    Heh heh, I'm currently stuck in the dungeon at Manchester Airport :(

    I've not even managed a Tabata session the last couple of days :(:(

    I've a feeling I'll be eating my own words next Sunday :(:(:(

    I'v not trained since last Sunday and wont get home till Friday night (11th), so I'll probably be blowing out of my a*se on Sunday, too... Before it gets hilly :shock:
    Start with a budget, finish with a mortgage!
  • freehub
    freehub Posts: 4,257
    First ride I did I was very unprepared, I had lycra shorts on, I had tshirt and fleece on, new helmet, big backpack with banana, inner tube, no tyre levers or pump.
  • When I was young, I bought an old Triumph Spitfire because I thought a retro convertible would be cool. I learned that it is important to carry tools and know how to use them. And that British cars from the 1970s were sh1t.
  • There was some discussion once on a CTC run about the new young chap cycling in Barbour jacket, jeans and brogues and what he might have in the massive rucksack which hid his head from behind. I suggested it was full of polystyrene as an effort to psyche us out.

    When he had a puncture though (nearly) all was revealed when from the depths he pulled out a track pump. The rest was revealed at the drum up when he brought out a hard briefcase full of sandwiches etc.

    Can't say he wasn't prepared.
  • We were out on our regular thursday night after work mountain bike ride when we bumped into a roadie pushing his bike. I asked him if he was okay and he said his chain had broken aboout a mile down the hill and he had no tools to fix it. I volunteered to ride down the hill and find it for him (i carry spare links and a chain tool) but when he told me that he'd thrown it into a field i gave up and left him to it.
    He only had another ten miles to walk to get home!
  • skinson
    skinson Posts: 362
    If they can't be arsed to prepare for their ride properly then I'm afraid it's a case of just ride on by.....I have no qualms about doing that..
    Dave
  • skinson wrote:
    If they can't be arsed to prepare for their ride properly then I'm afraid it's a case of just ride on by.....I have no qualms about doing that..
    Dave

    Classy guy
    FCN 10
    Member of Hybrids Anonymous
  • dilemna
    dilemna Posts: 2,187
    Flasheart wrote:
    On our return journey this morning my mate and I came accross a young lady pushing her bike along the side of the road in the opposite direction to us. Rather than my witty "it goes faster if you ride it" comment I was ready to say (and smile) as we pass, I called out and enquired if she was okay. She called back that she had a flat tyre..so we stopped.
    Now Pete and I live in the New Forest..that means we have vast expanses of no habitation. This lass in her 20's had been with group doing a 100km ride. Her friends had kept on pedalling on unaware that she had a flat tyre and by this stage a couple of miles ahead. She had no pump, no repair kit, no water, no food,no mobile phone...just her and a MTB with a flat tyre and a good 8-10 miles from any civilisation.

    Long story short (okay I lied) Pete stayed with her and fixed her tyre but we couldn't pump it up due to her Shraeder valves vs our Presta pumps.(no they are presta only pumps) while I took off back down the road in search of her friends. I found them about 2 1/2 miles down the road (they fitted the description supplied). I explained the story and called Pete on his phone and we both handed the phones over to them to speak to each other.
    I then headed back to where Pete & Jill (her name) were, with one of the guys following behind me. I of course blew him away as he was on a MTB with knobblies (couldn't resist it)
    When her friend eventually arrived, Pete and I pedalled off on our journey after giving her some advice about carrying what you need. I was amazed that someone would head out into such an unfamiliar remote area with absolutly nothing like that.

    If we hadn't have stopped to help and something had happened to her we would have had to live with it. You just never know. :roll:

    A damsel in distress. Captain Flasheart never one to miss an opportunity. Just when she needs a knight in shining armour two turn up at once. Was she fit? Did she give you her name and number? A 100km maiden ride on an MTB with knobblies - painful. I bet she abandoned.

    I suppose you'll be wanting a medal now so watch this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qkSe4YM ... re=related
    Life is like a roll of toilet paper; long and useful, but always ends at the wrong moment. Anon.
    Think how stupid the average person is.......
    half of them are even more stupid than you first thought.
  • .....And don't let the person you're helping use your pump. Do the pumping yourself. Some nitwit finally did my cherished and trusty 20yr old Zefal HPX pump in by breaking the pump head off with his valve stem imbedded in it of course. That was about the 5th time someone broke my pump after I stopped to help. I was planning on being cremated with that pump but I guess the Zefal will recieve a premature farewell. :evil:
  • Flasheart
    Flasheart Posts: 1,278
    dilemna wrote:
    A damsel in distress. Captain Flasheart never one to miss an opportunity. Just when she needs a knight in shining armour two turn up at once. Was she fit? Did she give you her name and number? A 100km maiden ride on an MTB with knobblies - painful. I bet she abandoned.

