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Astarloza B sample

iainf72iainf72 Posts: 15,784
edited September 2009 in Pro race
Positive too.

See ya.
Fckin' Quintana … that creep can roll, man.

Posts

  • Faster than Usain Bolt with the news as ever Iain. Have you got the link please buddy?
    Let's close our eyes and see what happens
  • iainf72iainf72 Posts: 15,784
    Fckin' Quintana … that creep can roll, man.
  • "....confirmation officielle de l'UCI."

    Good work fella. Thanks.
    Let's close our eyes and see what happens
  • drenkromdrenkrom Posts: 1,062
    Speaking of tests and Usain Bolt...

    Nah, just kidding. :roll:
  • drenkrom wrote:
    Speaking of tests and Usain Bolt...

    Nah, just kidding. :roll:

    Dunno what you could possibly mean......!
    Let's close our eyes and see what happens
  • KléberKléber Posts: 6,842
    Aww, no. You mean that moment where he surrounded himself with kids and, dressed in white, pronounced his innocence whilst banging fists on the table was just a last-ditched attempt at media manipulation? :wink:

    Mikel_Astarloza_1456074c.jpg
  • iainf72 wrote:

    I'm very disappointed you had to resort to the european press for this one. Nothing in the Hyderabad star this week?
  • bikerZAbikerZA Posts: 314
    Eustaktel are saying they've received no confirmation of the B-sample..

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/euskalt ... r-analysis
  • Did they say that in a kind of Fawlty Towers' Manuel-esque "I know nothingggg" kind of voice?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mB1cUbFv5Hs
  • KléberKléber Posts: 6,842
    The testing procedure is between the athlete and the testing body, in this case Astarloza and the Spanish authorities. I don't think there is any requirement to inform the team as part of this process. Only the rider, the testing organisation and the governing body are informed.

    But if you have seen some different rules, let me know.
  • LangerDanLangerDan Posts: 6,132
    Kléber wrote:
    The testing procedure is between the athlete and the testing body, in this case Astarloza and the Spanish authorities. I don't think there is any requirement to inform the team as part of this process. Only the rider, the testing organisation and the governing body are informed.

    But if you have seen some different rules, let me know.
    In the event of an adverse finding, the UCI first inform the rider and then the rider's national federation, national anti-doping organisation and WADA.

    They may inform the riders club or team but its not mandatory.

    Of course, "L'Equipe" will have been informed before any of them :wink:
    'This week I 'ave been mostly been climbing like Basso - Shirley Basso.'
  • Drug-free tour anyone?

    Andy
  • PokerfacePokerface Posts: 7,960
    Drug-free tour anyone?

    Andy

    This was a test done BEFORE the Tour. So technically it was still a drug-free Tour!
  • iainf72iainf72 Posts: 15,784
    The team have now confirmed they've recieved notification the B sample was also positive.
    Fckin' Quintana … that creep can roll, man.
  • KléberKléber Posts: 6,842
    They are also defending him, getting the team's lawyers on the case to prove his innocence.
  • I thought Eustaktel were pulling out of cycling next year? Surely a waste of their money trying to defend him?
  • KléberKléber Posts: 6,842
    I think the sponsor is thinking of pulling out but imagine the team, as in the management, is paying for the lawyers. They need their Tour stage winner to be clean after all.
  • Eustakel in court...

    flogging-dead-horse.jpg
    I have nothing more to say on the matter.
  • PokerfacePokerface Posts: 7,960
    Perhaps his lawyers can team up with Di Luca's lawyers and see what they come up with?

    Only thing I can think is a bigger legal fee. :roll:
  • finchyfinchy Posts: 6,686
    I thought I'd heard somewhere that Euskaltel were sticking with the sport. The team has offered 2 year contracts to 2 new, young riders: http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/euskalt ... ext-season

    After the positive dope tests and with the current economic state of things, they wouldn't have signed these riders up for 2 years, unless they have a get-out clause allowing the contract to be annulled if the team folds.
  • bikerZAbikerZA Posts: 314
    I'm struggling to see the logic behind the team defending him - surely it is in their best interest to let the rider defend himself, rather than come accross a team who try to protect convicted dopers?
  • bipedalbipedal Posts: 466
    Bizarre defense:

    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/astarlo ... ck-on-bike

    He had CERA EPO in his sample, right? As far as I know hyperbaric tents don't make synthetic EPO suddenly appear in your body.
  • KléberKléber Posts: 6,842
    "The fact that two minutes before [the testers turned up] he had been on the home trainer in this tent altered his values to the point where it led to errors being made when the results were analysed," Rodríguez told Deia
    :lol: Another audacious excuse, this isn't up there with the "my dog was ill" tale, it's in the class like the Lotto rider who said he tested positive for EPO after dodgy food supplements. It's baloney.

    Altitude training, whether actually at 2000m or in a nitrogen tent is an extremely gradual process. You don't suddenly get a "rush" of EPO production by doing a turbo session inside a tent.

    Mikel, change your defence team :wink:
  • afx237viafx237vi Posts: 12,630
    I thought hyperbaric tents were banned, anyway?
  • iainf72iainf72 Posts: 15,784
    afx237vi wrote:
    I thought hyperbaric tents were banned, anyway?

    Only ones that make you test positive for EPO.
    Fckin' Quintana … that creep can roll, man.
  • Being pedantic, a hyperbaric tent a) simulates being at depth*, and b) the increased PaO2 increases CaO2 (admittedly not by much, as the effect is mainly on dissolved oxygen, rather than that bound to Hb) which I would have thought would suppress intrinsic EPO production?

    Andy

    *Though I concede one could breathe a hypoxic mixture, but wouldn't that increase this risk of N2 narcosis? Not a diver so not sure.
  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 25,477
    afx237vi wrote:
    I thought hyperbaric tents were banned, anyway?

    Only in Italy I think (they're the Valverde of tents)
    Twitter: @RichN95
  • KléberKléber Posts: 6,842
    Being pedantic, a hyperbaric tent a) simulates being at depth*...
    There are no hypobaric tents, the ones used are hypoxic tents, they use a machine to pump in nitrogen to the point where you have, say, only 15% O2 in the tent instead of the usual 21%. The body can respond to the hypoxia but in a gradual way. An athlete needs about 2-3 weeks in one to see any response and the results can be mild. The idea of turning positive for CERA just because you did a turbo session, well that's hilarious.
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