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A view of cycling

WHY.I.MANWHY.I.MAN Posts: 9
edited August 2009 in Road beginners
Hello,

I have dabbled at the fringes of cycling for the last three years. Schoolkids other cyclist's and yes even my own son have poked fun at my XXL large body riding a relatively tiny folding bike to work each day to earn a meagre crust.

But now my friends the worm has turned. Soon I shall be hauling my massive beehind upon the chariot of my dreams a Boardman Pro Carbon .

How will my contempories judge me. Probably with scorn if my opinion of modern cycling clubs is correct. Unlike other sports where the beginner is encouraged.

Cycling clubs care nought for the Newbee. It seems to be sink or swim trying to keep up with the leading pack.

It's the impression I have gathered over the years.....Am I right or am I wrong ?
Well I live in Durham City.....any clubs in the Durham area care to answer the question ?

Posts

  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,601
    WHY.I.MAN wrote:
    Hello,

    I have dabbled at the fringes of cycling for the last three years. Schoolkids other cyclist's and yes even my own son have poked fun at my XXL large body riding a relatively tiny folding bike to work each day to earn a meagre crust.

    But now my friends the worm has turned. Soon I shall be hauling my massive beehind upon the chariot of my dreams a Boardman Pro Carbon .

    How will my contempories judge me. Probably with scorn if my opinion of modern cycling clubs is correct. Unlike other sports where the beginner is encouraged.

    Cycling clubs care nought for the Newbee. It seems to be sink or swim trying to keep up with the leading pack.

    It's the impression I have gathered over the years.....Am I right or am I wrong ?
    Well I live in Durham City.....any clubs in the Durham area care to answer the question ?

    My experience is that RACING clubs DO tend to be somewhat snobbish(for lack of a better word) to the newbie rider. People seem to have to prove themselves in some way or another to get much of a response from the "seasoned" club "pros". I use those words sarcastically. At times it must seem to prospective members that they are joining
    a "gang" of sorts. No one ever seems to simply be "accepted".
    As for "casual / no pressure ridding" clubs, these seem a bit more attuned to the needs of new members. However, one thing is for certain. If you get two or more people riding together one or more of them is going to have to show the rest who the top dog is. It's human nature. This often takes the form of impromptu racing, which can be very dangerous, as newbies try to hang on and safety gets abandoned in favor of who can be the first to the local convenience store for water. I, personally, have a big problem with this type of racing / riding and don't participate in it. Racing should be done at races, where traffic can be somewhat controlled and rider safety is the main issue.
    Sorry if I ranted on. :wink::wink:
  • GarzGarz Posts: 1,155
    Dont let the clubs put you off why.i.man, in fact why dont you just begin by getting your bike and riding on it till your comfortable and have a bit of fitness up enjoying your rides before considering joining any club?
  • Takis61Takis61 Posts: 239
    I agree, forget the club for the mo, work on fitness, speed, cadence, and just enjoying it - started in 2004 & still not a clubman myself.
    And remember, £5K of Trek Madone is only ever going to go as fast as the porky rider on it can pedal, it's not a Harley. :)
    My knees hurt !
  • I wasn't sure if my impresion was correct but it seems that it was.
    so Ill do as you suggest and plug away on me 'jack jones'

    Still waiting for my Boardman....can't wait.



    My dad was a cyclist way back in 1952 in Scotland, he tells me that even then that if you didn't have the 'proper equipment' racing bike etc. then nobody in the club would talk to you.
    He says that back then a decent racing bike would have cost the ordinary guy in the street a 3rd of thier normal yearly wages. Bikes then were custom built, his material of course was reynolds 531 .

    But you could leave your bike unlocked and come back to find it still there.
  • I wasn't sure if my impresion was correct but it seems that it was.
    so Ill do as you suggest and plug away on me 'jack jones'

    Still waiting for my Boardman....can't wait.



    My dad was a cyclist way back in 1952 in Scotland, he tells me that even then that if you didn't have the 'proper equipment' racing bike etc. then nobody in the club would talk to you.
    He says that back then a decent racing bike would have cost the ordinary guy in the street a 3rd of thier normal yearly wages. Bikes then were custom built, his material of course was reynolds 531 .

    But you could leave your bike unlocked and come back to find it still there.
  • speedospeedo Posts: 115
    Hi there
    Took up cycling just over a year ago, ( no previous experience ) and I have just joined a cycle racing club,after going out solo.
    I find the club members extremely friendly,and informative,with a good mix of experience and abilities
    Club runs are generally 3 times a week,with the SPEED MERCHANTS going out early.
    The Sunday group ride is usually 60 miles,with a mix of ages from 20yrs to 72 yrs.
    I am now cycling around 130 miles a week with club members,and thoroughly enjoying it and managing to keep up,if you fall behind,someone always come back for you ( at least in my club)
    I am 64

    DONT THINK TWICE - JOIN A CLUB - IT WILL BE THE BEST THING YOU COULD DO
  • wiffachipwiffachip Posts: 861
    nee idea, crackin name though bonny lad
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