    Mutley hehe
    Fit yes, name & number no ..don't think either of our Wives at home would appreciated that. From what I gathered from the phone conversation they were having , somebody was going to come out and pick her up in a car. Abandoned ..yup

    She wasn't the only person we stopped for yesterday either. A couple of roadies were off the side of the road fixing a bike. One of them had slashed his tyre on a stone. We asked if they were tooled up and they said yes. Another roadie that had passed earlier had given him a tyre boot to repair the tyre. He said he a had a pile of tyre boots at home.
    I commented "won't do a lot of good there mate" and he laughingly agreed.
    The universal aptitude for ineptitude makes any human accomplishment an incredible miracle. ...Stapp’s Ironical Paradox Law
    FCN3
    http://img87.yfrog.com/img87/336/mycubeb.jpg
    http://lonelymiddlesomethingguy.blogspot.com/
  • ... we've got good samaritans, pontius pilates and all sorts in this thread..... even the mighty one put in an appearance.....from the dungeons of Manchester Airport........all good stuff

    well done Flasheart and Pete....it'll soon be worth wearing underpants over the bibshorts...ready for the next emergency (but where do you find a telephone box in the New Forest?)
  • When I was young, I bought an old Triumph Spitfire because I thought a retro convertible would be cool. I learned that it is important to carry tools and know how to use them. And that MG, Austin and Morris cars from the 1970s were sh1t.

    Retro: never cool, vintage/classic: always! And as I have just learned, carrying a fire extinguisher under the driver's seat for 10yrs in the event it might one day be useful is also v important. Now, I gotta find a way of putting one on the bike because you just never know!

    BTW, your statement about Brit cars is now correct :wink:
  • Flasheart
    Flasheart Posts: 1,278
    I suppose you could set it up to fire off when you overtake someone, leaving them in a cloud wondering what the hell just went by :wink:
    The universal aptitude for ineptitude makes any human accomplishment an incredible miracle. ...Stapp’s Ironical Paradox Law
    FCN3
    http://img87.yfrog.com/img87/336/mycubeb.jpg
    http://lonelymiddlesomethingguy.blogspot.com/
  • skinson
    skinson Posts: 362
    Classy guy

    Ah! So your the person who stops every time you see a car broken down at the side of the road? The guy who lets people go before you in supermarket queues? The guy who gets up on a bus to give your seat to someone else? The guy who allows a person in a pub to get served before you? The guy who...............................I know who you are! you're the good Samaritan.....Well, well done you, give yourself a big pat on the back..
    Dave :roll:
  • cjw
    cjw Posts: 1,889
    Rockhopper wrote:
    He only had another ten miles to walk to get home!

    That sent a shiver down my spine. Imagine a 10 mile walk in SPD-SL shoes :shock:

    As a few others, if I see a bike on the side of the road or trail I'll always check if they're OK. Only time someone needed help was about a year ago where a chap had a broken chain and had no idea what to do. I fixed it for him with a SRAM link and chain tool.
    London to Paris Forum
    http://cjwoods.com/london2paris

    Scott Scale 10
    Focus Izalco Team
  • boondog
    boondog Posts: 205
    my work colleague has just bought a bike, I questioned his lack of pump/spare tube/repair kit/levers/.... , and he said he didn't have slicks so he wouldn't be getting punctures.
    :D
  • pneumatic
    pneumatic Posts: 1,989
    skinson wrote:
    Classy guy

    Ah! So your the person who stops every time you see a car broken down at the side of the road? The guy who lets people go before you in supermarket queues? The guy who gets up on a bus to give your seat to someone else? The guy who allows a person in a pub to get served before you? The guy who...............................I know who you are! you're the good Samaritan.....Well, well done you, give yourself a big pat on the back..
    Dave :roll:

    Are you the guy who was standing next to me at St Pancras last Friday night waiting for the already packed local service to arrive? When the doors opened right opposite me, he stuck an elbow in my face and made to board the train.

    Did I turn the other cheek? F&$k no! I took out his kneecaps with a briefcase full of documents and shouldered him into the sliding door!

