Forum home Road cycling forum Road beginners

what tyres?

mickusmickus Posts: 199
edited July 2009 in Road beginners
Hi All,

Having recently bought a road bike for commuting I am finding I get punctures far more regularly than I should!

I ride through Bristol and there are cobbled roads all over the place and the other roads are in rubbish condition!

What tyres would you suggest to help prevent pinch flats and other poor road related punctures? Also I would like to feel more confident in the wet on the cobbles!

I don't particularly want to spend the earth but am open to all options.

Thanks,

Mike

Posts

  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,038
    mickus wrote:
    prevent pinch flats and other poor road related punctures?

    Try a higher tyre pressure first of all
  • mickusmickus Posts: 199
    I have them as hard as rock! My pressure gauge is broken, but I can tell you they are sufficiently pumped up.

    Just so you know, I'm only a novice to road bikes. I have been mountain biking for 10 years. I was actually quite amazed at how different it is though!

    I have been looking at these:

    http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/components/tyres/road/product/twin-rail-courier-tyres-09-34099

    But wondered if there were similar tyres for less. If nothing else comes up, I will happily pay £20 per tyre. Just on the bargain hunt and hoped to gain some knowledge on road tyres at the same time.

    Cheers
  • WoodchipWoodchip Posts: 205
    I thought my tyres were sufficiently pumped up until I got pressure gauge on them and they were only at 50psi. Went and bought a track pump, stuck another 50psi in them and they roll sooooooooo much better now. Hadn't suffered a pinch flat though, so I may have been alright, but just 'coz they feel hard doesn't mean they're hard enough.
    I have nothing more to say on the matter.
  • mickusmickus Posts: 199
    I have a fairly decent track pump and I've pumped them to the point where I'm scared to pump any more! (or too weak to - you decide)

    I will get a gauge on them and see how high I got them - I was guessing at around 70psi, but from what you have said, they may be a touch soft!

    I still fear the cobbles though. Some more grip in the rain is definitely a must!

    Thanks
  • balthazarbalthazar Posts: 1,565
    You shouldn't need much more than 100psi in your tyres.

    Higher volume (wider) tyres will help you. They are more comfortable, grip better, and are less prone to pinch punctures, with no cost to rolling resistance (sometimes a slight benefit). Get the largest that will clear your brakes or frame, which may be a little as 25mm, or as much as 32mm+, depending on your bike.

    I suggest:

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/Panar ... 110000290/
  • bobtbuilderbobtbuilder Posts: 1,537
    I use Continental GP 4000s. They are great tyres, and I have never had a problem with them. They will set you back £25-£30 per tyre though.
  • mickusmickus Posts: 199
    Those panaracers look ideal.

    I currently have 23's on my bike and would like to go as big as possible. I'm pretty sure there is plenty of clearence with the frams, just not so sure with the brakes.

    Is there an easy way of testing what size I could go up to?
  • balthazarbalthazar Posts: 1,565
    mickus wrote:
    Those panaracers look ideal.

    I currently have 23's on my bike and would like to go as big as possible. I'm pretty sure there is plenty of clearence with the frams, just not so sure with the brakes.

    Is there an easy way of testing what size I could go up to?
    Not that I'm aware of, unfortunately. Perhaps post the brakes you have, and see if anybody has experience of fitting larger tyres under them. In general, with normal road brakes, 25mm tyres are about the limit – but Panaracer come up small so 28's might go.
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    GP4000s are great race tyres - I'd maybe look for a heavier tyre for commuting - but if I had only one set of tyres - I'd have them.

    Yeah PSI is important. I never go over 100 PSI these days. I used to go to 140 PSI and would get a lot more flats.
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