Alpe d'Huez - what £1000 bike ??

supersoaker
supersoaker Posts: 3
edited July 2009 in Road beginners
I am looking to buy a new road bike for around £1000
I am mostly interested in long distance riding - In particular, I am heading to the Alps later this year to tackle some of the biggest alpine climbs including Alpe d'Huez.

I am a mountain biker returning to tarmac after many years and way out of touch with the latest technology.

I have been advised to look at a "Sportive" style bike - as "the geometry is more geared to comfort than pure speed",

Can anyone recommend a suitable £1000 bike for this trip ?
Do I need to look at a carbon frame ?

I had considered the Focus Cayo (good reviews and value) but am wondering if this would be too stiff a ride for me (and - as a relatvive newbie -would I even notice the difference) ?

Any advice is appreciated.

Comments

  • 2tired2ride
    2tired2ride Posts: 285
    Orbea Onix Bira.

    http://www.orbea.com/en-gb/productos/bicicletas/Pages/bicicletas.aspx

    Or

    Boardman Team Carbon

    Both of these bikes have compact gearing but make sure the bike you choose has a compact chainset (50/34 chain rings).
    "If we all had hardtails we'd all go down the hill, just slower"
    Nick Larsen


    Voodoo D-Jab Ti
    Boardman Road Team 09
    Boardman Urban Team 08
    Falcon 3 Speed
  • majormantra
    majormantra Posts: 2,094
    Ribble Carbon Sportive? Although they tend to be backordered, so not ideal if you're in a hurry.

    I recently got mine and its lovely.

    Matthew
  • markos1963
    markos1963 Posts: 3,724
    +1 for the Orbea, I know its a vote for a bike I own(2007 Bira with 105) but if its a climber you're looking for then I can honestly vouch for its ability. I am a poor climber but I can hang with the better guys on the club run as I don't waste any energy with this frame, every turn of the crank feels like its being transfered to the wheel. On sunday I even managed to put a sprint in at the end of the ride and get the jump on other riders with its sudden acceleration. The front end is controlled but not too stiff and unforgiving, it tips into bends nicely and tracks well during the turn. Other club members ride Cayos and speak highly of them but they do have a short head tube giving a racier position so its something to think about.
    Best value for money on the Onix is from Epic, http://www.epic-cycles.co.uk/orbea.htm if you can get to them you'll get fantastic service as well as a good bike. If you can stretch to the 105 model its worth the difference.
  • sampras38
    sampras38 Posts: 1,917
    Ribble Carbon Sportive? Although they tend to be backordered, so not ideal if you're in a hurry.

    I recently got mine and its lovely.

    Matthew

    Yeah, from what I understand they take weeks to deliver the bike from initial order. A friend of mine certainly had that experience. It's a shame as they really are nice bikes.
  • screebs
    screebs Posts: 178
    I am thinking of a new bike for similar reasons, i am aiming to get it for under the £1000 to be part of the CTW scheme.

    I have narrowed my search down to 4 Carbon road bikes:

    Dolan Mythos

    Viner Gladius

    Boardman Pro carbon

    Orbea 2009 Onix Vuelta

    Still not sure which one to go for, but they might be worth looking at for you also.

    SCREEBS
    Me struggling up Mont Ventoux for the first time! Done it 3 times since (each way up) without stopping. This seems like a lifetime ago! http://img208.imageshack.us/i/snapshot2 ... 45552.tif/
  • Thanks for all the input
    Will check out some of these suggestions
  • ShaunL
    ShaunL Posts: 91
    A mate and I did Galibier and Alp D'Huez a couple of years ago and I'd definitely recommend the lightest bike you can get for the climbs alongside a compact chainset and a x-27 cassette.

    You can always change it back when you come home for a non compact and 11-25
  • pneumatic
    pneumatic Posts: 1,989
    As someone mildly famous once said "It's not about the bike."

    When I went up the Alpe (on a steel tourer), there were folk on all kinds of bikes. Whatever you ride, it is fitness and determination that gets you to the top.

    In fact, if you don't have a bike at all, drop into the Hotel Edelweiss at La Grave. They have an old Dutch shopper leaning against the wall and, according to the owner, anyone who can ride it to the top of the Alpe and back gets a free evening meal! :D


    Fast and Bulbous
    Peregrinations
    Eddingtons: 80 (Metric); 60 (Imperial)

  • ShaunL
    ShaunL Posts: 91
    Agree you don't have to have a bike with you, there is a great place in Bourg D'Oisan that will hire you a decent bike for the climb.

    Also you do need to have the fitness, just having a light bike helps a hell of alot.
  • balthazar
    balthazar Posts: 1,565
    For interest, here's the bike Fausto Coppi (probably) rode up the Alpe d'Huez the first time it featured in the TdF–

    img_1318.jpg

    Might cost a bit more than a grand now though..