Pedals/Shoes

clempnerj
clempnerj Posts: 2
edited July 2009 in Road beginners
I’m a recent convert to cycling, and have just got a cboardman Hybrid Team bike with the Cycle2Work scheme.

I had clips and straps on the pedals I got with the bike, but haven’t mastered the technique of getting my left foot in on the move (in normal trainers), and am a little uneasy about getting them out in a hurry.

As a temporary measure I have put flat platforms on – and will probably use those for general riding and the quick commute in non cycling shoes. I do however want to get some pedal/shoe combination that will keep my foot in the right position and help power transfer (even I noticed the difference with just my right foot in the clips!), be easy to get off, and I can walk in the shoes – for a trip to the bar at the half way point of a weekend ride!

So to the questions!

Are SPD pedals/shoes the right way to go? Is it possible to ride with normal shoes on? Which would be a good set? (want something commensurate with the quality of the bike – price not a particular concern but I’m not going to be entering the Tour anytime soon!)

Any advice gratefully received!

Jon

PS Most of my cycling will be river tow paths, woodland paths, cycle paths, and road – occasionally forays over slightly bumpier stuff – but only to get between the first set of stuff. Definitely no sides of mountains involved.

Comments

  • Garry H
    Garry H Posts: 6,639
    clempnerj wrote:
    I’m a recent convert to cycling, and have just got a cboardman Hybrid Team bike with the Cycle2Work scheme.

    I had clips and straps on the pedals I got with the bike, but haven’t mastered the technique of getting my left foot in on the move (in normal trainers), and am a little uneasy about getting them out in a hurry.

    As a temporary measure I have put flat platforms on – and will probably use those for general riding and the quick commute in non cycling shoes. I do however want to get some pedal/shoe combination that will keep my foot in the right position and help power transfer (even I noticed the difference with just my right foot in the clips!), be easy to get off, and I can walk in the shoes – for a trip to the bar at the half way point of a weekend ride!

    So to the questions!

    Are SPD pedals/shoes the right way to go? Is it possible to ride with normal shoes on? Which would be a good set? (want something commensurate with the quality of the bike – price not a particular concern but I’m not going to be entering the Tour anytime soon!)

    Any advice gratefully received!

    Jon

    PS Most of my cycling will be river tow paths, woodland paths, cycle paths, and road – occasionally forays over slightly bumpier stuff – but only to get between the first set of stuff. Definitely no sides of mountains involved.

    You can get pedals with SPD on one side and a normal platform on the other. Might be the compromise you're after...
  • fatgit
    fatgit Posts: 166
    Garry H wrote:

    You can get pedals with SPD on one side and a normal platform on the other. Might be the compromise you're after...

    Thats what I've got and they're really good, obviously if you're going to race all that extra weight might be an issue :roll:
  • Surf-Matt
    Surf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    I would say it's worth going for SPDs but maybe do it in steps?

    I rode my MTB for years with MTB SPD shoes (without cleats) on flat pedals - that way you get the stiffness of the sole without the splat factor of SPDs.

    Got Specialied Tahos which can easily be walked in (I've even run 3 miles with them on - major flat tyre), look "normal" and won't break the bank.

    http://www.evanscycles.com/products/spe ... query=taho

    Now got SPDs on the MTB (XT) and the road bike (MTB orientated M520s - same cleats needed as the XTs) and really like them. I had them 10 years ago and never got on with them but they are a LOT better now - hold your foot better but also release more effectively.

    If you are still worried, you can get "multi release" cleats - instead of just a horizontal twist, you can release from all sorts of angles.

    http://www.jejamescycles.co.uk/id6851.html
  • 1892
    1892 Posts: 1,690
    A lot of pedals now come with reflectors that clip into one side of the pedal turning them into a flat pedal
    Justice for the 96
  • Garry H
    Garry H Posts: 6,639
    fatgit wrote:
    Garry H wrote:

    You can get pedals with SPD on one side and a normal platform on the other. Might be the compromise you're after...

    Thats what I've got and they're really good, obviously if you're going to race all that extra weight might be an issue :roll:

    Where does it mention racing?
  • fatgit
    fatgit Posts: 166
    Garry H wrote:
    fatgit wrote:
    Garry H wrote:

    You can get pedals with SPD on one side and a normal platform on the other. Might be the compromise you're after...

    Thats what I've got and they're really good, obviously if you're going to race all that extra weight might be an issue :roll:

    Where does it mention racing?
    it doesn't, hence I said IF you're going to race
  • soveda
    soveda Posts: 306
    Surf-Matt wrote:
    I would say it's worth going for SPDs but maybe do it in steps?

    I rode my MTB for years with MTB SPD shoes (without cleats) on flat pedals - that way you get the stiffness of the sole without the splat factor of SPDs.

    The splat factor is overstated, I've not had a "I can't get out of the pedals" moment in 12 years of going "clipless"
    Got Specialied Tahos which can easily be walked in (I've even run 3 miles with them on - major flat tyre), look "normal" and won't break the bank.

    http://www.evanscycles.com/products/spe ... query=taho

    Now got SPDs on the MTB (XT) and the road bike (MTB orientated M520s - same cleats needed as the XTs) and really like them. I had them 10 years ago and never got on with them but they are a LOT better now - hold your foot better but also release more effectively.

    If you are still worried, you can get "multi release" cleats - instead of just a horizontal twist, you can release from all sorts of angles.

    http://www.jejamescycles.co.uk/id6851.html

    +1 for the rest
  • Surf-Matt
    Surf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    soveda - I used to have spds on my 1997 Stumpjumper and had MANY crashes made worse due to them not unclipping; so I gave up on them after two years and went back to flats.

    It's also too easy on an MTB to learn bad form and rely on them for stuff like bunny hops (I can hop about 2ft on flats) - not so relevant on a road bike!

    Tried them again recently and they have improved massively - but I still forgot I had them on and keeled over 15 mins after I set off on my first ride with them! Rather embarrassing and cut myself up nicely.

    Now pretty much used to them.
  • Flasheart
    Flasheart Posts: 1,278
    Have you got cleats fitted to your surboard to save on the wax Surf-Matt? :wink:
    The universal aptitude for ineptitude makes any human accomplishment an incredible miracle. ...Stapp’s Ironical Paradox Law
    FCN3
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  • Surf-Matt
    Surf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    But of course!