    God, I hate London manners. They're contagious! :D


    Fast and Bulbous
    Peregrinations
    Eddingtons: 80 (Metric); 60 (Imperial)

  • i think most of us learnt the hard way, it's just human nature, and were poorly prepared when we started. you don't really understand what goes wrong until it has. i never carried a tyre boot until i split a tyre and never carried tubes until i tried to repair a puncture in winter. so i always stop to ask. i wouldn't stop for a car though as i don't see that not joining the AA is the same thing as not having much clue a bout a bike when you start doing it.
  • Porgy
    Porgy Posts: 4,525
    I used to go out with nothing more than a credit card or a pocket of cash until I'd been cycling (>30 miles) for about 10 years.

    I only got caught out once - cycling from Plymouth to Paignton as a kid - a puncture about half way home on the A38 - I had to phone my dad to come and get me - always carried 10 pences for the phone in those days.

    With age comes caution - now I probably carry too much.
  • I saw a load of them in South Buckinghamshire this sunday. You know the type AGNI lovely, high end bikes, team kit, etc. but they were in the middle of nowhere with no stuff at all! Not a pump, seat pack, or saddle bag and nothing in their pockets.

    They were going way too fast to last more than thirty miles without blowing up big-time. None of them seemed to carry more than one bidon so hydration was going to catch them out before they got home.

    I thought of flagging them down to warn them of the risks they were taking, but experience is the best teacher :roll:

    They were all wearing helmets though.
    The older I get the faster I was
  • This thread has made me realise how woefully under prepared I am. I've been going out on the new bike with pretty much nothing at all! OK, most of my rides have been very close to home (round Richmond Park). I think I really only need a mobile phone, for those. But what would you folk recommend for longer rides? Pump, spare inner, tyre boot, patches for inner tube...?
  • Porgy
    Porgy Posts: 4,525
    JackCB wrote:
    This thread has made me realise how woefully under prepared I am. I've been going out on the new bike with pretty much nothing at all! OK, most of my rides have been very close to home (round Richmond Park). I think I really only need a mobile phone, for those. But what would you folk recommend for longer rides? Pump, spare inner, tyre boot, patches for inner tube...?

    spanner / allen keys
  • woody-som
    woody-som Posts: 1,001
    I carry a crank brothers multi19 tool, has all the tools I need (inc chain tool), a spare tube, glueless patches, tyre levers, spare chain quick link, a tyre boot, mini pump combi co2 (never trust just co2).

    can't think I need anything else, well never have yet. apart from the GPS to get me home when lost.
  • Porgy
    Porgy Posts: 4,525
    woody-som wrote:
    I carry a crank brothers multi19 tool, has all the tools I need (inc chain tool), a spare tube, glueless patches, tyre levers, spare chain quick link, a tyre boot, mini pump combi co2 (never trust just co2).

    can't think I need anything else, well never have yet. apart from the GPS to get me home when lost.

    or Ordinance Survey will do.
  • cjw wrote:
    Rockhopper wrote:
    He only had another ten miles to walk to get home!

    That sent a shiver down my spine. Imagine a 10 mile walk in SPD-SL shoes :shock:

    As a few others, if I see a bike on the side of the road or trail I'll always check if they're OK. Only time someone needed help was about a year ago where a chap had a broken chain and had no idea what to do. I fixed it for him with a SRAM link and chain tool.

    10 miles in road shoes? Isn't that what where mobile phones and other halves / taxis / thumbs come into play?? Got me thinking about the chain tho. Don't carry tool or links so would be stuffed (and consider myself to be fairly prep'd...hex keys/levers/pump/repair kit/spanner tool thingy/mobile)
  • nolf
    nolf Posts: 1,287
    I saw a load of them in South Buckinghamshire this sunday. You know the type AGNI lovely, high end bikes, team kit, etc. but they were in the middle of nowhere with no stuff at all! Not a pump, seat pack, or saddle bag and nothing in their pockets.

    They were going way too fast to last more than thirty miles without blowing up big-time. None of them seemed to carry more than one bidon so hydration was going to catch them out before they got home.

    I thought of flagging them down to warn them of the risks they were taking, but experience is the best teacher :roll:

    They were all wearing helmets though.

    You say they couldn't last 30 miles without blowing up big time, maybe they were just quite fit...?
    Me and my uni team like to zoom around, and can keep up a good 20mph+ average over hilly rides of more than 100 miles.
    Also a lot of very fit people don't carry much stuff, personally I always take a fair bit of water, but usually don't take a saddle bag even on century rides.

    As to the main point, good of you to stop and help them out. I once actually had to push my friend 10 miles home when his chain broke (and wasn't fixable). It was quite a challenge actually.
    "I hold it true, what'er befall;
    I feel it, when I sorrow most;
    'Tis better to have loved and lost;
    Than never to have loved at all."

    Alfred Tennyson