Building up a bike from scratch

gabriel959
gabriel959 Posts: 4,227
edited May 2009 in Workshop
Hello guys,

I am planning to buy a new frame and transfer almost everything from the old bike to the new one. I have one of the basic lifeline toolkits.

Will I need any other tools to do so? Can you also recommend and specific book or guides on how to do this kind of thing ... and will I need to replace some parts (such as cables?)

It is this one: http://www.wiggle.co.uk/p/cycle/7/LifeLine_Workshop_Tool_Kit/5360031531/

Thanks,
Gabriel
x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x
Commuting / Winter rides - Jamis Renegade Expert
Pootling / Offroad - All-City Macho Man Disc
Fast rides Cannondale SuperSix Ultegra

Comments

  • arankapila
    arankapila Posts: 39
    Gabriel,

    This is a surprisingly easy process, it just takes a little care. You will need all the right size allen keys, a tool to remove and install the headset (if it has a standard aheadset). Don't take shortcuts with installing the headset - get a LBS to do it if needs be - the cheapest headset presses are £40.

    The bottom bracket will also require a specialist tool which can be bought for sub £10, you also need to check the bb width to see if it is right for your new frame (especially if your old frame is quite, er... old!)

    Apart from these, the allen keys will serve you well.

    Have you go the right size seatpost for your new frame? If not, you will either need a new shim, or a new post.

    At this point it is indeed a good idea to replace your cable inners as they will be worn and frayed, making reinstallation difficult. They cost only a few quid. If there is a lot of cable friction, the replace the outers too. Have a decent set of wire/cable cutters at the ready to get a clean cut.

    Remember to grease all the new bolts that are going and all the new treads - especially on the bottom bracket and headset.

    Park Tools (see chainreactioncycles.com) do some very good bike maintenance books, alternatively try sheldonbrown.com for all things bikes! He will probably provide you with a step by step guide.

    Hope that helps, and good luck!
  • GavH
    GavH Posts: 933
    Make sure the new frame has a gear hangar. I made this mistake on a MTB project. Worse still, I still don't know which hangar will fit because I have no idea the make of the frame (it was bare metal, bankrupt stock)!! :oops:
  • gabriel959
    gabriel959 Posts: 4,227
    Cheers for the advice guys - really appreciated.

    Do you think I will need a workstand to get it built?

    I was planning on upgrading the chainset plus bottom bracket too but I have got a triple and I am looking at one of those FSA OmegaMega exo chainsets in the Planet X sale. Will my Tiagra shifters work with them? Also there seem to be two types:

    FSA Omega Mega Exo Chainset 175mm 50/34 330-1955
    FSA Omega Mega Exo Chainset 172.5mm 50/34 330-1952

    Whats the difference? :)

    And what kind of headset will I need? Threaded or threadless? I am basically transfering
    all my components from a Giant SCR2 to a TCR Alliance frame.

    Thanks in advance!!!
    x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x
    Commuting / Winter rides - Jamis Renegade Expert
    Pootling / Offroad - All-City Macho Man Disc
    Fast rides Cannondale SuperSix Ultegra
  • giant_man
    giant_man Posts: 6,878
    Gabriel - great advice from arankapila, very good tips.

    A workstand is very handy for that missing 3rd hand! You can get a simple one for under 100 quid. Frees up your second hand if you see what I mean. I wouldn't personally build up a bike without one cos it just makes things easier.

    Not sure about the FSA stuff sorry.
  • gundersen
    gundersen Posts: 586
    Make sure the new frame has a gear hangar. I made this mistake on a MTB project. Worse still, I still don't know which hangar will fit because I have no idea the make of the frame (it was bare metal, bankrupt stock)!!

    GavH make a cardboard cutout of what you need and take it to your lbs. They should be able to sort it out easily.

    If it was me I would just cut a piece of aluminium and drill holes in it.
  • robbarker
    robbarker Posts: 1,367
    A repair stand will be a big help.

    The trickiest job will be moving the headset and crown race over. You really need the proper tools to do this without a risk of borking the components and new frame, so best get an LBS to do it.

    Study Park tools repair help section on their website at length before you start.
  • RedJohn
    RedJohn Posts: 272
    edited May 2009
    gabriel959 wrote:

    FSA Omega Mega Exo Chainset 175mm 50/34 330-1955
    FSA Omega Mega Exo Chainset 172.5mm 50/34 330-1952

    Whats the difference? :)

    Difference is the crank length - 175mm is long, 172.5 is medium, 170mm is short. Which is best depends largely on your leg length and whether you prefer to mash a high gear (in which case go longer) or spin a low gear (go shorter). A lot is down to personal preference. Theree's not an enormous difference mind you, I don't know how much it would actually be noticeable.

    I am 6'2" / 1.88m tall, with 33" / 84cm inside leg measurement, and I use a 172.5 (on the advice of my LBS) which I think suits me well. I haven't tried a 175 on the same bike - my old bike has a 175mm, as does my mountainbike, but the nature of the bike si so different that I can't compare.
    I find I ride naturally at about 95-105 rpm on the road, which is fairly fast but not extremely so.

    Shifers and front mech - may or may not be compatible, if you currently have a triple set up. You'd need to check with a bike shop.
    They may tell you that you need a compact specific front mech, but if you're on a budget then a non-specific front mech should be able to be made to work, albeit maybe not quite as slickly - but if the shifters are triple specific, then the amoutnof cable they pull each step may be wrong for the double.

