Bike maintenance courses in Manchester

sidrhino
sidrhino Posts: 26
edited August 2009 in Workshop
Hi
I am looking for a course/evening classes for bike maintenance so I can tinker with my bike. would be grateful for any advice and dos and don'ts
cheers

Comments

  • sturmey
    sturmey Posts: 964
    I would advise you to just have a go yourself rather than pay some big outfit to show you how to mend a puncture and adjust your gears.

    Plenty of resorces on the web i.e http://www.parktool.com/repair/ AND

    http://bicycletutor.com/

    Why don't you get an old racer for peanuts and practise on that?
  • hugo15
    hugo15 Posts: 1,101
    One day courses are run by Edinburgh Bike Co-Op. Cost is just under £50. I found the course really useful.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    buying too old a bike and practising on it won't help much when trying to fettle a modern bike; nearly everything could be out of date.

    Headsets are now integrated / aheadset types rather than lockring / quill stems.
    Indexed gears with shifters integrated into the brake levers.
    Bottom brackets have evolved from loose bearings to cartridge types to outboard and now BB30 is appearing
    Crank arms / axles, once attached using cotter pins, have gone through countless improvements; square taper, octalinketc to the two piece cranksets we have today
    Freewheels have been superseded by freehubs.

    Brakes and hubs are about the only things that haven't changed radically.
  • Jimbo.
    Jimbo. Posts: 124
    Buy the soon-to-be-released "Zinn and the art of road bike maintenance", some basic tools and fettle away. If the book is anything like it's MTB counterpart, it'll be, well...perfect: plenty of detail, explains everything, clear diagrams, never patronising, never OTT. £20 well spent!
  • sturmey
    sturmey Posts: 964
    keef66 wrote:
    buying too old a bike and practising on it won't help much when trying to fettle a modern bike; nearly everything could be out of date.

    Headsets are now integrated / aheadset types rather than lockring / quill stems.
    Indexed gears with shifters integrated into the brake levers.
    Bottom brackets have evolved from loose bearings to cartridge types to outboard and now BB30 is appearing
    Crank arms / axles, once attached using cotter pins, have gone through countless improvements; square taper, octalinketc to the two piece cranksets we have today
    Freewheels have been superseded by freehubs.

    Brakes and hubs are about the only things that haven't changed radically

    Keef66 has become a cycling Guru overnight!

    Only last week he was struggling to remove a freewheel from his son's bike:

    http://www.bikeradar.com/forums/viewtop ... =#15528164

    Sounds like he is the one who should be practising on an old racer to me.
  • Eddy S
    Eddy S Posts: 1,013
    sidrhino wrote:
    Hi
    I am looking for a course/evening classes for bike maintenance so I can tinker with my bike. would be grateful for any advice and dos and don'ts
    cheers
    There is a maintenance course being run at the Velodrome this Saturday (22nd Aug) - see the infio/link at the bottom of this page ->http://www.manchestervelodrome.com/static_info/new_sessions.htm
    I’m a sprinter – I warmed up yesterday.
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    I was only struggling to remove the freewheel because Wiggle's "freewheel remover" turned out to be a cassette lockring tool. I've been breaking and fixing bikes for 35 years, so I have probably made more mistakes than most. Guru I'm gertainly not. Sheldon Brown's the guru.

    I was just pointing out that mucking about with an old bike isn't neccessarily the best way to learn how to maintain a new one.