    Does anyone know if the chainring spacing on a triple is the same as on a double? If so, then there shouldn't be any problem.
  • gabriel959
    gabriel959 Posts: 4,227
    RedJohn wrote:
    gabriel959 wrote:

    FSA Omega Mega Exo Chainset 175mm 50/34 330-1955
    FSA Omega Mega Exo Chainset 172.5mm 50/34 330-1952

    Whats the difference? :)

    Difference is the crank length - 175mm is long, 172.5 is medium, 170mm is short. Which is best depends largely on your leg length and whether you prefer to mash a high gear (in which case go longer) or spin a low gear (go shorter). A lot is down to personal preference. Theree's not an enormous difference mind you, I don't know how much it would actually be noticeable.

    I am 6'2" / 1.88m tall, with 33" / 84cm inside leg measurement, and I use a 172.5 (on the advice of my LBS) which I think suits me well. I haven't tried a 175 on the same bike - my old bike has a 175mm, as does my mountainbike, but the nature of the bike si so different that I can't compare.
    I find I ride naturally at about 95-105 rpm on the road, which is fairly fast but not extremely so.

    Cheers for that - great explanation! :)

    What about the number at the end? One is 1955 and the other 1952.
    x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x
    Commuting / Winter rides - Jamis Renegade Expert
    Pootling / Offroad - All-City Macho Man Disc
    Fast rides Cannondale SuperSix Ultegra
  • RedJohn
    RedJohn Posts: 272
    gabriel959 wrote:
    RedJohn wrote:
    gabriel959 wrote:

    FSA Omega Mega Exo Chainset 175mm 50/34 330-1955
    FSA Omega Mega Exo Chainset 172.5mm 50/34 330-1952

    Whats the difference? :)

    Difference is the crank length - 175mm is long, 172.5 is medium, 170mm is short. Which is best depends largely on your leg length and whether you prefer to mash a high gear (in which case go longer) or spin a low gear (go shorter). A lot is down to personal preference. Theree's not an enormous difference mind you, I don't know how much it would actually be noticeable.

    I am 6'2" / 1.88m tall, with 33" / 84cm inside leg measurement, and I use a 172.5 (on the advice of my LBS) which I think suits me well. I haven't tried a 175 on the same bike - my old bike has a 175mm, as does my mountainbike, but the nature of the bike si so different that I can't compare.
    I find I ride naturally at about 95-105 rpm on the road, which is fairly fast but not extremely so.

    Cheers for that - great explanation! :)

    What about the number at the end? One is 1955 and the other 1952.

    I think that'll be the manufacturer's product code.
  • Chaz.Harding
    Chaz.Harding Posts: 3,144
    The Zinn book, and the Haynes books are usually the standered answer.

    It's not too difiicult.

    I'd suggest like others, that you get the headset pressed at you LBS, and possibly the bottom bracket too. If you f*ck it up, you'll have to get the threads re-cut.

    Not a problem on steel bikes, but if it's an alloy thread (alot of the lighter race-bikes are) then the threads are alot more delicate.
    Boo-yah mofo
    Sick to the power of rad
    Fix it 'till it's broke
  • Pokerface
    Pokerface Posts: 7,960
    You should probably replace all your cables when doing a rebuild. The exterior housings can be re-sued, but you'll need new inners.

    I've rebuilt my bike several times now and as others say - it's actually pretty easy.
  • Hugh A
    Hugh A Posts: 1,189
    Agree with what has been said - check that the headset is the same type as your old bike or you will need a new one. It is much easier to fit these with the right tool but it can be managed (with care!) without. With integrated headsets normally the only bit you need to fit with a tool is the fork crown race.

    You might need to get the bottom bracket faced before fitting the bb. Again your lbs should have the tool - it mills paint and some metal off to make sure the faces are properly aligned.
    I\'m sure I had one of those here somewhere
  • bice
    bice Posts: 772
    I have just done a build with an unused Italian steel frame. For that reason I went for a Capmpagnolo mix: Centaur levers, chorus rear mech, record cranks, Veloce cassette and so on.

    I had the headset done in an LBS. I had a Chorus BB, but had it taken out and 'serviced'. (Its on its way out but will last until winter).

    The rest is relatively simple, though I could not get the Chorus rear mech to thread through the dropout (which is part of the frame), forced it in and put it in at an angle. So a friend had to re-tap the thread and sort it.

    The levers were a pain, as it was difficult to get a hex screw driver to tighten them up. They were too loose and slipped, which meant redoing the bar tape.

    I fell right out of love with Campagnolo doing this, but now think that although more basic than Shimano, more solid and reliable too.

    I suppose I spent £650 (the frame was a bargain £220 bought in Rome - Italians don't appreciate these minor art works and all want carbon).

    It's a lovely individual, super light weight steel bike that smooths out all road rumble and is a springly as a whippet. So I'd do it again. (I also love my Trek 1.7, with its really comfortable geometry. But it is less special than one you have done yourself.)

    So good luck. Oh, and get a bike stand if you can: I went for a £35 ironing board type from eBay and it is very stable. (Cheapie ones with just a grip might be too wobbly.)
  • volvicspar
    volvicspar Posts: 208
    No one has mentioned a crank puller ? You will need it to get the cranks off your old bike :-)
    Don't go hitting it with a hammer to get it off
    :P
  • Monty Dog
    Monty Dog Posts: 20,614
    quote:
    The levers were a pain, as it was difficult to get a hex screw driver to tighten them up. They were too loose and slipped, which meant redoing the bar tape.

    If your levers are 2009 models, not such a surprise as they need a T25 Torx bit to tighten them - the screws are aluminium and an Allen key could knacker them.

    www.parktool.com is a great resource for all things mechanical, as well as the venerable www.sheldonbrown.com
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • bice
    bice Posts: 772
    Sorry dont know the name of these screw drivers (I used one from the car tool kit), but not an Alan key fitting like everything else? appunto, perche? perche?


    (My shifters are the older aluminium ones, not carbon)